Category Archives: General

Harvard Business School Tops Bloomberg’s 2016 US Rankings

Bloomberg Businessweek has released its 2016 ranking of the best U.S. business schools, based on data compiled from more than 1,000 recruiters, 15,000 alumni, and 9,000 recent graduates. Harvard Business School claims the number one spot …

Bloomberg Businessweek has released its 2016 ranking of the best U.S. business schools, based on data compiled from more than 1,000 recruiters, 15,000 alumni, and 9,000 recent graduates. Harvard Business School claims the number one spot among 87 full-time U.S. MBA programs. Stanford Graduate School of Business is number two, and Duke’s Fuqua School of Business is number three. This is the second year in a row that Harvard came out on top—and this time by a wider margin.

Harvard Business School tops bloomberg ranking

HBS was rated No.1 by the more than 1,000 corporate recruiters, and No.3 among alumni. Its graduates left with the second highest salaries. Competition for the No.2 spot was particularly close this year, with Stanford edging out Duke-Fuqua by .08 percentage point for its highest ever Businessweek rank.

Bloomberg’s Top Ten U.S. Full-Time MBA Programs 

  1. Harvard Business School
  2. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  3. Duke University Fuqua School of Business
  4. Chicago Booth School of Business
  5. Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth
  6. University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School
  7. MIT Sloan School of Management
  8. Rice University’s Jones Graduate School of Business
  9. Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management
  10. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business

“We continue last year’s focus on how well the schools channel their graduates into good jobs and, with a new survey of MBAs after graduation, offer more insight into what grads can expect from their careers,”  writes Bloomberg’s Lance Lambert.

Highlights of the 2016 ranking include:

  • Harvard had more than a nine point lead on its nearest competitor this year, up from less than two points in 2015.
  • Indiana University received the highest score among recent graduates.
  • Rutgers University’s 2015 grads had the highest job placement rate.
  • The University of Michigan does not appear in the top ten for the first time since Businessweek started the rankings in 1988.
  • This is the first year that Rice University has ranked in the top ten.
  • Alumni, recent graduates and recruiters all gave the University of Texas at Dallas better scores, helping to propel it 13 spots.

The Bloomberg ranking methodology includes an employer survey (35% of score), alumni survey (30%), student survey (15%), job placement rate (10%), and starting salary (10%).

“Our Full-Time MBA rankings comprise five elements. So it’s possible to rank highly without knocking every category out of the park,” Lambert explains. “For example, Stanford which is the No. 2 school on our list, ranked No. 57 for job placement.”

This year’s rankings includes 15 U.S. MBA programs that weren’t ranked last year, moving the list from 74 programs in 2015 to 87 in 2016. “With so many new programs added to the list, we saw a lot of movement throughout the rankings,”  Lambert notes.

The top 30 full-time U.S. MBA programs will be highlighted in the print issue of Bloomberg Businessweek on newsstands Friday, November 18, 2016.

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How to Find Your Business School Best Fit: Hear it From the Alumnae

If you plan to be in the New York City area on Thursday November 17th, I invite you to join us for an SBC Consulting-sponsored event, B-School: Finding an A+ Fit. Whether you are currently …

If you plan to be in the New York City area on Thursday November 17th, I invite you to join us for an SBC Consulting-sponsored event, B-School: Finding an A+ Fit.
business school selection

Whether you are currently in the process of applying to business school or would like to share your own experiences, the networking opportunities alone are reason to attend.

Featuring alumnae from The Wharton School, Harvard Business School, Stanford Graduate School of Business and The Kellogg School of Management who went on to become CEOs, founders, and leading brand representatives, this event will showcase these hand-picked, prestigious alumnae and their achievements post-graduation.

The Details

When: Thursday, November 17th from 7:00pm – 8:30pm

Where: WeWork, 300 Park Ave. 12th floor, New York, NY 10022

Admission: $10 | Covers refreshments and snacks

Agenda for the Evening

7:00 – 7:20pm | 20 minutes for networking, drinking & snacking

7:20 – 7:30pm | Welcome and intro of speakers

7:30 – 8:00pm | Q&A

8:00 – 8:15pm | Audience Q & A

8:15 – 8:30pm | Wrap-up & final networking (+ more drinking, snacking)

Featured Speakers

From The Unversity of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School: Lara Crystal, Co-CEO & Co-Founder of Minibar

From Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of MangementJodi Genshaft, Senior Brand Manager at Chobani and Kelsey Recht, CEO & Founder of VenueBook

From Stanford Graduate School of BusinessLaura Holliday, Chief Marketing Officer at Zola

From Harvard Business SchoolJill Applebaum and Jillian Ressler, Co-Founders of Spruce & Co

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Get your tickets today and come ready with questions for this intimate evening of networking and discussion!

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Ask the AdCom: What are the Most Popular Student Clubs?

Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we …

Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we know our readers will enjoy seeing  a different side of what makes these guys tick.

This fun space is not really about the application process but more about real-life topics, like what’s a good book to readbest place to study, where you can find a killer meal near campus, and all the fun stuff happening at b-school that creates those lifelong, cherished memories for MBA students.

