Tag Archives: Dartmouth Tuck

Tuesday Tips: Tuck at Dartmouth MBA Essay Tips

The Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important …

The Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important to consistently show how you will fit into the school values of leadership, teamwork and collaboration and bring your own unique qualities and experiences to the community.

Before you begin the essays think about the areas you want to communicate to the Tuck Business School admissions committee. As you consider each topic be sure to provide specific examples to illustrate your unique qualities. Real life experiences are your best evidence of leadership qualities, teamwork skills and management potential.

Stacy Blackman Consulting has worked with successful Tuck applicants for over a decade, contact us to learn more about the customized assistance we can provide for your application.

Essay 1
Why is an MBA a critical next step toward your short- and long-term career goals? Why is Tuck the best MBA fit for you and your goals and why are you the best fit for Tuck?

This standard career goals question requires you to clearly outline your short- and long-term career goals. Your short-term goals are the aspirations you have for your job immediately after graduation, while your long-term goals may be 10 or 20 years after you complete your MBA. In this relatively short essay you will need to explain what you have been pursuing in your career thus far, and why you need an MBA at this point in your life, along with your career goals.

“Why Tuck Business School” is an important aspect to this essay, and your opportunity to demonstrate fit. Make sure you have researched the school’s programs and determined your education will suit your plans. By reaching out to current students and alumni you will gain crucial insights that will provide a personal perspective on the culture of the school.

Essay 2
Tell us about your most meaningful leadership experience and what role you played. What did you learn about your own individual strengths and weaknesses through this experience?

As you consider topics for this essay consider the situations that may have revealed your own strengths and weaknesses with clarity. Think back to Tuck Business School’s criteria, and consider using this essay to either demonstrate your interpersonal leadership skills or to show something from your background or experience that is unique. Think about the leadership opportunities that led to a deeper understanding of yourself and others, and may have resulted in definition of your strengths or an improvement in your weaknesses. The example you choose can be from work or community involvement, as “great leadership can be accomplished in the pursuit or business and societal goals.”

One aspect to consider as you draft this essay is that the Tuck School of Business definition of leadership is inherently collaborative. Team based experiences may be preferable, and as you describe your leadership experience, make sure you explain how you were able to inspire and enable others to accomplish as well.

Essay 3
Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

This is your opportunity to discuss any perceived weaknesses in your application such as low GPA or gaps in your work experience. When approaching a question of this nature, focus on explanations rather than excuses and explain what you have done since the event you are explaining to demonstrate your academic ability or management potential.

You could potentially use this space to add something new that was not covered in the previous essays or in the application, resume or recommendations, however use your judgment about the topics as Tuck asks that you only complete this question if you “feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.”

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Tuck School of Business 2013-2014 Deadlines

Tuck School of Business has posted the application deadlines for the upcoming admissions season. The deadlines are as follows:   Early Action Round Deadline: October 9, 2013 Notification: December 18, 2013   November Round Deadline: …

Tuck School of Business has posted the application deadlines for the upcoming admissions season. The deadlines are as follows:

 

Early Action Round

Deadline: October 9, 2013

Notification: December 18, 2013

 

November Round

Deadline: November 6, 2013

Notification: February 7, 2014

 

January Round

Deadline: January 3, 2014

Notification: March 14, 2014

 

April Round

Deadline: April 2, 2014

Notification: May 16, 2014

 

First Consortium Round

Deadline: October 15, 2013

Notification: February 7, 2014

 

Second Consortium Round

Deadline: January 15, 2014

Notification: March 14, 2014

***

For more information, visit Tuck’s admissions website.

 

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Applicant-Initiated Interviews at Tuck School of Business

Did you know that Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business offers applicants the chance to initiate an interview with admissions? Unlike it’s peer schools, which typically maintain an invitation-only policy, Tuck’s Open Interview Policy means that …

Tuck School of BusinessDid you know that Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business offers applicants the chance to initiate an interview with admissions? Unlike it’s peer schools, which typically maintain an invitation-only policy, Tuck’s Open Interview Policy means that any applicant who wants to visit the school and interview with the admissions committee may do so.

