Tag Archives: Columbia Business School

Columbia Business School Fall 2017 Deadlines, Essay Questions

Columbia Business School has announced the MBA application deadlines and essay questions for the 2016-2017 admissions cycle. They are as follows: January 2017 Entry Final Deadline: October 5, 2016 August 2017 Entry Early Decision: October …

Columbia deadlines and essays

Columbia Business School has announced the MBA application deadlines and essay questions for the 2016-2017 admissions cycle. They are as follows:

January 2017 Entry

Final Deadline: October 5, 2016

August 2017 Entry

Early Decision: October 5, 2016

Merit Fellowship Consideration: January 4, 2017

Regular Decision: April 12, 2017

Essay Questions

Goal: What is your immediate post-MBA professional goal? (50 characters)

Essay #1: Through your resume and recommendations, we have a clear sense of your professional path to date. What are your career goals going forward, and how will the Columbia MBA help you achieve them? (100-750 words)

Essay #2: Columbia Business School’s students participate in industry focused New York immersion seminars; in project based Master Classes; and in school year internships. Most importantly, they are taught by a combination of distinguished research faculty and accomplished practitioners. How will you take advantage of being “at the very center of business”? (100-500 Words)

Essay #3: CBS Matters, a key element of the School’s culture, allows the people in your Cluster to learn more about you on a personal level. What will your Clustermates be pleasantly surprised to learn about you? (100-250 Words)

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Columbia Business School students may enroll in either August or January. The CBS admissions website notes that the paths are identical in terms of competitiveness of admissions, academic rigor, and student resources, but they differ in terms of timing and the opportunity to complete a summer internship.

The August entry has two review periods — early decision and regular decision. Because CBS uses a rolling admissions process, it is always to your advantage to apply well before the deadline.

All applications are due at 11:59 p.m. EST on the day of the deadline. For more information, visit the Columbia Business School admissions website.

Photo Credit: Paul Warchol

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Columbia Launches First Student-Run Portfolio Fund

Columbia Business School has launched its first student-led value investing portfolio, known as the 5x5x5 Student Value Investment Fund. The fund, named for its innovative structure, gives students the opportunity to connect value-oriented investment theories …

Columbia student investment fund

Columbia Business School has launched its first student-led value investing portfolio, known as the 5x5x5 Student Value Investment Fund. The fund, named for its innovative structure, gives students the opportunity to connect value-oriented investment theories to real-world practice as they apply their classroom learning to the management of this fund.

“Five by five by five arose from my long-held belief that students ought to have an opportunity to derive deep and lasting lessons from student investment funds,” said  Thomas Russo, who has funded the gift and is also an advisory board member for the Heilbrunn Center for Graham & Dodd Investing at Columbia Business School.

The biggest lessons occur over time. The fund is trying to get investors’ horizons stretched out beyond five minutes, five days or even five quarters. I want the 5x5x5 portfolio to succeed and underscore the message that long-term investing is actually a worthy and profitable pursuit, Russo says.

Investment ideas for the portfolio are submitted by students in the School’s Value Investing course taught by Professors Bruce Greenwald and Tano Santos, faculty directors of the Heilbrunn Center for Graham & Dodd Investing. Each year, five students will be selected to participate in the management of the fund based on the strength of their proposed investments.

Companies pitched should be capable of delivering compound returns over a five-year holding period and students must provide no more than five clearly expressed, understandable, and brief reasons for their selection. The top 15 student recommendations will be submitted to the fund’s investment board, which will vote each year on the five new investments to be included in the portfolio.

Five new investments will be added yearly and by the fifth year, the fund will be comprised of a total of 25 investments. At the end of the five-year holding period, each selected investment will be liquidated to provide capital for future 5x5x5 fund participants to invest. The monetary amount will be increased to adjust for inflation, and the remainder of any gains will be used for student scholarships.

