Tag Archives: Dartmouth Tuck

Advice for Reapplicants from Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business

If you’ve applied to Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business in the past but were not successful in obtaining admission, a recent blog posting by Patricia Harrison, an associate director of admissions at Tuck, has terrific …

If you’ve applied to Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business in the past but were not successful in obtaining admission, a recent blog posting by Patricia Harrison, an associate director of admissions at Tuck, has terrific advice and words of consolation that can guide you no matter where you are reapplying.

While some schools, such as INSEAD, are not especially keen on reapplicants, Harrison says Tuck welcomes b-school hopefuls who try to gain admission again”¦with the caveat that they have got to show they’ve made a sincere effort to improve upon their previous application and strengthened their candidacy.

Improved how? Perhaps by brushing up on your quantitative skills by taking additional classes in financial accounting, statistics and microeconomics; a stronger GMAT score; more leadership experience; and clearly stated career goals that explain how Tuck fits into your grand plan. The goal, says Harrison, is to show how much you’ve accomplished since your application last crossed the admissions desk.

“In terms of work experience, again there is no magic number as to how many years you must have, but if you are only a year or two out of school, you might want to think about waiting a little longer to reapply until you get some more experience under your belt,” she advises. Whether your employment history is brief or lengthy, it is crucial to show the quality of the experience.

Unclear goals and/or reasons for wanting to come to Tuck is something we see from a lot of applicants, says Harrison. That’s why how you explain your short and long-term goals is so important–and short-term means want you want to do post-MBA, not simply getting into b-school, she clarifies, adding that, “While we don’t need to see your life plan down to the most specific detail, having a good sense of where you are heading is important.”

Like all programs, it’s important to connect the dots as to how an MBA is going to help you further your career goals, and why, in this case, Tuck is the place to do so. “Talk about unique programs we offer that are related to your area of interest or how the community will support your plans,” Harrison advises.

For more tips from the admissions committee at Tuck School of Business, including procedural information for those reapplying, follow this link. I’ve also recently written about reapplying to business school on my US News–Strictly Business blog; you can read the article here.

 

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SBC Scoop: A Nonprofit Success Story

Top MBA programs are filled with students who have a traditional business background in fields like management consulting and finance, or with experience in large corporate environments. Applicants who pursued nonprofit or social enterprise work …

Top MBA programs are filled with students who have a traditional business background in fields like management consulting and finance, or with experience in large corporate environments. Applicants who pursued nonprofit or social enterprise work after undergrad are often less likely to return to school for a high priced professional degree like an MBA, though top MBA programs are always interested in the diversity of experience offered by nonprofit applicants. If you are approaching an MBA application with a nonprofit background, Peter’s story might help you think about how to approach your own application strategy.

Peter signed up with Stacy Blackman Consulting seeking advice about how to frame his nonprofit arts management background for HBS, Tuck, Kellogg and NYU applications. His degree was in Art History from a small liberal arts college on the west coast, and most of his classmates had pursued PhDs for a career in academia. Peter had always been interested in combining his creative approach with a team based environment, and didn’t see a future researching and teaching at the University level. Through a family friend he was able to land an entry level position at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the arts education group. Though he enjoyed spending time with art lovers and learning the museum business, he used his free time to explore his desire to lead teams to a common goal. Peter started a small collective with some of his artist friends, who were not established in the art world. The purpose of the collective was to promote the artists’ work as well as outreach programs to NYC public school kids as the city’s budget cuts impacted arts education.

Peter’s background and initiative was impressive. His career was on a strong trajectory within MoMA and his volunteer activities were going well, but Peter wanted to pursue entrepreneurial activity within the arts world more aggressively and decided to pursue an MBA.
Our challenge with Peter’s application, like many non-traditional applicants, was that we needed to highlight how well Peter would fit in with his peers, despite a very different career thus far. While many traditional MBA applicants need to differentiate, Peter needed to demonstrate how well suited he was for a competitive MBA program.

The first hurdle was to overcome Peter’s less quantitative academic background. He had achieved a 3.8 GPA and a 690 GMAT score (after three tries), which we decided was a good academic profile for his demographic and background. We did want to make sure there were no questions about his ability to perform in a quantitative program. Rather than advising another try at the GMAT we suggested he take calculus and statistics. He did so and was able to earn As in both and submit those scores with his application to create a solid academic profile.

