Tag Archives: Columbia Business School

CBS Professor Offers 5 Tips to Boost Your Confidence

Multiple times every day, people in homes and offices across the country are faced with a daunting decision: do I speak up and risk being penalized by or embarrassed in front of my friends, family, …

confidenceMultiple times every day, people in homes and offices across the country are faced with a daunting decision: do I speak up and risk being penalized by or embarrassed in front of my friends, family, colleagues, or superiors; or do I remain silent, refrain from influencing a conversation or decision, and go unnoticed?

In a new TED Talk titled “How to Speak up for Yourself,” Columbia Business School professor and negotiations expert Adam Galinsky offers viewers an answer to this time-weathered dilemma. Through vivid and real-world examples, Galinsky offers viewers five steps to follow to increase their power, overcome insecurity, and boost their assertiveness in public settings.

“Each of us has something called a range of acceptable behavior. When we stay within this range we are rewarded; when we step outside of this range we are punished by being dismissed, demeaned, or ostracized,” says Galinsky, the Vikram S. Pandit Professor of Business at Columbia Business School. “To speak up, we need to both understand our range and also learn how and when to expand it. The key thing that determines that range more than anything else: your power.”

Galinsky provides a series of five tools that can be used to help increase power and improve assertiveness.

  1. Advocate for others (aka, the “Mama Bear Effect”). Advocating for others is easier than advocating for oneself. Thus, people can speak up and use behaviors that traditionally fall outside their range of acceptable behavior. Doing so helps people not only begin to understand their own ranges but also know how to expand them.
  2. Perspective-Taking.  Although this may sound easy, Galinsky calls perspective-taking one of the hardest – but most important – tools people have for better understanding and expanding their ranges of acceptable behavior. Research by Galinsky and others show that by better understanding what someone else really wants, that person is more likely to give you what you really want.
  3. Signal flexibility.  The most effective way to signal flexibility is by giving people a choice.  Providing people with a range of options and/or alternatives lowers their defenses and makes them more receptive to your point of view. Galinsky notes that this tool can work in a variety of situations, from selling a product to parenting a child.
  4. Gain allies.  People feel most comfortable when they have social support in an audience.  Galinsky advises that two easy ways a person can build allies are to be an advocate for others (see number one) and to ask people for their advice.
  5. Display expertise and show passion.  Displaying expertise garners confidence from others, which in turn increases one’s power and expands one’s range of acceptable behavior. Audiences grant greater permission for people to speak up when they display passion for a topic.

“Speaking up can be risky, but these tools will help lower your risk,” says Galinsky. “Whether you’re offering advice to a family member or friend, or deciding whether to confront your employer about a pertinent issue at work, these steps will help increase your confidence, elevate your power, and improve your assertiveness by expanding your range of acceptable behavior.”

Image credit: Flickr user Equipe Integrada (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

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Forté Foundation Launches Men as Allies Initiative

Forté Foundation has introduced its new Men As Allies Initiative to help male students benefit from, and get involved in, enhancing gender equity on business school campuses and to take that experience back to the business world. …

women at business school

Forté Foundation has introduced its new Men As Allies Initiative to help male students benefit from, and get involved in, enhancing gender equity on business school campuses and to take that experience back to the business world.

The new initiative leverages insights from male ally programs started on 10 business schools campuses —  including Harvard Business School, the Wharton School, and Columbia Business School — and is part of a growing movement in recent years to enhance gender equity in business and society.

“Over the past few years, we’ve seen a surge of interest from men in getting involved in issues of gender equality on business school campuses,” said Elissa Sangster, Executive Director of the Forté Foundation, a non-profit consortium of leading multinational companies and top business schools working together to launch women into fulfilling, significant careers through access to business education, opportunities, and a community of successful women.

Many men have felt like outsiders and did not know how to get involved.

“Our initiative sheds light on what male MBA students can do to enhance diversity on campus, which will create a positive ripple effect both at school and when they return to the business world,” Sangster added.

Forte Men as AlliesThe initiative, designed to foster the creation of male-led gender equity groups on campus, includes a new “Men as Allies” website, which contains a toolkit for male students at business schools interested in creating their own initiatives on campus to enhance gender equity, but who need more information to move forward. The toolkit includes insight on reasons to start a group and how to do it, what activities and events are successful, and how to adopt gender-supportive behaviors and work effectively with the Women in Business club on campus.

