Last-Minute Checklist for Round 1 Applicants

Are you planning on applying in Round 1, which at many schools is just weeks (or September 9th, in the case of HBS) away? There are several reasons to apply in the first round, from …

Are you planning on applying in Round 1, which at many schools is just weeks (or September 9th, in the case of HBS) away? There are several reasons to apply in the first round, from demonstrating your strong interest and preparation, improving your chances of landing a spot while every possible seat is available, to having first crack at financial aid opportunities.

Bloomberg Businessweek just ran a story discussing what to do to prepare for round 1 deadlines, and I shared some of my thoughts with Katy Finneran, author of the piece. One important thing I stress to clients, and mentioned to Finneran, is the importance of managing your social media presence and beefing up your online persona.

If you can demonstrate you’re social media savvy, and perhaps show that side of yourself through a blog, Twitter feed, or even through Instagram if you’ve touched on an interest such as photography in your application, these factors can really work to your advantage.

By now, you should also have your recommenders firmly on board in support of your candidacy. If you’re aiming at round 2, make sure they have their instructions and hard deadlines about 12 weeks before you want their letters.

Another thing to remember is to adapt your resume for an MBA application, which should have a greater emphasis on your general accomplishments and anything that would showcase your leadership qualities.

Finally, I would urge applicants to apply a few days ahead of the deadline just to ease some of the last-minute pressure, as well as congestion on the programs’ servers. Do a thorough review, hit submit, and take comfort in knowing that you did your very best.

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5 Last-Minute Tips for Round 1 Applicants

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Business Schools Respond to Market Demands

Technology and entrepreneurship are changing the face of management education, a story in Monday’s Chicago Tribune reports. Economic and social challenges require creative solutions, and business schools have found themselves rapidly adapting to address those …

Technology and entrepreneurship are changing the face of management education, a story in Monday’s Chicago Tribune reports. Economic and social challenges require creative solutions, and business schools have found themselves rapidly adapting to address those issues head-on.

To meet the needs of a volatile job market, many elite MBA programs have begun to shift away from case studies and quantitative models to place greater emphasis on experiential learning and degree concentrations so that graduates are ready to hit the ground running on Day 1.

The globalization of business requires a new generation of leadership that is able to comfortably navigate in various cultural contexts. To meet that challenge, more and more schools have made international projects a degree requirement, such as the new global insight program announced by Tuck School of Business last week.

For MBA applicants who already know what they want to do post-graduation, the one-year MBA is an option that has grown tremendously in the past couple of years.

Since Dean Sally Blount took the helm at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management in 2010, the school has refocused its energies to boost one-year MBA enrollment to keep pace with the global marketplace. However, this type of program is for students who aren’t looking to change careers, because it offers no internship.

Meanwhile, top MBA programs across the country are adding multiple courses in entrepreneurship to meet a growing demand, despite the fact that only an estimated five percent of graduates start their own company straight out of business school.

Ultimately, “Business school is all about constant change and improvement and response to the market,” Elissa Sangster, executive director of the Forte Foundation, a nonprofit consortium of companies and business schools supporting women’s access to business education, tells the Tribune. “It’s always good to look for the next thing to produce better future leaders.”

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The Case Method: Alive and Thriving or On its Way Out?

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NFL Partners with IU Kelley School for Online MBA Program

The National Football League Players Association has announced a partnership with the Indiana University Kelley School of Business to provide customized graduate-level educational programs to current and former NFL players. The Kelley School will offer …

NFL and IU Kelley MBA

The National Football League Players Association has announced a partnership with the Indiana University Kelley School of Business to provide customized graduate-level educational programs to current and former NFL players.

The Kelley School will offer NFL players a unique model that will guide them from initial career development through professional and certificate programs and ultimately to an MBA degree.

“For more than a quarter century, the Kelley School has provided customized programs that have met the needs of many students within a variety of corporate and educational settings,” says Idalene Kesner, dean of the Kelley School and the Frank P. Popoff Chair of Strategic Management.

“Our leadership and innovation in delivering online programs provides the flexibility to design a winning experience for these accomplished athletes, many of whom will one day transition to new careers away from the football field,” Kesner adds.