We hope you become inspired, too!

MBA clubs

Today’s Question is: What are some fun student clubs?

Kelly R. Wilson, Executive Director of Admissions at CMU Tepper School of Business, says the most popular student clubs are the Culinary Club, Brewmeisters Club, Poker Club, Robber Barons, Tepper Cares, and the Soccer Club.

Melissa Fogerty, Director of Admissions at Yale School of Management: The Design & Innovation Club, one of the largest clubs at the SOM, introduces students to design frameworks, ideation strategies, and the value of rapid prototyping and experimentation. Through workshops, club members put their D&I and integrated MBA curriculum into action by completing real world, hands-on client projects for organizations like SYPartners and IDEO.

Their fun social events include drink and draw, game nights, Closing Bell (Thursday night happy hour), and #openEVANS. They also facilitate relationships and career opportunities with design organizations and design thinking leaders through job treks, Mock Madness, career coaching, and visiting speakers from Disney Imagineering, Dalberg Design Impact Group, PepsiCo, Citi Ventures, and others.

One of SOM’s longest-running traditions is the Internship Fund, which has provided hundreds of thousands of dollars in stipends to students interning in the nonprofit and public sectors and each year subsidizes approximately 10% of the class. In 2016, 96% of the Class of 2017 supported the Internship Fund by participating in the Internship Fund Auction, Fit for Thought (a student-run Evans Hall gym), and Student Fundraising Week.

The popular, themed Internship Fund Auction is attended by over 300 students, faculty, and staff, and past auction prizes have included skydiving with a professor, a trip to a Guatemalan coffee farm and nature preserve owned by SOM alumni, a week in the Virgin Islands, cooking lessons with a professional chef, golf with Dean Snyder, and a behind the scenes look at NBA Entertainment.

Allison Jamison, Admissions Director at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business: The Wine Club is a very popular student club that hosts an Around the World event every term.  Students say it’s a great way to meet and get to know other classmates through this event in which hundreds of students participate.

There is also Fuqua Vision, our version of “Saturday Night Live,” which hosts a spoof show each term, and the Culinary Club, that hosts potlucks for those who like to cook.  The Latin American Student Association (LASA) is famous for its barbeque parties, and the Improv Club is cited by our international students as being a great way to break through communication barriers and learn some good jokes.

Morgan Bernstein, Executive Director of Full-Time MBA Admissions at UC Berkeley-Haas School of Business: We have a number of industry-specific clubs that support students in their job searches. Some of our social- and community-focused clubs include Q@Haas for LGBT students and allies; the Haas Beer Club, the Wine Industry Club, and Culinary Club which take advantage of the Bay Area’s foodie community; an Investment Club & even a Golf Club. Women in Leadership offers a fantastic community, and the Haas Partners Club welcomes students with partners and families.

John Roeder, Assistant Dean Graduate Admissions  at SMU Cox School of Business: The Cox Wine club is a popular club at Cox.  It is an educational and social origination focused on increasing students’ knowledge, respect, and enthusiasm for wine, spirits & craft beers through formal tastings, education, and networking events alongside industry professionals. Most students will be involved in intramural sports as a way to de-stress on throughout the semester.

Judi Byers, Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Cornell’s Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management polled students for their recommendations:

  • Peter Su, MBA ’17: Johnson on Tap, Greater China Business Club
  • Sydney Chernish, MBA ’16: As former club president, my vote is for the Wine Club. We meet bi-weekly for education about wine production, tasting and the industry.
  • Najeen Riazi,MBA ’17: Wine Club for the Luxury Champagne tastings, Johnson on Tap for the social aspect, and Hispanic American Business Leaders (HABLA).
  • Daniel Greenhaw, MBA ’16: Johnson on Tap

Rodrigo Malta, Director of Admissions at UT McCombs School of Business: Some of our most popular social clubs include the Graduate Wine Club, The MBA Brew Club, and one that is uniquely Austin – The MBA Live Music Association!

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It seems like most of the recommended clubs included a “spirited” theme, right? Cheers to that! Look out for the #AskAdCom in our social media channels, and we’ll see you again next week when we check in to Ask the AdCom about popular annual activities on campus.

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Why U.S. Applicants Should Consider MBA Programs Abroad

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News. As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, tomorrow’s business professionals will need to develop an adaptive mindset that allows them to successfully navigate a …

international MBA programs

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.

As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, tomorrow’s business professionals will need to develop an adaptive mindset that allows them to successfully navigate a variety of markets, languages and cultures.

We’ve seen a lot of growth lately in the range of international full-time, part-time and executive MBA courses aimed at U.S. students looking for a global business school experience, and there’s no better way to expand your horizons than by studying in another country.

While top U.S. business schools continue to dominate many rankings, programs at global universities hold their own when it comes to prestige and quality. Of the top MBA programs in the world, there are typically high-ranking programs outside of the U.S., including the University of Navarra’s IESE Business School in Spain, the Hautes Etudes Commerciales (HEC) Paris and the University of Queensland Business School in Australia.

