Category Archives: Carnegie Mellon Tepper Advice

Tuesday Tips: Carnegie Mellon Tepper School Fall 2017 MBA Essay Tips

Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business has posted the essay questions for the 2016-2017 application, which includes only one required essay. Tepper offers several options for completing your MBA, from Full-Time MBA to Part-Time …

CMU tepper MBA essay TIPS

Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business has posted the essay questions for the 2016-2017 application, which includes only one required essay.

Tepper offers several options for completing your MBA, from Full-Time MBA to Part-Time On-Campus MBA to Part-Time Online Hybrid MBA. The Tepper community is diverse with various goals, and Tepper is not looking for one particular profile, but rather candidates who are willing to engage with a tight-knit community and are interested in a highly analytical course structure.

Questions about your Tepper MBA application? Contact us to learn more about how Stacy Blackman Consulting can help.

REQUIRED ESSAY
Imagine that you meet up with a member of the admission committee at an airport while on a layover. You have an opportunity to make a memorable impression. Use this essay to introduce yourself. Include any information that you believe is important for the committee member to know about you both professionally and personally. (Maximum 300-350 words, 12-point font, double-spaced)

This is the only required essay for CMU Tepper’s MBA application, and it will be important to explain anything about your personal and professional background that can enhance the data Tepper’s admissions committee has already received from your resume, academic scores and recommendations.

Think about describing the key moments that have been formative in your path thus far, and that are relevant to your pursuit of an MBA now.

As you consider what to describe about your professional background you should focus on accomplishments and filter your experiences with your future goals. For example, if you are seeking an MBA to make a career switch in either function or industry, focus on career stories that show a transferable element to the way you work.

You may want to highlight your analytical skills or how much you enjoy tackling tough issues at work. If you are looking for an MBA to enhance your current career path then you may want to highlight the moments you are most proud of in your career history.

On the personal side, CMU Tepper has a small and close-knit community, and your personality and background will be of interest to the admissions committee. What would your future classmates and professors want to know about you? How might you contribute to Tepper both while in school and after graduation? To add a solid example, think about the formative experiences in your life that might illustrate how you think and behave in a community.

OPTIONAL ESSAY
• Use this essay to convey important information that you may not have been otherwise able to convey. This may include unexplained resume gaps, context for recommender selection, etc.

• If you are a re-applicant, explain how your candidacy has strengthened since your last application.

CMU Tepper’s optional essay provides room to explain any important context to potential issues in your application. As outlined, resume gaps, a recommendation that is from someone other than a current or former supervisor, etc.

Other possible explanations may include academic issues like low grades in quantitative classes or academic probation. A low GMAT score or other profile issue may be worth addressing if applicable.

Re-applicants should always use this space to showcase a strengthened candidacy. If you have improved your profile with a stronger GMAT score or new grades from quantitative classes, that is great information to highlight. If you have increased your responsibilities at work, refined career goals or added new extracurricular activities those are also valid updates to communicate.

CMU Tepper is not asking for you to explain anything you want in this essay, and it will be wisest to stick with the two categories of information specifically outlined. The required essay is open-ended enough to provide the space to offer all other information needed for an admissions decision.

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Stacy Blackman’s B-School Buzz

After taking a bit of a breather to feature other MBA-related news on Fridays, we’re back to check in with what some of Stacy Blackman’s B-School Buzz bloggers have been up to lately. From thoughts …

After taking a bit of a breather to feature other MBA-related news on Fridays, we’re back to check in with what some of Stacy Blackman’s B-School Buzz bloggers have been up to lately. From thoughts on the new team-based application component at Wharton to the state of diversity at b-schools to how exactly does one determine “fit”, our contributors have lots of interesting viewpoints to share.

Assessing Wharton’s new “team-based” component—Many business schools have made significant changes to their MBA applications this year, and the UPenn Wharton School is no exception. Sanket shares his take on the new team-based assessment component, saying that he applauds its use, because “it is much more authentic to see the applicants live in a performance.”

Six out of 576— The call for diversity in business schools rings out loud and clear in campuses across the country; however, the reality can often be very disappointing. Cheetarah 1980 describes the situation at Chicago Booth School of Business, where she is one of  only six black women in the entire Class of 2014. Read her post to learn why women of color may be wary of Booth, and why they should give the school a second look.