Among the tools that will be available to players is the Kelley School’s acclaimed Me Inc. program, which enables participants to gain a better understanding of their goals and identifies a structured path toward attaining them. The program includes career coaching and career services.

After completion of the initial career development program, players may continue and enroll in online, noncredit programs on specialty topics such as personal finance, real estate, wealth management and entrepreneurship.

Upon completion of a noncredit professional program, players interested in developing more expertise will be able to enroll in a four-course certificate program. Many players will be able to directly enroll in the credit-bearing certificate programs as well.

Credits earned through the certificate programs will be transferable toward a 30-credit Master of Science degree or a 45-credit MBA. The programs will be delivered in a blended format that includes in-residence and online components.

A key feature of the NFLPA-Kelley MBA program will be the Kelley Capstone Experience, which puts teams of students to work on real-world strategic projects. This will provide students with an opportunity to apply skills and knowledge acquired in the MBA program to actual business problems that directly relate to each person’s goals and objectives.

Those in the NFLPA-Kelley MBA program also will have an opportunity to participate in the school’s global immersion courses, which present students with opportunities to understand and address problems faced by businesses in an emerging market. Currently the program is undertaking projects in India, Myanmar, Botswana, Ghana and South Africa.

All graduates of the NFLPA-Kelley MBA program who are interested in pursuing corporate careers will receive support from the same career services available to other Kelley graduates. In its most recent survey of MBA programs, Bloomberg Businessweek ranked Kelley No. 1 in terms of student satisfaction, career services and teaching.

“We are excited about the new opportunity the Indiana University Kelley School of Business is offering our players,” says NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith. “We pride ourselves in helping our members be knowledgeable about the business of football and putting them on the right path to succeed off the field. This relationship will achieve both.”

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Tuck School Creates New Global Insight Requirement

Beginning in fall 2015, students at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth will be required to complete an immersive global experience as part of their MBA education, the school announced earlier this week. The …

Tuck School of Business

Beginning in fall 2015, students at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth will be required to complete an immersive global experience as part of their MBA education, the school announced earlier this week. The new Tuck Global Insight Requirement, which goes into effect for the class of 2017, aims to ensure that every student at Tuck receives the global immersion they need to lead in today’s business environment.

“The world has become much more global,” says Phillip C. Stocken, associate dean for the MBA program at Tuck. “As a result, we believe our graduates must have a global business capability—a global mindset—to successfully navigate the different cultures, countries, and markets in which they will inevitably work. There is no better way to do this than spending time on the ground in another country.”

To satisfy the new requirement, students will choose from an array of carefully-designed, credit-bearing immersive courses that will provide them with the skills and knowledge required to solve problems effectively across cultures and lead in diverse business environments.

Each course will be faculty-led and include pre-travel orientation; an immersive experience in a country that is new to the student; and reflection. Like all MBA courses at Tuck, these will be academically rigorous and boast a high degree of faculty-student interaction. Qualifying courses currently include OnSite Global Consulting, a global First-Year Project, and Global Insight Expeditions.

The requirement extends to all MBA candidates what is already an integral part of the learning experience for a majority of students at Tuck. Nearly 67 percent of the class of 2014 reported spending time in a country that was new to them during their time at Tuck, and demand for such experiences is expected to grow in the future.

Matthew Slaughter, associate dean for faculty and the Signal Companies’ Professor of Management, says, “Making an immersive global experience a required part of the curriculum strengthens this commitment to ensure that every Tuck student receives outstanding preparation for the global leadership that businesses are today seeking.”

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2014 Best Business Schools for Hispanics

HispanicBusiness recently announced the 2014 ranking of the best business schools for diversity practices. The rankings look at Hispanic graduate enrollment, full-time Hispanic faculty in the MBA programs, and the percent of MBA degrees earned …

HispanicBusiness recently announced the 2014 ranking of the best business schools for diversity practices. The rankings look at Hispanic graduate enrollment, full-time Hispanic faculty in the MBA programs, and the percent of MBA degrees earned by Hispanics.

According to the editors, enrollment is just one piece of the puzzle though. Some schools on this list do have relatively lower Hispanic enrollment rates than schools that didn’t make the list, but HispanicBusiness is also looking at faculty numbers and programs to attract and retain Hispanic students. The schools appearing on this list are well-rounded, say the editors, and have made notable efforts to engage the Hispanic community.