Each student participant has been requested to make a five-year commitment to return to Columbia each year to personally interact with the new student managers. “Each new class of student investors will have the benefit of hearing from the original sponsors of earlier portfolio selections why investments have or have not performed according to expectations,” said Meredith Trivedi, administrative director of the Heilbrunn Center.

Russo’s desire to help form and nurture the next generation of value investors prompted the donation. “I wanted to respect Columbia Business School with this gift for the great education that has been offered to so many people I have revered within the value investment community over so many years.”

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What Does Columbia Business School Look for in Applicants?

Just like people, each MBA program has its own unique personality — and each has its own idea of a perfect match. Knowing what a business school is looking for in potential students can help …

applying to columbia business school

Just like people, each MBA program has its own unique personality — and each has its own idea of a perfect match. Knowing what a business school is looking for in potential students can help you frame your skills, experience, and personality around the qualities they most value.

I recently shared my insights with Business Insider on the six characteristics that Columbia Business School looks for in its MBA applicants. CBS is known for its intellectually driven students who come from a wide array of educational, economic, social, cultural, and geographic backgrounds.

While the student body is certainly diverse, students do have a number of qualities in common, including strong leadership skills, a record of achievement, and the ability to work in teams.

Follow the link above and you’ll find out exactly what are the qualities Columbia admissions committee members seek out in potential students to ensure they’re cultivating the learning community that’s unique to their top-rated MBA program.

Image credit: Columbia Business School

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B-School Deans to Discuss Future of Management Ed.

“Focusing on creating flexible, adept leaders is critical for business schools to continue attracting top talent,” says Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School. This underlying sentiment will serve as the foundation for a landmark …

Columbia Centennial Symposium

“Focusing on creating flexible, adept leaders is critical for business schools to continue attracting top talent,” says Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School. This underlying sentiment will serve as the foundation for a landmark discussion between the deans of the nation’s top business schools as they come together to address critical questions about the future of management education.

“My fellow panelists are all esteemed leaders in the field, and I am hopeful we will bring forward innovative approaches to bridging theory and practice in the curriculums, experiences, and ideas we offer students,” Hubbard adds.

The panel, entitled “What’s Next in Management Education,” is one of three to be held during Columbia Business School’s Centennial Symposium on May 2nd.

Jan Hopkins, former anchor and correspondent for CNN and owner of the Jan Hopkins Group, will moderate the conversation, which will feature deans from the business schools of Harvard, Stanford, Wharton and Columbia and address critical issues such as:

  • Will the MBA degree continue to be valued in the future?
  • How can business schools evolve to meet the demands of a changing economy?
  • What are the challenges and opportunities facing today’s MBA programs?

In addition to the panel on management education, the Symposium will feature two other panels. The first will explore the changing face of global business and examine how multinational companies can continue to flourish in a rapidly changing business environment. The second will focus on how business can define and identify value in the twenty-first century.

As one of the premier events of Columbia Business School’s centennial celebration, this Symposium will commemorate the school’s landmark achievements in key areas of business over the past century, while challenging thought leaders in management education to look to the future and examine the major forces that will impact business in the years ahead.

Photo Credit: Paul Warchol

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Columbia Business School Hosts Branding, Technology Conference

Next week, Columbia Business School‘s Center on Global Brand Leadership will host BRITE ’16, an annual conference that focuses on emerging trends in technology, innovation, culture, and branding. The event, taking place March 7-8th, brings …

Brite Conference at Columbia

Next week, Columbia Business School‘s Center on Global Brand Leadership will host BRITE ’16, an annual conference that focuses on emerging trends in technology, innovation, culture, and branding.

The event, taking place March 7-8th, brings together nearly 600 leaders from an array of industries to discuss how technology and innovation are transforming the ways that companies build and sustain great brands. Now in its ninth year, this two-day conference is designed to spark conversations with innovators, marketers, entrepreneurs, and champions of social enterprise.

