Tag Archives: Haas School of Business

Students Influence Business School Brands

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News — Strictly Business blog. What brand image comes to mind when you think of Harvard Business School? Is it the same image for the Haas School of …

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News — Strictly Business blog.

What brand image comes to mind when you think of Harvard Business School? Is it the same image for the Haas School of Business at the University of California””Berkeley, or the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business? Every elite management program has its own distinct brand, which has relatively little to do with rankings or test scores and everything to do with the school’s culture and mindset.

Then along came social media, a seismic disturbance to the status quo. In today’s über-networked world, business schools no longer have any ability to control their brand image in cyberspace.

The latest issue of Graduate Management News takes a look at this intersection of students, social media, school branding, and admissions. At the Graduate Management Admission Council‘s annual conference last month in Boston, panel moderator Rich D’Amato, GMAC’s vice president of global communications, confirmed what business schools have long feared: The school is no longer the sole source of news, and the story is in the hands of students and faculty in ways it hasn’t been before. To address that new reality, the conference hosted three distinct sessions related to using the latest social media tools.

A session titled “Lose Control, Get Attention: The Art of Getting Noticed in a Socially Networked News Cycle” covered the overlapping worlds of mainstream and social media, as well as the importance of authentic student voices in social media. D’Amato told admissions and other business school professionals that schools need to “engage the social media space directly, consistently, openly, and happily”¦otherwise, the school’s story, news, and brand will wind up under someone else’s control.”

Panelist Omar Wasaw, a Harvard Ph.D. candidate and internet pioneer, urged attendees to recast their thinking of the issue, saying: “It’s not so much losing control””it’s that your role is changing from facilitator to director”¦The trick is, how do you create the infrastructure and get out of the way?”

Tom Rose, a recent graduate of the MIT Sloan School of Management who spoke on the panel with classmate Miro Kazakoff, called student voices in social media “unmined gold” for business schools. Both said endorsements from MIT alumni found through social media were a major factor in their decisions to enroll. The duo started the irreverent video blog The M.B.A. Show while at Sloan, and as Kazakoff acknowledged, “Despite our silliness, we realize we are yoked to our school.”

Whether the content comes from school-hosted student blogs, independent M.B.A. student bloggers, YouTube videos, Twitter, or on Facebook, business schools must accept that the fastest way to update their brand is to relinquish control of it. At last year’s Social Integration Conference in New York, HBS’s Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Brian Kenny noted that the benefits of using these platforms to promote faculty work and outreach to prospective students outweigh the occasional run-ins with inappropriate””or downright embarrassing””content.

Panelist Ken White, executive director of marketing communications at the University of Maryland Smith School of Business, thinks schools shouldn’t worry too much about what students may say or do via social media channels. Business students have made a considerable investment in order to benefit from a certain school brand and culture. They recognize that their personal brands and the school’s brand are intertwined””and the stronger the school’s brand, the stronger their own, White said.

Making that connection between the school’s and the students’ brands is vital, because the truth is, the school is its customers (i.e., the students). The top M.B.A. programs wouldn’t be positioned as they are if not for the graduates who have gone on to do great things. As Wasaw noted at the conference, current students have a stake in the quality of future students. Therefore, they do own and should influence the brand.

Posted in General | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Berkeley Trustee Gifts $1M to Endow Haas Scholarship Fund

UC Berkeley Trustee Dato’ Sri Dr. Tahir has given $1 million to the Haas School of Business for a new endowment fund to provide scholarships to international MBA students primarily from Asia, the school announced …

UC Berkeley Trustee Dato’ Sri Dr. Tahir has given $1 million to the Haas School of Business for a new endowment fund to provide scholarships to international MBA students primarily from Asia, the school announced earlier this week.

International students have had limited access to U.S. loans for the past three years, as most lenders now require a U.S. citizen or permanent resident as co-cosigner. The Tahir Fellowship Endowment Fund will help the Haas School attract more Asian applicants to its full-time Berkeley MBA Program.

The MBA admissions office will identify prospective scholarship recipients, and the amount of awards will be flexible and dependent on available funds. The school says that each gift will be matched by the UC Berkeley Graduate Fellowships Matching Program.

Tahir, who joined the Berkeley Board of Trustees as its first trustee from Southeast Asia in 2007, says Indonesians view UC Berkeley as one of the top business school destinations. “I hope that the fellowship fund will set an example of giving back, especially for students who benefit from the fellowship,” says Tahir. “When they graduate and become successful in business, I hope they will remember their appreciation for the fellowship and will give to support another fellowship fund.”

