Category Archives: School News

Kellogg School Takes 1st Place in Sustainable Investing Challenge

A team of students from the Kellogg School of Management has taken first place in the 2014 Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge with their proposed investment vehicle that would remediate contaminated land in the U.S. …

A team of students from the Kellogg School of Management has taken first place in the 2014 Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge with their proposed investment vehicle that would remediate contaminated land in the U.S. through reforestation.

This preeminent global competition is geared for students to develop investment vehicles aiming at delivering positive social and environmental impact and competitive financial returns.

Last week at Morgan Stanley’s New York City headquarters, Kellogg’s Nicole Chavas, Nathen Holub, Laura Kimes and April Mendez presented their winning idea for the Fresh Coast Forest Fund, which would lease 25,000 acres of contaminated municipal land to plant poplar tree farms on contaminated urban and industrial sites. Poplars naturally clean and restore soil by absorbing toxins, and could be harvested for use as biomass or wood product.

As a collaboration among the Kellogg School of Management, INSEAD, and the Morgan Stanley Institute for Sustainable Investing, the competition seeks to identify the next generation of sustainable investing practitioners, connect emerging leaders with industry professionals, and foster even greater emphasis on sustainability at graduate schools around the world.

At last week’s event, ten finalist teams proposed investment vehicles addressing issues including agriculture, solar energy and sanitation. In February, more than 220 students from 39 schools in 10 different countries submitted prospectuses for the competition.

A team from the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business won second place for their proposal, myCatch, a lending vehicle that would provide loans to organizations on behalf of small-scale sustainable fisheries.

“It is exciting to see today’s students—tomorrow’s financial professionals—pushing the frontiers of financial innovation to achieve positive social or environmental impact,” says Jamie Jones, Director of Social Entrepreneurship at the Kellogg School of Management. “The young leaders who participated in the competition will be a driving force for the conversation about sustainable investing at their academic institutions.”

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How to Maximize Your MBA Experience

The MBA Student Voice blog of UCLA Anderson School of Management recently posted some great advice from second-year student Nathan Adelman on how to make the most of your MBA experience, and it rings true …

school-ucla-anderson

The MBA Student Voice blog of UCLA Anderson School of Management recently posted some great advice from second-year student Nathan Adelman on how to make the most of your MBA experience, and it rings true no matter where you eventually end up.

Adelman lists key lessons he’s learned while at Anderson, and we’ve summarized four of them below. For more of his thoughts on each subject, click over to the original post linked above.

Lesson 1: The difference between a good MBA experience and a great one is about $10,000.

No one is denying that business school is an expensive endeavor, but Adelman says ponying up an extra $10K will cover the international trips, clubs, and social events that will take your entire MBA experience to the next level.

“These experiences will impart to you a global perspective, lifelong friends, and a strong business network that will benefit you for the next 40 years of your career,” Adelman says.

Lesson 2: Not studying for a test is actually harder than studying for the test.

Getting straight A’s doesn’t open any more doors for your career path than getting B’s, Adelman says, who believes classes are the activity in business school that have had the least influence on landing his dream job.

“Once I was comfortable with that feeling, it enabled me to better manage my time and prioritize my commitments which in turn  allowed me to get the most out of my business school experience, inside and outside of the classroom,” he explains.

Lesson 3: Greater career focus yields more career opportunities.

Recruiting for multiple industries and job functions actually creates fewer opportunities for finding something you truly like, Adelman believes. Be as focused as possible, he urges, and take the time to go for something that really gets you excited.

“All this extra time allows you to focus on specializing in your specific area of interest.  This means you actually have the time to do industry research, network with people in the industry, and get to know the companies intimately – all things that you will actually talk about in your interview!” Adelman advises.

After all, he says, it’s much easier to help the “Restaurant Girl” or the “The Pharma Guy” than it is to help the “Maybe consulting, maybe marketing, maybe tech Guy.”

Lesson 4: Mentors cannot be assigned, they must be found.