Featured speakers at this year’s Brite conference include:

  • Linda Boff, Chief Marketing Officer, GE
  • Scott Erickson, Senior Director of HoloLens, Microsoft
  • Lew Frankfort, Chairman Emeritus, Coach, Inc.
  • Pam Kaufman, Chief Marketing Officer, Nickelodeon Group
  • Shelly Lazarus, Chairman Emeritus, Ogilvy & Mather
  • Daniel Lubetzky, Founder & CEO, KIND Snacks
  • Gregg Renfrew, Founder & CEO, Beautycounter
  • Michael Schrage, Author, The Innovator’s Hypothesis

Presentation topics will include Columbia Business School’s Centennial Panel: reflections on the past and future of business and brand building; the danger of separating technology from the consumer; how successful innovators go beyond ‘user experience’ to build brands; how to market the smart home; value constellations: harness your stakeholders and differentiate your brand; and many more.

The conference will also feature panel discussions, case studies, research, demos of emerging technologies, as well as interactive discussions and peer networking opportunities.

A full agenda for the event can be found here: http://www.briteconference.com/BRITE16

Photo Credit: Paul Warchol

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Prepare for Short Answer MBA Application Essays

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com Ten years ago, lengthy MBA essays were a staple of business school applications. Flash forward to today, and admissions departments worldwide have reduced …

MBA essays

Brainstorm before writing to keep business school essays concise.

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com

Ten years ago, lengthy MBA essays were a staple of business school applications. Flash forward to today, and admissions departments worldwide have reduced the word count and number of essays candidates must tackle. Whether the influence is social media, with its condensed communication style, or simply that the admissions committee has grown weary of reading thousand-word essays from thousands of applicants, it seems short and sweet is here to stay.

Many applicants struggle with short-answer essay questions because they feel like they cannot adequately convey everything they want the admissions committee to know in so few words. The challenge of these brief prompts is to give the admissions committee what they ask for while still providing a compelling snapshot of yourself.

I always advise applicants to do two things as they work on their MBA essays: make sure to answer the question asked and spend a lot of time brainstorming up front. You would be amazed at how many applicants start to answer an essay prompt and veer off-subject entirely. With such a limited word count, even answering a “why” question with a “how” response will be a turnoff to the admissions officer reviewing your application.

 The brainstorming phase is the same whether you have a word count of 750 or 200. First, find a theme, or a couple of main points, you want to convey. Consider the essay set for each MBA application as a whole, and make sure your answers do not overlap but rather build upon each other. Then whittle away anything non-essential, and always avoid the passive voice as it eats up valuable space in your allotted word count. Whenever possible, share details that show a glimpse of your personal interests or something amazing that you have done.

The Columbia Business School application, for example, asks this short-answer question: “What is your immediate post-professional MBA goal?” With a maximum of 50 characters, applicants must distill their responses into something that makes a tweet look verbose.

Though a simple question, it requires that you condense your career goals into one clear career vision statement. Rather than submitting a generic phrase like “work in finance,” the aim is specificity. Something like “real estate finance at a private equity firm” tells the admissions committee far more about your interests and goals.

The career goals essay remains ubiquitous at business schools, though the question’s presentation is evolving. At Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, for example, the essay is broken into three parts, each with a 500-character limit, or about 100 words. First, you need to describe what you plan to do immediately after your MBA. Then you’ll explain the long-term vision for your career. Finally, since many career paths are forged through circumstance, determine what is your Plan B.

Think big picture and focus on the overall story trajectory. What would be the most logical – and interesting – progression from your current skill set and MBA education? How will your next step flow from the combination of those experiences? Ideally, your alternative path is not a massive departure, but simply shows the areas you could see yourself exploring if your primary plan doesn’t materialize.

You’ll have to boil your ideas down to a clear statement of what you plan to do, but if at all possible, the information provided in your resume, recommendation letters and other essays will logically support those plans.

It can be a challenge to show off your personality, accomplishments and aspirations in fewer words, but the short answer essays offer MBA applicants a chance to demonstrate top-notch writing skills. One of the most valuable skills in business is the ability to communicate precisely and concisely, so make sure every word counts.

Image credit: Flickr user Daniel Foster  (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

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