The softer aspect of fitting in was personal qualities and goals. Sitting down with Peter and discussing his leadership track record and aspirations, it was clear that Peter was a highly motivated, organized and ambitious person who was a clear fit for a top MBA program. Now we just needed to work on showcasing these traits and his fit with each specific school.
For his career goals essay we outlined Peter’s vision for his volunteer organization: to work with corporate arts programs and grow his collective into a social enterprise that created value for artists (allowing them to live on their work) while also providing arts education for urban children.

A natural network of people who have MBAs or are in MBA programs happens less frequently for applicants from a nonprofit background. We encouraged Peter to use his contacts in traditional business roles, who he had met in his volunteer activities and at MoMA, and to find alumni from each of his target schools to meet with. Peter spent several months working his network, and was able to meet with alumni from his target schools to discuss his goals and fit with the programs. This research was incorporated into his career goals and “why MBA” essays and made a huge difference in his results.

Peter was able to demonstrate leadership effectively by discussing how he formed and led his collective to achieve an impact in NYC schools and for its members, and he used his experience within a large museum to discuss his view of organization dynamics in nonprofits and how he wanted to use an MBA to design his own future organization.

Because of Peter’s drive, ambition, networking and strong story he ultimately gained admission to Tuck.

To read more SBC Case Studies, click HERE.

 

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Posted in Dartmouth Tuck Advice, SBC Scoop: Client Case Studies | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

B-Schools Affected by Budget Deficits, Too

Though the labor protests in Wisconsin have focused our nation’s attention on state budget woes, many other organizations have been adversely affected by budget shortcomings, including top business schools.

Though the labor protests in Wisconsin have focused our nation’s attention on state budget woes, many other organizations have been adversely affected by budget shortcomings, including top business schools.

In the article “Business Schools Get Lean,” BusinessWeek‘s Francesca Di Meglio reported that many b-schools have been forced to reduce spending, due to decreased endowments and state cuts to higher education in the wake of the recent recession. Avoiding layoffs has been a priority for most schools, but could not always be avoided. Here are a few of the cutting-back strategies employed by the b-schools featured in the article:

Tuck School of Business – Reorganized existing tasks, such as centralizing the school’s recycling system, which saved labor hours. Also reduced travel in favor of technologies such as videoconferencing.

Chicago Booth School of Business – While Booth didn’t lay off existing faculty, the school held off on filling openings and has reduced its temporary and contract workers. Like Tuck, Booth has also cut its travel budget and implemented a policy requiring approval from the dean’s office for travel.

Wharton School of Business – One round of layoffs in executive education department. Renegotiated contracts with vendors and cut down on travel and entertainment expenses.

Harvard Business School – Turned off heating and cooling systems during non-business hours. According to Meghan Duggan, assistant director of sustainability and energy management at HBS, this simple action resulted in six-figure savings.

Program cuts aren’t the only concern for potential b-school students. As businesses also struggle with their budgets, many of them are cutting back on tuition assistance programs, another BusinessWeek article reports. In “Tuition Benefits Drying Up,” Erin Zlomek writes, “In 2010, 56 percent of employers offered graduate school assistance, down from 69 percent in 2003, according to annual benefits data collected by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).”

Posted in Chicago Booth Advice, Dartmouth Tuck Advice, General, Harvard Advice, UPenn Wharton Advice | Tagged , , , ,

Tuck Unveils Master of Health Care Delivery Science

Quality healthcare goes beyond the physician-patient relationship; it also requires efficiency that comes from a well-executed management plan. The June issue of Tuck Today profiles Dartmouth College president Dr. Jim Yong Kim, a medical doctor, …

Quality healthcare goes beyond the physician-patient relationship; it also requires efficiency that comes from a well-executed management plan. The June issue of Tuck Today profiles Dartmouth College president Dr. Jim Yong Kim, a medical doctor, anthropologist, and the co-founder of the nongovernmental organization Partners in Health. Kim believes delivering quality health care is one of the greatest challenges facing the next generation of business leaders.

To meet that challenge, Dartmouth’s president plans to harness the college’s vast resources””including Tuck’s management expertise.

The school recently announced the creation of a new master’s program of health care delivery science, geared for mid-career health care executives and offered as a cooperative effort between Tuck School of Business and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice (TDI). The program will likely include distance learning components in combination with the team-based residential learning that forms the bedrock of the Tuck experience.