 What is Fit?–The idea of “fit” as it pertains to business school leaves many applicants in a cloud of confusion. Sassafras uses the metaphors of food, ritual, philosophy, government and diversity to explain what MBA candidates should consider in order to choose schools that align with their own needs and interests.

 The importance of a top undergrad degree—The Military to Business blog recently provided a dose of clarity to enlisted personnel planning on applying to business school in the future.  The author believes that the main thing holding non-commissioned offers (NCOs) back is not military rank but lesser-ranked undergraduate degrees. His advice? Consider finishing your last two years on campus of a top national program and apply to b-school from there.

Do you have a b-school-centric blog? Want it featured on B-School Buzz? Email me at buzz@StacyBlackman.com.

Posted in BSchool Buzz, Carnegie Mellon Tepper Advice |

Tuesday Tips: Carnegie Mellon MBA Essay Tips

The Carnegie Mellon MBA program is a welcoming environment with a diverse community of students.  Carnegie Mellon MBA admissions also demonstrates transparency in the process, and even provides a new tip each month for applicants.  The resources …

The Carnegie Mellon MBA program is a welcoming environment with a diverse community of students.  Carnegie Mellon MBA admissions also demonstrates transparency in the process, and even provides a new tip each month for applicants.  The resources available though admissions are invaluable as you prepare your application strategy and approach for Tepper.

1. What are your short term and long term goals? How will a Carnegie Mellon MBA help you achieve these goals? (Please include any information regarding what steps you have taken to learn more about Tepper.) (two-page limit)

Tepper allows plenty of space for you to answer this standard career goals essay. As you would approach the same question for Wharton, Columbia or Kellogg, start by brainstorming your long-term goal, the short-term goal that will lead you there, and the MBA that will provide the bridge between your past experiences and your career vision. You will want to demonstrate that you have thought about your goals and done any necessary research to understand the steps to accomplish them.

In addition, Tepper asks you to describe how you have learned about the Carnegie Mellon MBA. This section of the question clearly asks for your level of engagement and interest in the school, and it will be worth citing specific steps you have taken to learn about the program. Personal interaction with members of the Carnegie Mellon MBA community will be especially impressive, though certainly demonstrating familiarity through research and understanding the program will be helpful as well.

2. Describe an instance in which you made an impact as part of a team or as an individual. How did this experience help shape you as a team member or leader and how will it enable you to contribute to the diverse Carnegie Mellon MBA community? (two-page limit)

This question seeks to understand your leadership style, and allows you two options to demonstrate your own personal leadership approach. You may choose an example that is team focused, or focus on an individual accomplishment that demonstrates leadership.

To be most effective in this essay, make sure you answer all three parts: the situation, how the situation changed you, and how you will contribute to the Carnegie Mellon MBA program. You will want to describe the situation succinctly and specifically. Provide examples and demonstrate how you are a strong leader or team member. Then you will discuss what you learned from the situation and how you have applied your learnings to subsequent experiences, therefore shaping your overall leadership style. Finally, you will want to demonstrate how this experience will benefit Tepper.

3. Please answer two of the following three questions or statements: (two-page limit)

A. Describe an obstacle you have faced in your professional or academic life. How did you overcome this obstacle and how did it foster your development?

Overcoming obstacles successfully is a great way to demonstrate persistence, a positive attitude, and the ability to learn from challenging situations. When discussing the situation, make sure you were able to learn from the situation and preferably turn it around to end up with an ultimately positive outcome. If you could not turnaround the specific situation, how did you apply what you learned to new situations, to make them ultimately successful? You will also need to address your development as a professional or student, and how this challenging situation taught you something about yourself or was an opportunity to mature as a person.

B. Describe a time in which your ethics were challenged. How did you deal with the situation and what did you learn from it?

Ethical dilemma situations are one way for the admissions committee to understand your unique moral filter and how you deal with challenging situations. Choose your ethical dilemma carefully to make sure it is not a situation with a clear cut answer, leading to little ability to learn. Ethical dilemma’s can be tricky for applicants, and are the sort of question you will want to seek several readers to comment upon, to ensure you appear to be honest and mature in the example.

C. One thing people would be surprised to know about me is”¦

This question is entirely open ended, providing an excellent opportunity for you to put in anything you have not been able to communicate to adcomm in the various other essays. This type of question is perfectly suited for personal topics, and could be the perfect opportunity to reveal an interesting or diverse fact about yourself. Be sure to explain the surprising attribute and comment upon why people would be surprised to know it about you.

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