The website also features insights and podcasts of recent MBA graduates who played a leadership role in the male ally group at pioneering business schools that have walked this road and can share best practices and stumbling blocks. The podcasts feature male allies discussing why they wanted to get involved, what they’ve learned, and what they took back to the workforce. In addition, the site contains valuable research that provides ample evidence of the positive impact of gender diversity in business.

“We may have reached a tipping point as more women are pursuing an MBA and more men are interested in supporting gender equity,” Sangster explained. “While we are making great progress, and getting closer to 40 percent women’s enrollment at our member business schools, initiatives like this one that foster inclusiveness, will help us get to gender parity faster.”

The Forté Foundation initiative launched with help from its business school members and diversity experts, and thanks to generous financial support from Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business, Cornell University’s Johnson School of Management, and Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business.

The initiative leverages the momentum and insights of business schools that have created programs to engage men as champions of gender equity, known as “Manbassadors” programs at some schools. These 10 business schools include:

  • London Business School – ManBassadors, started in 2016
  • Columbia Business School – Manbassadors program, started in 2015
  • NYU Stern School of Business – Male Allies, started in 2015
  • UCLA Anderson School of Management – Manbassadors, started in 2014
  • Michigan Ross School of Business – MBW Allies, started in 2014
  • The Wharton School – 22’s, started in 2014
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business – WiMEN, started in 2014
  • Duke Fuqua School of Business – Male Ambassador Program, started in 2013
  • Harvard Business School – Manbassadors program, started in 2013
  • Kellogg School of Management – Male Allies, started in 2013

“There are multiple benefits to men who join the movement to create greater gender equity,” said Sangster. “Understanding gender equity positions men ahead of the curve in school and in business. This increased awareness gives them an edge in providing support to female colleagues, and retaining them in the workplace. It also leads to greater organizational health, financial success, and life satisfaction for both men and women.”

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Columbia Business School Announces Changes to Curriculum

During Columbia Business School’s Start-Ups Week held earlier this month, the Eugene Lang Center for Entrepreneurship kicked off the event by announcing they are reorganizing its entrepreneurship curriculum to help students better choose their areas of …

During Columbia Business School’s Start-Ups Week held earlier this month, the Eugene Lang Center for Entrepreneurship kicked off the event by announcing they are reorganizing its entrepreneurship curriculum to help students better choose their areas of interest and plan their future career paths.
student entrrepreneursFor the uninitiated, Start-Ups Week is a four-day celebration of entrepreneurship that allows CBS students to network and build relationships with New York City’s fastest growing companies. The new curriculum changes focus on four categories:  where students are encouraged to think, start, scale, and invest and focus on different aspects of entrepreneurship.

CBS’s New Entrepreneurship Curriculum 

Roadmaps for the curriculum in entrepreneurship at Columbia Business School have recently been reorganized to enable students to quickly and easily understand what’s being offered and choose their areas of interest.  They are divided into the following categories:

  • THINK – this a curriculum  track for any student who would like to adopt an entrepreneurial way of thinking, problem solving and business growth and recognizes the value and importance of entrepreneurial thinking in today’s economy.
  • START – a curriculum track for students planning to start their own business during or after business school and these students are likely to be founders, CEO’s or hold some type of leadership role in that organization.
  • SCALE – a curriculum track for students interested in taking an existing business to the next stage, either growing their own business or a business founded by someone else or perhaps a family business that they will eventually control.
  • INVEST – a curriculum track for students looking to understand what is involved in investing in entrepreneurial companies and what it takes to become an angel investor.

 Students interested in entrepreneurship can also take advantage of the following programs at Columbia:

  • Lang Scholars – Structured as a semester-long independent study, in both the spring and fall, the Lang Scholars program pairs chosen students with teams selected to one of NYC’s top accelerator programs including Techstars, ERA and Dreamit. This semester 17 Columbia Business School students are paired with the 17 teams in the  Dreamit, accelerator.  Students benefit by experiencing entrepreneurship in a live setting, gaining exposure to the network and resources Dreamit brings while Dreamit companies benefit by gaining access to the world-class business knowledge, experience and talent of Columbia Business School MBA’s.
  • Fall Venture Fair – The Annual Fall Venture Fair provides students with the opportunity to practice their pitch and receive critical feedback from successful entrepreneurs and other knowledgeable practitioners from the Columbia Business School entrepreneurial community.

“We want students to understand the realities of entrepreneurship as early in their business school life cycle as possible so they can make the most informed choice about which career path to pursue,” says Vince Ponzo, Executive Director of the Lang Center. “We have created a unique, goal-oriented framework for the curriculum and programs designed to meet the long-term career objectives of our students.”