In a video message posted to the Tuck School website, Director of Admissions Dawna Clarke explains that interviews are so helpful for the admissions committee in order to assess those valuable interpersonal skills, team skills, leadership skills, and of course, communication skills.

Applicants want the opportunity to be heard, and Tuck is proud to be able to offer that opportunity to any applicant who requests it, Clarke says, noting that “An interview really helps us get a sense of your personality and softer skills that are a little harder to assess on the basis of a written application.”

The interviews are with either second-year students or a member of the admissions committee, and applicants have the opportunity to sit in on a class, have lunch with a second-year student, tour the facilities, and participate in an information session with an AdCom member during their visit.

For applicants unable to visit Tuck and take advantage of the open interview option, Clarke says that they would need to briefly explain the reason on their application and wait for the admissions committee invitation to interview, which is issued after an initial review of a candidate’s application.

According to Tuck, on-campus interviews are conducted by admissions committee members and selected second-year students. Off-campus interviews are conducted by admissions committee members, admissions associates, or alumni interviewers. All interviews are evaluated equally, regardless of interviewer, location, or how initiated.

Applicants should note that with the exception of the January round, interviews must be completed by the published deadline for the round in which you are applying. Because the January round deadline is 1/3/13, the applicant-initiated interview deadline is January 31st.

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Spotlight On: Tuck Entrepreneurship Initiative

Last fall, Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business launched the Entrepreneurship Initiative (EI) to support and enhance the resources available to students interested in entrepreneurial ventures. One year later, the response has been overwhelmingly positive. …

Tuck School of Business

Last fall, Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business launched the Entrepreneurship Initiative (EI) to support and enhance the resources available to students interested in entrepreneurial ventures. One year later, the response has been overwhelmingly positive.

Of the MBA students who graduated from Tuck in 2012, about half the class had listed entrepreneurship as one of their main interests upon enrollment, the school reveals, noting that about 55 percent acted on this interest before graduation by enrolling in entrepreneurship courses or undertaking course projects where they worked on an entrepreneurial idea.

About 10 percent of the class chose to take a step further by devoting significant time outside of the classroom to improving and developing their ideas through structured extracurricular activities organized by the new initiative, such as the Summer Venture program.

The initiative has expanded several programs at Tuck, including the Barris Incubator Program, which supports and facilitates the launch and development of Tuck- and Dartmouth-related ventures. The EI also established the Entrepreneur in Residence program.

The program taps into the wealth of Tuck and Dartmouth entrepreneurs by connecting them with current students. Visiting entrepreneurs give a presentation to students, hold office hours and one-on-one meetings, and are available for student consultation beyond their visit to campus, making it easier for students and visitors to connect.

“By taking advantage of the entrepreneurial resources at Tuck, you get the best of both worlds,” says Joaquin Villarreal (Tuck MBA ’08), manager of the initiative.

“You get a top-notch business education, which you can apply towards more traditional career choices for MBAs,” he adds. “You can also explore the process behind starting a new venture and develop a set of tools to address the distinctive challenges that face both start-ups and established businesses.”

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Why B-Schools Need to Teach PR

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News–Strictly Business blog. According to a new study, many American business leaders regard recent M.B.A. grads as ill-prepared to manage corporate crises due to a lack of strategic …

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News–Strictly Business blog.

According to a new study, many American business leaders regard recent M.B.A. grads as ill-prepared to manage corporate crises due to a lack of strategic communication and reputation management skills. To combat this, the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) has launched an M.B.A. Initiative aimed at incorporating more public relations coursework into b-school curricula to better prepare future C-suite executives for handling the evolving reputational challenges they will face.

Commissioned by PRSA and funded by the public relations firm MWW Group, the Kelton Research study found that 93 percent of business leaders believe public relations is just as important to their companies as other forms of communication, including advertising and marketing.

