Category Archives: School News

Stanford, Synonymous with Satisfaction

Super salary doesn’t equal satisfaction, Forbes reveals in its latest ranking of the most satisfied MBA graduates. While Tuck School of Business, the Wharton School, and Chicago Booth alumni typically receive paychecks in the $200,000 …

Stanford MBA ranking

Super salary doesn’t equal satisfaction, Forbes reveals in its latest ranking of the most satisfied MBA graduates. While Tuck School of Business, the Wharton School, and Chicago Booth alumni typically receive paychecks in the $200,000 range,  Forbes says these graduates gave middling marks on job satisfaction. Stanford Graduate School of Business meanwhile takes the number-one spot for the third year running, and also topped Forbes‘s ROI ranking in 2013.

Forbes surveyed 17,000 grads from the Class of 2008 and heard back from 4,600 last year for its biennial b-school ranking. Their methodology considers satisfaction five years after graduation, when students have had time to reflect on their educational experience and how they compare to other MBAs in the workforce.

Ten 10 Schools with the Most Satisfied Graduates

  1. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  2. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  3. Carnegie Mellon Tepper School of Business
  4. Michigan State Eli Broad College of Business
  5. Indiana University Kelley School of Business
  6. Dartmouth Tuck School of Business
  7. Duke University Fuqua School of Business
  8. Rice Jones Graduate School of Business
  9. Wisconsin School of Business
  10. Chicago Booth School of Business

Both Stanford and second-place UC Berkeley Haas’s top employers are heavy on consulting and tech led by Google, eBay, McKinsey, BCG and Deloitte. Survey respondents appreciated how their schools helped prepare them for entrepreneurship and form global networks they will leverage throughout their careers.

This story appears in the May 5th issue of Forbes, but you can preview the MBA satisfaction rankings by following the link above.

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Round 3 Update from Harvard Business School

Just two more days, Round 3 applicants to Harvard Business School. That’s right, your fate will be known at noon Boston time, when the admissions team sends out both interview invitations and release notifications. According …

HBS round 3

Just two more days, Round 3 applicants to Harvard Business School. That’s right, your fate will be known at noon Boston time, when the admissions team sends out both interview invitations and release notifications.

According to the latest update by admissions director Dee Leopold, all Round 3 applicants will hear something on Thursday, April 17th. Interviews will take place via Skype, or on campus on April 28th and May 2nd. Decisions on all interviewed Round 3 candidates will go out at noon on May 14th.

Leopold also says the Class of 2017 application will go live in mid-June, but we can expect to see the essay and recommender questions in advance.

Good luck to all the Round 3 applicants out there, as well as those on the HBS waitlist.

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Round 3 Myth-Busting by Harvard Business School

Harvard Business School Enters Online Learning

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New Georgetown MBA Course Focuses on Women Leaders

Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business has further expanded its efforts to groom young female leaders through a new MBA course titled Developing Women Leaders: Cultivating your Human and Social Capital, the school recently announced. Professor Catherine …

Georgetown MBA

Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business has further expanded its efforts to groom young female leaders through a new MBA course titled Developing Women Leaders: Cultivating your Human and Social Capital, the school recently announced.

Professor Catherine Tinsley, who has been instrumental in building the Georgetown University Women’s Leadership Initiative (GUWLI), created the six-week course. The GUWLI is a program that aims to cultivate young female leaders and connect them with already established female leaders out in the world.

A series of conferences, networking events, and panels inspired Tinsley to create a course based on the three activities that she has found helpful in advancing and empowering women: rigorous research documenting gender dynamics, active workshops targeting specific practical skills women need to build their human and social capital, and listening to other women.

Tinsley notes that with all the technical skills and experience students bring from their previous modules, “This course is designed not to help them get a job, but to help them advance once they have a job.”

The second-year MBA course, which began in March, will be structured around the six human and social capital skills that Tinsley believes everyone needs to advance in their careers.

The course title might seem to indicate it is intended solely for women, but Tinsley says the examined skill set is one from which women and men both would benefit. As Tinsley comments, “There’s no skill that women need to have that men don’t need to have, so this course is about advancement and building your own capital.”

Though there is a great deal of advice about career advancement readily available to women today, very little of it is based on organized research. Similar courses on female leadership that exist at other institutions are generally based on specific case studies and focus on where real women have succeed and where they have faltered.

Developing Women Leaders differs in that it is fundamentally research-based course, drawing on results from large sample sizes.  Guest speakers will offer students context for these results and insights gleaned from years of experience in the business world.

In the first class, 30 women have enrolled from the full female cohort of 81, but no male students have yet enrolled, the Financial Times notes in a profile piece on Tinsley.

The  professor hopes they will eventually choose to join the course, telling Financial Times that men need to be open to discuss gender issues and what those issues mean to them. “It would be interesting and challenging to include them – it is a dialogue that needs to take place,” she says.

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UMD Smith School to Offer Blended Part-Time MBA

Part-time MBA students in the nation’s capital no longer have to choose between online and classroom delivery. Starting in fall 2014, the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business will offer the region’s …

Part-time MBA students in the nation’s capital no longer have to choose between online and classroom delivery. Starting in fall 2014, the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business will offer the region’s first blended program for working professionals at its Washington campus.

The more flexible format will require participants in the school’s D.C. weekend program to meet on two Saturdays per month instead of three for traditional classroom instruction. Web-based learning modules designed by Smith faculty will provide the remainder of the content, allowing Smith students more latitude to structure their schedules. Participants in the pioneering program can complete their degree in two years.