While most schools have mentorship programs that pair students with someone experienced in their field of interest, Adelman believes the best mentorship relationships happen organically between people with an authentic connection both professional and personal.

“It is this personal connection that really separates an ‘advisor’ from a ‘mentor’, and also it cannot be faked,” he says. “So don’t be afraid to seek out those people whom you admire and want to emulate – odds are one of them will see something in you as well.”

You may also be interested in:

Maximize Your MBA Experience

Thoughts on the UCLA Anderson Interview

UCLA Anderson School of Management MBA Essay Tips

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NYU Stern MBA Program Appoints New Dean of Students

New York University Stern School of Business announced it has appointed alumnus Conor Grennan as Dean of Students for the MBA program, a position which acts as a liaison between the administration and more than …

NYU Stern dean of students

New York University Stern School of Business announced it has appointed alumnus Conor Grennan as Dean of Students for the MBA program, a position which acts as a liaison between the administration and more than 2,500 full-time and Langone MBA students.

Grennan earned his MBA at NYU Stern in 2010, and served as student body president during the second year of his MBA studies. Before earning his MBA, Conor founded Next Generation Nepal, a non-governmental organization (NGO) that has rescued and reconnected with their families approximately 500 trafficked children in post-war Nepal.

While at Stern, Conor wrote “Little Princes: One Man’s Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal,” a New York Times best-selling book that chronicles his motivations for and experiences with his NGO.

“Conor instantly grasps what we mean when we say we’re in the business of inspiring future leaders to create value in the world because he has transformed our promise into real outcomes in the real world,” says Peter Henry, dean of NYU Stern.

“Conor is a bridge builder who successfully discovers unforeseen opportunities to make a meaningful difference where business, society, culture and people intersect,” Henry adds. “We are delighted to have one of our own return to Stern in this important administrative capacity to mentor and guide future generations of Stern students.”

In 2014, Conor was named a recipient of the Unsung Heroes of Compassion, which was awarded to him by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Huffington Post named Conor one of its “Game Changers of the Year” in 2011. His book, “Little Princes,” is now required reading in numerous colleges and universities around the country. Conor will continue to serve as a member of Next Generation Nepal’s Board of Directors.

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Unusually High Admissions Rate at UNC Kenan-Flagler

While we often hear about the extremely low acceptance rates at MBA programs at Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business—11% and 7%, respectively—we don’t often discuss the cases on the other side …

While we often hear about the extremely low acceptance rates at MBA programs at Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business—11% and 7%, respectively—we don’t often discuss the cases on the other side of the dial, particularly among well-ranked schools.

The University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School finds itself in just that position, with a high MBA admissions rate of 44%, according to a recent story in the Daily Tar Heel.

Senior MBA admissions director Lisa Beisser acknowledges that the percentage is higher than Kenan-Flagler would like, particularly from a perception point of view, and that a realistic admissions rate to aim for would be 30-35%. “That would be much more in line with our peer schools,” she says.

Kenan-Flagler’s new dean Doug Shackelford, who began his term on February 1st of this year, doesn’t seem worried about lowering the admissions rate to improve the school’s ranking by key media outlets.

“Any school in the world who isn’t ranked No. 1 would like to be No. 1,” he says in the Daily Tar Heel, noting that the rankings are based on many, often subjective, factors.

The school introduced a new branding campaign in 2013 which emphasizes the ampersand symbol, distinguishing Kenan-Flagler as a place where students master both “the science & heart of business.”

The change in tone may have led to the dramatic 30% increase in application volume this year. Beisser says that most schools would consider a 4-6% increase a success, so “That’s huge actually in the business school world.”

Whatever the cause, right now Dean Shackelford is focused only on attracting the best students and providing the best management education possible.

“We don’t sit here and reverse engineer the rankings,” he tells the Daily Tar Heel. “If we get that ranking, wonderful; if not, we’ll live with it.”