You may also be interested in:

What Does Columbia Business School Look for In Applicants?

Columbia Business School Fall 2017 MBA Essay Tips

Columbia Launches First Student-Run Investment Fund

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Tuesday Tips: Columbia Business School Fall 2017 MBA Application Essay Tips

Columbia Business School is highly concerned about fit and your knowledge of the program. New York City is another aspect of the school that pervades its culture and defines some of the unique opportunities of …

columbia business school MBA essay tips

Columbia Business School is highly concerned about fit and your knowledge of the program. New York City is another aspect of the school that pervades its culture and defines some of the unique opportunities of the program.

Thorough school research is crucial to your preparation for this application. Before you get started with this set of essays it will be helpful to brainstorm your career objectives, strengths and weaknesses, and to review the personal elements you will want to discuss.

Columbia offers several flexible options for admission, from full time MBA programs starting in the Fall, to a January entry session and an excellent executive MBA program. Columbia also offers an early decision option for candidates that are committed to attend the school.

Stumped by the Columbia essays? Contact Stacy Blackman Consulting to learn how we can help.

Goal: What is your immediate post-MBA professional goal? (50 characters)

This is a simple question, but may require you to condense your career goals into one clear career vision statement. Columbia presents several examples on their website, all of which have some unique aspect.

Rather than a generic statement like: “Work in finance” the goal is to infuse some specificity. Something like: “Work in real estate finance within a private equity firm” tells the admissions committee far more about your interests and goals.

Note that the limited character count is intended to get you to the point quickly and that all of the examples Columbia has provided are concise and lack any elaboration.

Essay #1: Through your resume and recommendations, we have a clear sense of your professional path to date. What are your career goals going forward, and how will the Columbia MBA help you achieve them? (100-750 words)

Remember that this essay has two purposes: demonstrate that you know why you are interested in Columbia, and showcase why you are an excellent fit for the program. Both goals should be kept in mind as you answer the question.

This question is entirely future focused and specifically asks you to get away from a recitation of your resume. Spend the majority of the space describing your career goals and what you envision you will learn and experience at Columbia to help you achieve your goals.

As you talk about your future you may need to refer to your past career and personal experiences. As you consider what to say make sure you are citing only relevant examples from your career. Think about the experiences you can describe that were truly pivotal and can support your future goals.

For example, perhaps you want to be a general manager of a company or division, and right now you have been working primarily in marketing. You might spend your time at Columbia learning about finance and strategy, being part of consulting projects and interning at a start up to round out your experience and start on your general management path.

Make sure your goals are both achievable and aspirational and that you have specifics about Columbia to support your assertion that it is the right place for you.

Essay #2: Columbia Business School’s students participate in industry focused New York immersion seminars; in project based Master Classes; and in school year internships. Most importantly, they are taught by a combination of distinguished research faculty and accomplished practitioners. How will you take advantage of being “at the very center of business”? (100-500 Words)

Columbia is a school that prides itself in the unique opportunities available in New York City (“the very center of business”) As you address this question make sure your answer is tailored to your individual goals for learning and career.

You should consider the industry you plan to enter, and either the important adjunct professors from that industry at Columbia or the access to major companies from that industry in New York City.

Consider your personal interests and how you might pursue them in the diversity of such an international city, and also the ways that Columbia’s alumni network can provide opportunities within the metropolitan area.

A mix of personal and professional interests may be covered in this topic, and you may want to emphasize either one of those angles depending on the answers you present to the other core questions.

Essay #3: CBS Matters, a key element of the School’s culture, allows the people in your Cluster to learn more about you on a personal level. What will your Clustermates be pleasantly surprised to learn about you? (100-250 Words)

If you watch the linked video, you’ll see that CBS Matters is a part of the Columbia cluster experience that centers around a personal presentation. This essay is entirely about your life story and how you will be perceived by your peers at Columbia.

If you did not cover anything personal in the prior two essays this is your opportunity to stand out from the pack of other applicants.

This essay is somewhat about what matters most to you, and what you would share if asked who you really are. Dig deep into your passions and background and find the aspects that resonate emotionally with you and seem to convey a truth about who you really are.

If you are stumped by this essay prompt you may want to ask friends, family members or colleagues what they view as interesting and unique about you.

Once you have ideas about how to approach this question make sure that you are describing something about yourself that will be interesting both to your peers and to the admissions committee.