Haas School’s Dean Rich Lyons expressed his gratitude for Tahir’s contribution, saying, “Top business schools compete intensely to attract the very best students in the market, and diversity, including international student representation, is an important goal. Dr. Tahir’s gift will greatly improve our ability to achieve this goal.”

Posted in General, School News | Tagged , , , , , ,

Tuesday Tips – UC Berkeley Haas MBA Essay Tips

Approaching the new set of Haas Business School questions may be intimidating, as you are required to answer six questions that focus on a variety of attributes and accomplishments, while you are being judged upon …

Approaching the new set of Haas Business School questions may be intimidating, as you are required to answer six questions that focus on a variety of attributes and accomplishments, while you are being judged upon “a strong cultural fit with our program and defining principles.” A clear understanding of your application strategy ”“ particularly your career goals and strengths/weaknesses will be key to put together a cohesive application.

Haas Business School short answers require focus, at only 250 words you will need to answer concisely and clearly to make sure your point is communicated. While challenging, this is also an opportunity to demonstrate several different aspects of your personality to the admissions committee.

As Haas Business School asks for your career goals last, the admissions committee will be getting to know you as a person before they understand what you are planning to do with your future. Make sure your career goals aren’t a huge surprise at the end, and that they logically flow from your attitude, personality and experiences.

For more information on the question and deadlines, visit the blog post on the new Haas questions.

1. What brings you the greatest joy? How does this make you distinctive? (250 word maximum)
Similar to what matters most, and why, this question seeks to get at your core values. What do you wake up in the middle of the night thinking about? (You may want to keep a pencil by your bed to get your creative thoughts flowing!) What common threads have been woven throughout your life, whether altruistic, artistic or personal?

Haas asked a similar question last year, and a new aspect is the second part where you are asked how your passion or joy makes your distinctive. Your passion is inherently distinctive because it reflects your unique core values, though it may appear standard on the surface. Delve deep into your own motivations for what gives you the greatest joy, and anything in your background that has shaped your feelings. For example, perhaps your greatest joy is something fairly typical like spending time with friends and family. Take the time to think about WHY this is your greatest joy ”“ perhaps you are part of a tight knit family with unique values that you can discuss, or maybe you moved a lot as a kid and so your friendships feel precious. Whatever unique aspects of your background inform your joy can be relevant to the question.

2. What is your most significant accomplishment. (250 word maximum)
Your accomplishment can be big or small, but it should be significant to you. While you have limited space, this is an opportunity to demonstrate what matters to you and to showcase one of your proudest moments.

While you are asked only about the accomplishment, the best essays will use this limited space to demonstrate clearly what the accomplishment was (be specific!) as well as commenting upon the significance of the accomplishment.

3. Describe a time when you questioned an established practice or thought within an organization. How did your actions create positive change? (250 word maximum)
The situational question would like to see your values in action as part of the question. When approaching a situational essay like this it’s important to provide both a concrete example and to explain what you thought, felt and did during the situation.

4. Describe a time when you were a student of your own failure. What specific insight from this experience has shaped your development? (250 word maximum)
This question asks you to think about a time you failed, and a time you learned from that failure. This essay is your opportunity to demonstrate your maturity, flexibility and leadership qualities. Leaders are not people who are always successful, rather they are people who are willing to admit to failure and learn from difficulty.

As you recount your failure it will be crucial to demonstrate what you have learned as concretely as possible. As a thought experiment, try thinking about a recent triumph. Trace your life events backwards until you find a failure, and think about how that failure directly led to your success. For example, perhaps you took a job immediately after college that was not a good fit for you. You may have felt like the job was a failure, but instead of despairing you took the time to think about what you really wanted, and subsequently found a job that led you success in your career. Perhaps your story isn’t career oriented but showcases learning from extracurricular or volunteer involvement.

5. Describe a time when you led by inspiring or motivating others toward a shared goal. (250 word maximum)
In this essay you will want to think about a specific leadership experience and what you did, said, felt and accomplished. At the same time, you need to focus specifically on how you motivated your team and inspired a group of people to accomplish a shared goal. You may not have *done* a great deal in the situation, but the key aspect is how you helped your team to be stronger and better through inspiration and motivation.

Leadership can be expressed in many ways in your life. Perhaps you lead a team of people at work, or in a volunteer capacity. If you do not have a formal leadership role you might have led a project or contributed as a strong leader from a team perspective. Whichever type of leadership experience you had, make sure to provide specifics of the situation. Strong results always stand out!

6. a. What are your post-MBA short-term and long-term career goals? How have your professional experiences prepared you to achieve these goals?
b. How will an MBA from Haas help you achieve these goals? (1000 word maximum for 6a. and 6b.)