2014 Top Ten Best Business Schools for Hispanics

1. University of Texas at El Paso

Total graduate enrollment 275
Hispanic graduate enrollment 176
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 64.0%
Full-time MBA school faculty 60
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 16
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 26.7%

2. New York University Stern School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 786
Hispanic graduate enrollment 53
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 6.7%
Full-time MBA school faculty 177
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 6
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 3.4%

3. UT McCombs School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 511
Hispanic graduate enrollment 35
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 6.8%
Full-time MBA school faculty 95
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 4
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 4.2%

4. University of New Mexico Anderson School of Management

Total graduate enrollment 622
Hispanic graduate enrollment 224
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 36.0%
Full-time MBA school faculty 61
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 8
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 13.1%

5. Stanford Graduate School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 809
Hispanic graduate enrollment 44
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 5.4%
Full-time MBA school faculty 122
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 2
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 1.6%

6. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 497
Hispanic graduate enrollment 26
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 5.2%
Full-time MBA school faculty 81
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 3
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 3.7%

7. UV Darden School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 628
Hispanic graduate enrollment 31
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 4.9%
Full-time MBA school faculty 109
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 4
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 3.7%

8. University of Miami School of Business Administration

Total graduate enrollment 111
Hispanic graduate enrollment 22
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 19.8%
Full-time MBA school faculty 52
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 10
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 19.2%

9. Yale School of Management

Total graduate enrollment 552
Hispanic graduate enrollment 30
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 5.4%
Full-time MBA school faculty 68
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 2
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 2.9%

10. University of Texas at San Antonio College of Business

Total graduate enrollment 226
Hispanic graduate enrollment 41
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 18.1%
Full-time MBA school faculty 92
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 11
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 12.0%

Universities still have some work to do before the number of Hispanics at the graduate level corresponds to the size of the Hispanic population in this country, note the editors of HispanicBusiness, but the organization sees the trend both in student enrollment and full-time faculty moving in the right direction.

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Berkeley MBA Program Appoints Assistant Dean

Dean Rich Lyons of the UC Berkeley MBA program at the Haas School of Business has appointed Stephanie Fujii, MBA ’04, as the first assistant dean of the Full-time MBA Program and Admissions, a newly created …

Dean Rich Lyons of the UC Berkeley MBA program at the Haas School of Business has appointed Stephanie Fujii, MBA ’04, as the first assistant dean of the Full-time MBA Program and Admissions, a newly created position at Haas.

Berkeley MBA

An alumna and nine-year veteran at Haas, Fujii served most recently as executive director of Full-time MBA Admissions. In her new role, she will oversee both the full-time MBA admissions and the full-time MBA program office.

Fujii has held a number of roles at Haas over the past decade. As executive director of admissions for the Full-time MBA program, she led her team in integrating the school’s Defining Principles into the admissions process. She also helped streamline the admissions process, moving to an online evaluation system, and consolidating application rounds from four to three.

Fujii and her team have strengthened the diversity of the applicant pool, significantly increasing applications from international candidates, women, underrepresented U.S. minorities, and military candidates in particular. In fact, full-time MBA students who began classes at the Haas School of Business last week included a record 43 percent women as well as a record number of international students, the school reports.

“Our goal every year is to strengthen the diversity of the applicant pool across many dimensions, and we are thrilled to see our efforts reflected in this class,” says Fujii. “We continually hear from our students and alumni that working with people who think differently, and who have experienced the world differently, was critical to their development as leaders.”

Berkeley Haas has recently increased efforts to build relationships between newly admitted women, female faculty, and alumnae in leadership roles as a way to build a sense of community among students, particularly women.

Akilah Huguley, MBA ’15 and the class vice president of admissions, says there have been many thoughtful conversations over the past year about gender balance and why it’s important to MBA programs across the country and specifically to the Haas community. “I don’t believe any of us can say we weren’t surprised to see that 43 percent of this class is female. But what a pleasant surprise it is,” she says. “However, I do not believe this number happened by chance.”

As part of the new Full-time MBA Program and Admissions department structure, Erin Kellerhals will become the executive director of Full-time MBA admissions and Dan Sullivan will be the director of the Full-time MBA Program Office.

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