Something that is a passion point for you and that demonstrates a bit more about your background and motivations will likely be interesting both your clustermates and the admissions committee.

Image credit: Columbia Business School

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Columbia Business School Fall 2017 Deadlines, Essay Questions

Columbia Business School has announced the MBA application deadlines and essay questions for the 2016-2017 admissions cycle. They are as follows: January 2017 Entry Final Deadline: October 5, 2016 August 2017 Entry Early Decision: October …

Columbia deadlines and essays

Columbia Business School has announced the MBA application deadlines and essay questions for the 2016-2017 admissions cycle. They are as follows:

January 2017 Entry

Final Deadline: October 5, 2016

August 2017 Entry

Early Decision: October 5, 2016

Merit Fellowship Consideration: January 4, 2017

Regular Decision: April 12, 2017

Essay Questions

Goal: What is your immediate post-MBA professional goal? (50 characters)

Essay #1: Through your resume and recommendations, we have a clear sense of your professional path to date. What are your career goals going forward, and how will the Columbia MBA help you achieve them? (100-750 words)

Essay #2: Columbia Business School’s students participate in industry focused New York immersion seminars; in project based Master Classes; and in school year internships. Most importantly, they are taught by a combination of distinguished research faculty and accomplished practitioners. How will you take advantage of being “at the very center of business”? (100-500 Words)

Essay #3: CBS Matters, a key element of the School’s culture, allows the people in your Cluster to learn more about you on a personal level. What will your Clustermates be pleasantly surprised to learn about you? (100-250 Words)

***

Columbia Business School students may enroll in either August or January. The CBS admissions website notes that the paths are identical in terms of competitiveness of admissions, academic rigor, and student resources, but they differ in terms of timing and the opportunity to complete a summer internship.

The August entry has two review periods — early decision and regular decision. Because CBS uses a rolling admissions process, it is always to your advantage to apply well before the deadline.

All applications are due at 11:59 p.m. EST on the day of the deadline. For more information, visit the Columbia Business School admissions website.

Photo Credit: Paul Warchol

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Columbia Launches First Student-Run Portfolio Fund

Columbia Business School has launched its first student-led value investing portfolio, known as the 5x5x5 Student Value Investment Fund. The fund, named for its innovative structure, gives students the opportunity to connect value-oriented investment theories …

Columbia student investment fund

Columbia Business School has launched its first student-led value investing portfolio, known as the 5x5x5 Student Value Investment Fund. The fund, named for its innovative structure, gives students the opportunity to connect value-oriented investment theories to real-world practice as they apply their classroom learning to the management of this fund.

“Five by five by five arose from my long-held belief that students ought to have an opportunity to derive deep and lasting lessons from student investment funds,” said  Thomas Russo, who has funded the gift and is also an advisory board member for the Heilbrunn Center for Graham & Dodd Investing at Columbia Business School.

The biggest lessons occur over time. The fund is trying to get investors’ horizons stretched out beyond five minutes, five days or even five quarters. I want the 5x5x5 portfolio to succeed and underscore the message that long-term investing is actually a worthy and profitable pursuit, Russo says.

Investment ideas for the portfolio are submitted by students in the School’s Value Investing course taught by Professors Bruce Greenwald and Tano Santos, faculty directors of the Heilbrunn Center for Graham & Dodd Investing. Each year, five students will be selected to participate in the management of the fund based on the strength of their proposed investments.

Companies pitched should be capable of delivering compound returns over a five-year holding period and students must provide no more than five clearly expressed, understandable, and brief reasons for their selection. The top 15 student recommendations will be submitted to the fund’s investment board, which will vote each year on the five new investments to be included in the portfolio.

Five new investments will be added yearly and by the fifth year, the fund will be comprised of a total of 25 investments. At the end of the five-year holding period, each selected investment will be liquidated to provide capital for future 5x5x5 fund participants to invest. The monetary amount will be increased to adjust for inflation, and the remainder of any gains will be used for student scholarships.

Each student participant has been requested to make a five-year commitment to return to Columbia each year to personally interact with the new student managers. “Each new class of student investors will have the benefit of hearing from the original sponsors of earlier portfolio selections why investments have or have not performed according to expectations,” said Meredith Trivedi, administrative director of the Heilbrunn Center.

Russo’s desire to help form and nurture the next generation of value investors prompted the donation. “I wanted to respect Columbia Business School with this gift for the great education that has been offered to so many people I have revered within the value investment community over so many years.”

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