“The need for these skills has never been greater,” notes MWW Group President and CEO Michael Kempner on his personal blog. “With social media driving the conversation, what used to be considered a small setback can now turn into a major PR disaster in a matter of minutes.”

While 59 percent of business leaders say their companies have hired recent M.B.A. grads within the last three years, only four in 10 find the skill sets of these grads to be extremely strong in the areas of building and protecting the company’s reputation (41 percent) and credibility (40 percent). Nearly all executives (98 percent) believe that business schools should incorporate instruction on corporate communications and reputation management strategy into M.B.A. curricula.

“If you ask business executives how important organizational and brand reputation are to their jobs, they’re likely to answer ‘extremely,'” says Anthony D’Angelo, co-chair of PRSA’s M.B.A. Initiative along with Ray Crockett, retired Coca-Cola communications director. “The difficulty is, if you ask them how much formal education””however basic””they’ve had in these disciplines, the answer usually falls between very little and a blank stare.”

A Businessweek article on the subject earlier in 2011 identifies the main reason elite M.B.A. programs aren’t doing a stellar job of preparing students for future responsibilities in reputation management. A paltry 16 percent of top-ranked schools “offer a single course in crisis and conflict management, strategic communications, public relations, or whatever label one chooses to describe management of a precious organizational asset: reputation,” according to the article.

To help address this lack of training, PRSA has created a turn-key program based on course curricula developed over three decades by Paul Argenti, professor of corporate communications at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business. The class will include lessons on communication strategy, media relations, international corporate responsibility, reputation management, and investor relations.

Developed with the support of the Arthur W. Page Society, the course incorporates flexible full-semester, mini-semester, and seminar formats, thus increasing the likelihood of adoption by the nation’s M.B.A. programs.

Argenti believes that now is the perfect time for M.B.A. programs to place a greater emphasis on strategic communication and reputation management studies.

“It’s exciting to think of Tuck’s enduring and successful approach to corporate communication getting recognition and acceptance in the wider business school community,” Argenti says. “We look forward to working with PRSA and its partners to help spread the message about the imperative for today’s business leaders to understand reputation and corporate communication strategy and methodology.”

PRSA says it’s in the process of identifying four charter schools, in addition to the Tuck School of Business, to take part in a pilot program, through which the schools will formally integrate the public relations course into their M.B.A. programs for their fall 2012 semesters. PRSA set a timeline to launch the initiative with M.B.A. programs nationwide in 2013.

Public relations should be taught right up there with accounting and talent management, says Kempner, who feels PR is as intrinsic to a business strategy as the advertising budget, finances, or inventory. “Business schools have the opportunity and a responsibility to graduate well-rounded leaders, who have all the tools in their toolbox, including a core set of public relations skills.”

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Tuesday Tips – Dartmouth Tuck MBA Essay Tips

The Dartmouth Tuck School of Business has a small student body and a rural location, combined with a world class faculty and academic focus. As expressed on the website, “Tuck is well known for fostering …

The Dartmouth Tuck School of Business has a small student body and a rural location, combined with a world class faculty and academic focus. As expressed on the website, “Tuck is well known for fostering a close-knit community. This is not merely a feel-good exercise but a conscious strategy to build and refine the values of collaboration, support, respect, and stewardship.” As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important to consistently show how you will fit into these values of teamwork and collaboration and bring your own unique perspective to the unique community.

If you are targeting the Round One deadline on October 12th, you may be thinking about how to approach this set of Tuck School of Business essay questions.

Setting strategy is your best first step. Clearly assess which of Tuck’s desired traits are ones that you can demonstrate through your own experience. What are the areas you want to communicate to the Tuck Business School admissions committee? Which essays work best for a work example or a community service example? Be sure to provide specific examples for each essay. Real life experiences are your best evidence of leadership qualities, teamwork skills and management potential.