“This eliminates 30 percent of the classroom time, giving students a huge amount of flexibility with their own lives,” Edward Lavino, Smith’s director of admissions for part-time MBA programs, said in a news release. “That three-Saturday-per month commitment takes away from an already small amount of free time from the program’s typical student — a 27- to 28-year-old professional.”

He said the blended format also allows assigned reading and skills practice to be designated for off-site engagement.

“About one-third of classroom time is currently consumed by students practicing skills via laptops or through other teacher-led exercises, and case studies sometimes are read in class prior to group discussion,” Lavino explained. “Now students will be able to engage in the same work at a quicker pace — off-site and on their own.”

Ken White, Smith’s associate dean of MBA and Master of Science programs, said flexibility is a major element of the program, but so is rigor.

“Students in the blended program will have the same classes and same professors available as in our full-time MBA program,” he said. “This is a high-quality program created for busy working professionals.”

The response among working professionals in the region has been positive. “Every applicant and current D.C. weekend student is on board,” Lavino said.

Upcoming application deadlines for the program are April 14 and June 2.

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Smith School Appoints New Dean with Global Outlook

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Kellogg School Takes 1st Place in Sustainable Investing Challenge

A team of students from the Kellogg School of Management has taken first place in the 2014 Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge with their proposed investment vehicle that would remediate contaminated land in the U.S. …

A team of students from the Kellogg School of Management has taken first place in the 2014 Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge with their proposed investment vehicle that would remediate contaminated land in the U.S. through reforestation.

This preeminent global competition is geared for students to develop investment vehicles aiming at delivering positive social and environmental impact and competitive financial returns.

Last week at Morgan Stanley’s New York City headquarters, Kellogg’s Nicole Chavas, Nathen Holub, Laura Kimes and April Mendez presented their winning idea for the Fresh Coast Forest Fund, which would lease 25,000 acres of contaminated municipal land to plant poplar tree farms on contaminated urban and industrial sites. Poplars naturally clean and restore soil by absorbing toxins, and could be harvested for use as biomass or wood product.

As a collaboration among the Kellogg School of Management, INSEAD, and the Morgan Stanley Institute for Sustainable Investing, the competition seeks to identify the next generation of sustainable investing practitioners, connect emerging leaders with industry professionals, and foster even greater emphasis on sustainability at graduate schools around the world.

At last week’s event, ten finalist teams proposed investment vehicles addressing issues including agriculture, solar energy and sanitation. In February, more than 220 students from 39 schools in 10 different countries submitted prospectuses for the competition.

A team from the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business won second place for their proposal, myCatch, a lending vehicle that would provide loans to organizations on behalf of small-scale sustainable fisheries.

“It is exciting to see today’s students—tomorrow’s financial professionals—pushing the frontiers of financial innovation to achieve positive social or environmental impact,” says Jamie Jones, Director of Social Entrepreneurship at the Kellogg School of Management. “The young leaders who participated in the competition will be a driving force for the conversation about sustainable investing at their academic institutions.”

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How to Maximize Your MBA Experience

The MBA Student Voice blog of UCLA Anderson School of Management recently posted some great advice from second-year student Nathan Adelman on how to make the most of your MBA experience, and it rings true …

school-ucla-anderson

The MBA Student Voice blog of UCLA Anderson School of Management recently posted some great advice from second-year student Nathan Adelman on how to make the most of your MBA experience, and it rings true no matter where you eventually end up.

Adelman lists key lessons he’s learned while at Anderson, and we’ve summarized four of them below. For more of his thoughts on each subject, click over to the original post linked above.

Lesson 1: The difference between a good MBA experience and a great one is about $10,000.

No one is denying that business school is an expensive endeavor, but Adelman says ponying up an extra $10K will cover the international trips, clubs, and social events that will take your entire MBA experience to the next level.

“These experiences will impart to you a global perspective, lifelong friends, and a strong business network that will benefit you for the next 40 years of your career,” Adelman says.

Lesson 2: Not studying for a test is actually harder than studying for the test.

Getting straight A’s doesn’t open any more doors for your career path than getting B’s, Adelman says, who believes classes are the activity in business school that have had the least influence on landing his dream job.

“Once I was comfortable with that feeling, it enabled me to better manage my time and prioritize my commitments which in turn  allowed me to get the most out of my business school experience, inside and outside of the classroom,” he explains.

Lesson 3: Greater career focus yields more career opportunities.

Recruiting for multiple industries and job functions actually creates fewer opportunities for finding something you truly like, Adelman believes. Be as focused as possible, he urges, and take the time to go for something that really gets you excited.

“All this extra time allows you to focus on specializing in your specific area of interest.  This means you actually have the time to do industry research, network with people in the industry, and get to know the companies intimately – all things that you will actually talk about in your interview!” Adelman advises.

After all, he says, it’s much easier to help the “Restaurant Girl” or the “The Pharma Guy” than it is to help the “Maybe consulting, maybe marketing, maybe tech Guy.”

Lesson 4: Mentors cannot be assigned, they must be found.

While most schools have mentorship programs that pair students with someone experienced in their field of interest, Adelman believes the best mentorship relationships happen organically between people with an authentic connection both professional and personal.

“It is this personal connection that really separates an ‘advisor’ from a ‘mentor’, and also it cannot be faked,” he says. “So don’t be afraid to seek out those people whom you admire and want to emulate – odds are one of them will see something in you as well.”

You may also be interested in:

Maximize Your MBA Experience

Thoughts on the UCLA Anderson Interview

UCLA Anderson School of Management MBA Essay Tips

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