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Tuck Dean Danos to Step Down After 19 Years

Tuck School of Business Dean Paul Danos has announced his plans to step down when his current term ends in 2015. At 19 years, his tenure is the longest in Tuck’s history and one of …

Tuck School of Business Dean Paul Danos has announced his plans to step down when his current term ends in 2015. At 19 years, his tenure is the longest in Tuck’s history and one of the longest in management education. By the end of his fifth term, nearly half of Tuck’s 10,000-plus living alumni will have graduated under his deanship.

Danos joined Tuck in 1995 and has guided the school through one of the most transformative periods in its history. He led a dramatic expansion of Tuck’s world-class faculty; oversaw the launch of nine centers and initiatives; and introduced a broad array of MBA curriculum innovations that enabled the school to keep pace with the ever-changing landscape of global business.

“I realize that none of our achievements would have been possible without the contributions of our entire community—our skilled and caring faculty, our outstanding students, our committed staff, and our loyal and dedicated alumni,” Danos said in a letter to the Tuck community announcing  that he would not seek reappointment for a sixth term.

“Your support and encouragement over the last two decades has been vital to Tuck’s continued success and has meant the world to me. Tuck is a great school with a virtuous circle of caring people who will ensure that its future will be as bright as its past,” he added.

Under Danos, Tuck has consistently been cited for the excellence of its MBA program, and is known for its world-leading alumni giving rate, which is nearly three times the average participation rate of other business schools.

Dartmouth President Phil Hanlon also expressed the school’s gratitude to Dean Danos, saying his “commitment to the quality of the MBA program and to preparing students for a lifetime of responsible leadership has earned Tuck a unique place among the world’s top graduate schools of business. “

At Tuck, Danos also presided over an increase in both the size and quality of the student body, as classes became more international, diverse, and balanced between genders. The size of the faculty also grew during this period. Under his leadership, the number of full-time faculty at Tuck rose from 36 to 51, as did their levels recognition and accomplishment.

Board of Overseers Chair Christopher J. Williams said he anticipates significant global interest in this deanship, since “The opportunity to lead one of the world’s truly great business schools is a rare one.”

President Hanlon will be working with incoming Provost Carolyn Dever to form a search committee and will be seeking input from faculty, senior administrators, students, and alumni as they conduct a thoughtful search for the next dean. Williams said Tuck will likely announce a new dean in early 2015.

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Columbia Hosts Odyssey Management Competition

Columbia Business School will host the sixth annual ODYSSEY Global MBA Competition and Symposium, coming up on March 28 and March 29, 2014.  Held each spring, this student-organized event features a three-part business management competition …

Columbia Business School will host the sixth annual ODYSSEY Global MBA Competition and Symposium, coming up on March 28 and March 29, 2014.  Held each spring, this student-organized event features a three-part business management competition between teams from a select group of the world’s top business schools who have gathered to learn, network, and compete.

In addition to the competition, the event includes a symposium featuring industry leaders addressing this year’s theme—Disrupt or Be Disrupted—which focuses on the need for companies to be agile in the face of disruptive forces and to manage innovation in order to stay ahead of challenges confronted.

Each team will compete in three categories: an entrepreneurial pitch, a case study presentation, and negotiation skills.  Leading industry practitioners judge the event, awarding points based on strength of concept and solutions, negotiation skills, and presentations.

Who:

  • Frank Eliason, Director, Global Social Media, Citi
  • Neal Goldman ’96, Founder and CEO, Relationship Science; and Co-Founder and former CEO, Capital IQ
  • Bruce Greenwald, Robert Heilbrunn Professor of Finance and Asset Management, Columbia Business School
  • Craig Hatkoff ’78, Founder, Victor Capital Group; Co-founder, Tribeca Film Festival and the Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Awards
  • David Kidder, Co-Founder and CEO, Bionic; Co-founder and former CEO, Clickable; and author on entrepreneurship

Participating schools include Chicago Booth School of Business, China Europe International Business School, Cambridge Judge Business School, HKUST Business School, INSEAD, London Business School, NYU Stern School of Business, University of Virginia Darden School of Business, and Yale School of Management.

For more information on Odyssey, the competition, and symposium agenda, visit: http://www.mbaodyssey.com.

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