Non-Profit Managers Turn to Executive Education Programs

The Financial Times on Wednesday highlighted business school programs geared toward non-profit managers in dire need of brushing up on their leadership skills during this time of economic crisis.

Programs targeting non-profit managers are fairly new at most business schools; the expense of executive education programs for corporate customers ”“ they are typically a cash cow for business schools ”“ makes them out of reach for most, FT says.

But some business schools have found a way to make them affordable for social sector clients through sponsorship and grants to sub­sidize the programs.

Here’s a look at some of the programs mentioned in the article. Click here to read the whole story in the Financial Times.

Thunderbird School of Global Management ran a program in March for high-potential leaders of top social sector organizations in the US and overseas. A $200,000 grant by the American Express Foundation funded the program. Part­icipants spent a week at the school’s Glendale, Arizona, campus learning about non-profit sustainability, strategy, brand management, fundraising and innovation.

Kellogg School of Management offers short courses on social sector management. The classes include critical issues in board governance, leveraging resources through partnering, and non-profit finance, and the goal is to provide intense courses on specific issues for non-profit leaders who may not have a week to spare at a training seminar.

Stanford Graduate School of Business started a mini-MBA program in 2001 geared at non-profit executives. The program, subsidized mainly by grants from the Hewlett Foundation and the Packard Foundation and alumni gifts, is held every year and lasts two weeks.

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