“This is President Kim’s deep expertise and his deep interest,” says Tuck’s dean Paul Danos. “He’s done this for years at the highest level, and now he wants to take Tuck’s particular expertise, together with the science of health care outcomes available at TDI, to improve management of hospitals and clinics all over the world.”

Danos explains that the new program will leverage Tuck’s management and leadership training with TDI’s pioneering expertise in the science of measuring health care delivery and outcomes. “This is aimed at people who are already managing health care operations, so we don’t expect them to be here full-time the way an MBA student would be,” Danos says. “But we do want to imbue the program with the same teamwork, camaraderie, and cooperation that you get in the Tuck MBA.”

In keeping with Tuck’s strong emphasis on “action-learning projects,” the article explains that participants will work in teams to solve real organizational management issues, using what they learn from both Tuck and TDI faculty. Elements of Tuck’s new leadership curriculum emphasizing peer coaching and self-awareness will likely be integrated into the program as well, says senior associate dean Bob Hansen.

The program may launch as early as next year if all components fall into place. “We want to get the right mix of participants, working together on real projects. We’ll combine Tuck management knowledge and pedagogy, TDI’s research-based knowledge, leadership training, and action learning,” Hansen says. “That’s a powerful program.”

For more details on the Tuck Healthcare Initiative, its new courses, and president Kim’s plans in this area, follow this link to the original article.

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Dartmouth to Offer Streamlined MBA to PhDs

Dartmouth Provost Barry Scherr announced a new program agreement Monday between Dartmouth Graduate Studies and Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, allowing Dartmouth PhDs to obtain an accelerated MBA degree as part of a new dual-degree …

Dartmouth Provost Barry Scherr announced a new program agreement Monday between Dartmouth Graduate Studies and Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, allowing Dartmouth PhDs to obtain an accelerated MBA degree as part of a new dual-degree program.

“The PhD/MBA represents a natural synergy between our selective PhD programs and Tuck’s outstanding MBA program,” says Scherr. “The joint degree aims to produce individuals who are not only thoroughly trained in a scientific discipline but also possess fundamental business and entrepreneurial skills. The recipients of the PhD/MBA will offer a valuable blend of leadership qualities for any organization.”

Dartmouth PhD students will apply to Tuck through the normal admissions process, timed to begin at Tuck right after finishing their PhD. The Dartmouth PhD experience will be counted as post-bachelor’s degree work experience as well as for some elective courses. Coursework is expected to be one term less than for students in the regular MBA program and some courses could even be taken prior to matriculation in the program.

“Individuals with both scientific expertise as well as management training will be valued,” adds Tuck’s dean, Paul Danos. “More and more in business, leaders with multiple skills and deep knowledge in a technical area are highly sought after. Graduates of this program will certainly be poised to start high tech companies and make major contributions to their success.”

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Forte Foundation Video Blog

The MBA Video Diaries: This fall, Forté Foundation debuted their video blog, called The Forté MBA Video Diaries. Each week, three women correspondents from top business schools around the country chat about their business school …

The MBA Video Diaries: This fall, Forté Foundation debuted their video blog, called The Forté MBA Video Diaries. Each week, three women correspondents from top business schools around the country chat about their business school experience. All three are first year MBA students. So far, we’ve heard about surviving the first round of mid-terms, carving out a social life in b-school, what it’s like to be a woman in a mostly male MBA class, and other candid topics.

To view the video blog, visit http://www.fortefoundation.org/podcasts.
New installments are added every Thursday throughout the first semester.

Podcasts: This fall also marks the second seasons of their podcast series,
The MBA Value Proposition. Monthly podcast episodes feature interviewsvwith admissions officers, alumnae and executives.

This month, the podcast features interviews with Carolyn Bao, Senior
Product Marketing Manager at Yahoo! and Tawana Murphy Burnette, Brand
Manager at Leapfrog. They talk about the value of an MBA in their careers.
We also hear from admissions officers at Dartmouth College, Tuck School of
Business
; Washington University, Olin School of Business; and University of
Michigan, Ross School of Business
. They talk about how to write a winning
essay, and finding the right career after business school.

To listen online or subscribe to the series, visit:
http://www.fortefoundation.org/podcasts

Forté Foundation is dedicated to encouraging women to pursue
careers in business leadership by providing access to information,
scholarships and networking opportunities. Forté is backed by 26 leading
corporations, 32 top business schools in the U.S. and abroad, and The
Graduate Management Admission Council® (GMAC®).

For more information, contact Forté at info@fortefoundation.org

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