While Tuck Business School does not specify a word limit, the 500-word guidance should be adhered to. Generally 10% plus or minus the word limit suggestion is reasonable when there is no formal limit.

1. Why is an MBA a critical next step toward your short- and long-term career goals? Why is Tuck the best MBA program for you? (If you are applying for a joint or dual degree, please explain how the additional degree will contribute to those goals.)
This standard career goals question requires you to clearly outline your short- and long-term career goals. Your short term goals are the aspirations you have for your job immediately after graduation, while your long-term goals may be 10 or 20 years after you complete your MBA. In this relatively short essay you will need to explain what you have been pursuing in your career thus far, and why you need an MBA at this point in your life, along with your career goals.

“Why Tuck Business School” is an important aspect to this essay, and your opportunity to demonstrate fit. Make sure you have researched the school’s programs and determined your education will suit your plans. By reaching out to current students and alumni you will gain crucial insights that will provide a personal perspective on the culture of the school.

2. Discuss your most meaningful leadership experience. What did you learn about your own individual strengths and weaknesses through this experience?
This essay is similar to Kellogg’s leadership essay. As in the Kellogg essay, you will want to define your strengths and weaknesses as a leader. What are you good at, and what do you hope to develop at Tuck Business School? Unlike the Kellogg essay, this version requires that you describe one specific example that illustrates your leadership challenges and strengths. When you contemplate your most meaningful leadership experience, it may not be the most impressive example. Think about the leadership opportunities that led to a deeper understanding of yourself and others, and may have resulted in definition of your strengths or an improvement in your weaknesses.

The example you choose can be from work or community involvement, as “great leadership can be accomplished in the pursuit or business and societal goals.” You will need to adhere to the Tuck School of Business definition of leadership and include a team-based aspect to your example. As you describe your leadership experience, make sure you explain how you were able to inspire and enable others to accomplish.

3. Describe a circumstance in your life in which you faced adversity, failure, or setback. What actions did you take as a result and what did you learn from this experience?
This question is your opportunity to show how you handle challenging situations. Everyone faces adversity, failure or setbacks at work or in personal life, and it is how you decide to react that demonstrates your character. Revealing your emotions and thought process along with your actions in this essay will provide a window into how you process difficult experiences and emerge from them with a new direction. Think back to Tuck Business School’s criteria, and consider using this essay to either demonstrate your interpersonal skills (if your challenge was of the interpersonal variety) or to show something from your background or experience that is unique.

When brainstorming for this essay think first about what you learned from the situation, and then work backwards to describe the circumstances and the initial challenge or hurdle, that will help you see the whole situation from a more optimistic viewpoint. Is there a learning from the experience that impacted your life or carried a thread through your character, goals or accomplishments?

4. Tuck seeks candidates of various backgrounds who can bring new perspectives to our community. How will your unique personal history, values, and/or life experiences contribute to the culture at Tuck?
This question provides you with an opportunity to describe why you are different from other applicants. Do you have a unique background? Unusual work experience? Or have you demonstrated a consistent history of community involvement? The part of your application strategy that is most unique and surprising should be described here.

Once you have determined what is special about your candidacy, you need to tie your personal history, values and/or life experiences to how you will interact with your fellow students at Tuck Business School. The most obvious approach is to outline the clubs and organizations you will contribute to. Beyond formal groups, you may contribute your unique perspective to the classroom, provide networking opportunities in your industry to your classmates, or mentor your fellow students.

5. (Optional) Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.
This is your opportunity to discuss any perceived weaknesses in your application such as low GPA or gaps in your work experience. When approaching a question of this nature, focus on explanations rather than excuses and explain what you have done since the event you are explaining to demonstrate your academic ability, or management potential. If you do not have a weakness to explain, this may be an opportunity to address any additional facet of your application strategy you have not been able to illuminate in previous questions. There is no requirement to complete this question, and it would be wise to use the space for something truly new and important to your application that has not been addressed elsewhere.

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