This is a fairly typical career goals essay that asks for both short- and long-term goals and the background that led you to this juncture in your career. Think about what you hope to achieve with your MBA and the career opportunities it will reveal for you. You don’t need to recite your resume here ”“ rather highlight the key experiences that will be relevant in your future career.
Be specific about why the Haas School of Business is the right program to pursue your goals as well. As you consider your past experiences and your future goals you will be able to see what you want to gain from the Haas experience to fill any gaps. If you have an advertising background and want to become a brand manager you’ll likely need classes in operations and finance to understand the analytical side of brand management. Other goals will require other skills and your own unique background will inform how you take advantage of the Haas experience. Make sure you have determined exactly what courses make sense for your career goals and the programs and clubs that you will participate in to reach your personal and professional goals.

* Are you on Facebook? Join our Facebook Page for news, contests and giveaways!

* Follow us on Twitter for breaking MBA news!

Posted in Application Tips, UC Berkeley Haas Advice | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Haas School of Business Posts Updated Essay Questions

The Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley has released the essay questions for the fall 2012 application. Click here for the deadlines, posted on the blog last week. What brings you the greatest joy? …

The Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley has released the essay questions for the fall 2012 application. Click here for the deadlines, posted on the blog last week.

  1. What brings you the greatest joy? How does this make you distinctive? (250 word maximum)
  2. What is your most significant accomplishment? (250 word maximum)
  3. Describe a time when you questioned an established practice or thought within an organization. How did your actions create positive change? (250 word maximum)
  4. Describe a time when you were a student of your own failure. What specific insight from this experience has shaped your development? (250 word maximum)
  5. Describe a time when you led by inspiring or motivating others toward a shared goal. (250 word maximum)
  6. a. What are your post-MBA short-term and long-term career goals? How have your professional experiences prepared you to achieve these goals?
    b. How will an MBA from Haas help you achieve these goals? (1000 word maximum for 6a. and 6b.)

The application goes live in August, so until then, visit the Haas admissions website for more information.

Posted in School News | Tagged , , , ,

Haas School of Business Releases Deadlines

The University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business has announced the deadlines for the 2011-2012 MBA application season. The four deadlines are: Round One Deadline: October 12, 2011 Notification: January 12, 2012 Round Two …

The University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business has announced the deadlines for the 2011-2012 MBA application season.

The four deadlines are:

Round One
Deadline: October 12, 2011
Notification: January 12, 2012

Round Two
Deadline: December 1, 2011
Notification: March 1, 2012

Round Three
Deadline: January 18, 2012
Notification: April 12, 2012

Round Four
Deadline: March 7, 2012
Notification: May 17, 2012

The application will be available in August. For more information about the Haas MBA, please visit the admissions website.

Posted in School News | Tagged , , , ,

MBA Case Competition Winners Roundup

Winning a case competition during b-school is a great honor – and it won’t look bad on your post-MBA resume, either. Here is a roundup of a few schools whose students have taken first place in some recent case competitions.

Winning a case competition during b-school is a great honor – and it won’t look bad on your post-MBA resume, either. Here is a roundup of a few schools whose students have taken first place in some recent case competitions.

Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley – Haas students have distinguished themselves by placing first in not one but two recent case competitions. Earlier this month, a team of Berkeley students won the Wells Fargo MBA Case Competition, which asked competitors to formulate an optimal financing solution for an acquisition and capital expenditures. A separate team of Berkeley MBAs won the UNC Real Estate Development Challenge at Kenan-Flagler, which awarded the team that created the best redevelopment proposal.

Kelley School of Business, Indiana UniversityPurdue University’s Global Supply Chain Case Competition attracted teams from 22 MBA programs, and the Kelley team put together the top medical supply funding and distribution solution for a fictitious African nation. “I think the judges rewarded our team because we told a cohesive story that communicated the problem, the solution and the summary very clearly and understandably,” said team member Ben Cober in a Kelley press release.

Owen Graduate School of Management, Vanderbilt University – A group of Owen MBAs bested 96 other groups from 48 schools worldwide to win the Avnet Supply Chain Challenge. The competition asked students to operate “a make-to-order factory by managing a series of forecasting, capacity, inventory and contract decisions,” according to an Owen press release. Separately, another Owen student was on the winning team of the  2011 UNC Kenan-Flagler Marketing Case Challenge, along with MBA colleagues from Carnegie-Mellon, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and William & Mary.

Rutgers Business School – Rutgers MBAs won the 2011 Kellogg School Biotech and Healthcare Case Competition, which asked teams to develop a forecast for a newly approved drug. Of 46 groups, Kellogg’s home team came in third, and another group of Haas case competition achievers came in second.

Posted in General | Tagged , , , , ,