But what sets apart an international MBA? Student body diversity is one.

European business schools, for example, boast a roughly 80 percent non-national ratio, compared to 30 percent at their U.S. counterparts. Whether these programs include class trips to work in emerging economies or offer a cohort with students from numerous different countries, they compete on equal footing with the best North American schools.

Another attractive characteristic for U.S. students is that many of the highly ranked business programs in Europe are just one year. Though the shorter MBA program means a more grueling schedule, many feel it’s worth the trade-off because it translates into just one year of foregone salary and the possibility of students getting their educational investment back in less than three years.

You’ll always have the highest exposure to jobs in your geographic area, so keep that top of mind as you think about your career goals and fields of interest. If you already know that you want to work in Asia, Europe, the Middle East or Latin America, you’d be better off choosing a local school where you can network directly with employers.

Many international MBA programs are offered in English, though fluency in the local language greatly enhances your candidacy when applying. English-language MBA programs at IESE Business School and HEC Paris, for example, offer students a chance to strengthen their Spanish or French while learning how commerce works in the host countries.

In general, though, overseas MBA programs prefer applicants who can point to previous professional or study abroad experience, since this demonstrates that you already know how to work with different cultures and are more likely to enrich the experience of others in the cohort.

INSEAD Business School in France opened a second campus in Singapore in 2000, clearly a shift to specifically target Asia and the Pacific Rim. Asian universities in turn have stepped up their game when it comes to competing for students.

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, one of the region’s highly recognized graduate schools of business, has joined forces with China Europe International Business School in Shanghai and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore to raise their visibility in North America and Europe and interest more Western candidates to Asia to earn MBA degrees. Lower program costs and Asia’s ever-increasing economic relevance, plus the use of English as the language of instruction, makes this trio particularly appealing to students in the West.

Latin America, meanwhile, is a relatively young MBA market that offers substantial growth opportunities and an affordable management education compared to its North American counterparts. According to the most recent QS Top MBA Report on the global job market, hiring is particularly insular in Latin America, and the percentage of employers who look for talent within their own region is second only to the U.S. and Canada.

The region’s rapidly growing economy – notably in Mexico, Brazil and Peru – means increased opportunities for business and trade, and MBAs who are comfortable with the local language as well as with the region’s social and cultural norms will thrive.

Some of the schools recognized throughout the world are the EGADE Business School and IPADE Business School in Mexico, the CENTRUM Católica Business School in Peru and FGV’s São Paulo School of Business Administration in Brazil.

Whether your goal is to establish yourself ahead of U.S. candidates for international jobs or simply to have a degree that carries the cachet of regional knowledge, choosing to pursue an MBA overseas give you the opportunity for a truly transformational experience, leading to a greater understanding of yourself and how business operates around the world.

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Advice for First-Years from an HBS Alumna

There’s nothing like advice that comes straight from the source, so if Harvard Business School is on your short list, you shouldn’t miss this great post published recently in the student newspaper The Harbus. In What …

There’s nothing like advice that comes straight from the source, so if Harvard Business School is on your short list, you shouldn’t miss this great post published recently in the student newspaper The Harbus.

Harvard Business School students

In What I Wish I’d Known This Time Last Year, Rahima Dosani (MBA ’16)  offers advice for first-year students, AKA RCs, which she wrote during her EC year.  We’ll share some excerpts here, but definitely check out her entire piece for some really helpful tips for students just getting their bearings as they settle in on campus.

You are your own worst critic. No one remembers a comment for more than 2 minutes after you make it. Sometimes not even that long. Don’t be afraid to raise your hand and say what you are thinking, and don’t beat yourself up afterward. Your opinions matter.

Stay in touch with your family and friends. In the craziness that is RC year, it is so easy to forget to call home and forget about your high school, college, and work friends who have been by your side for years. They may not really understand what your life is like, but keeping them close will be restorative and grounding for you in so many ways.

Quality over quantity.  Ask yourself: “Who would I want to keep in touch with or take a trip with many years after graduation?” Those are the people you should spend most of your time with. Be friendly with everyone, but don’t exhaust yourself trying to build close friendships with 95 people. 

Ain’t no shame in getting a 3. Your life and career will be filled with just as much meaning, fulfillment, success, and happiness as it would be if you had gotten a 2. Guaranteed.

Professors are awesome. Share with them your concerns or thoughts about participation, class content, or just life. They value connecting with you and can be an incredible source of inspiration and comfort.

You do belong here. When you feel like you don’t fit in, can’t figure out FIN for the life of you, and don’t see things the same way as other people, just remember that’s the value you bring to the table. And other people are definitely feeling the same way – you’re not alone.

HBS doesnt need to be the best two years of your life. It’s awesome if it is. But it’s totally okay if it’s not. It just needs to be worth it for you. So “do you.” Invest in what you really enjoy or want to learn. Do what you need to do to make this time here meaningful for you.

You may also be interested in:

5 Common Interview Questions from Harvard Business School

Image by HBS1908 (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0 

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