Tag Archives: Harvard Business School

INSEAD Tops Latest FT Global MBA Rankings

Earlier this week, the Financial Times released its 2016 Global MBA Rankings, and for the first time since the ranking’s launch in 1999, a business school with a strong Asian presence—INSEAD—takes the top spot, rising …

Earlier this week, the Financial Times released its 2016 Global MBA Rankings, and for the first time since the ranking’s launch in 1999, a business school with a strong Asian presence—INSEAD—takes the top spot, rising from fifth place in 2015.

INSEAD financial times global mba rankings

INSEAD, the international business school with campuses in Singapore, Abhu Dahbi, and Fontainebleau, France, also makes history in this particular ranking as it is the first time FT has crowned a one-year MBA program. INSEAD was the first business school in the world to offer a one-year MBA program beginning in 1959.

“As the cost of studying for an MBA has steadily risen, many students are wary of taking on the debt associated with two-year degrees — students are frequently more than $100,000 in debt when they graduate. Though fees and living costs can be substantial, it is often the opportunity cost of lost salary that is the biggest factor,” write FT’s Della Bradshaw and Laurent Ortmans.

This year’s ranking shows a bit more movement than we saw last year, when FT deemed Harvard Business School the top MBA program for the third time in a row. U.S. MBA programs continue to dominate the top ten with seven schools, but this year, Spain’s IESE Business School slipped to 16th place, down from seventh place. Meanwhile, Cambridge Judge Business School comes in at number 10 this year, up from 13th in 2015.

Top Ten FT Global MBA Ranking 2016

  1. INSEAD
  2. Harvard Business School
  3. London Business School
  4. University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School
  5. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  6. Columbia Business School
  7. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  8. Chicago Booth School of Business
  9. MIT Sloan School of Management
  10. Cambridge-Judge Business School

One interesting development to come out of these latest rankings is the increase in the numbers of women pursuing the MBA. “In 2015, 35 per cent of MBA students were women, up from 30 per cent in 2005. Last year, the proportion of female students topped 40 per cent in 27 schools, a leap from just four schools 10 years ago,” Ortmans reports.

The Financial Times ranking methodology involves assessing MBA programs according to the career progression of alumni, the school’s idea generation, and the diversity of students and faculty. FT data from the past three years is used for alumni-informed criteria.

For more information, visit FT‘s 2016 Global MBA ranking analysis and school profiles.

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Round 2 Update from HBS Admissions

On Friday, Harvard Business School‘s director of MBA admissions, Dee Leopold, shared the following details regarding Round 2 interview invitations: Interview invitations will go out in two waves: January 27 and February 3 All candidates …

Harvard Business School round 2 interviews

On Friday, Harvard Business School‘s director of MBA admissions, Dee Leopold, shared the following details regarding Round 2 interview invitations:

  • Interview invitations will go out in two waves: January 27 and February 3
  • All candidates not being invited to interview will receive notice of their “release” on February 3
  • All 2+2 candidates will receive an invitation or be released on February 3
  • Interviews will take place between February 11 and March 4
  • Campus Interview Days will offer opportunities for class visits, student and faculty panels, and campus tours
  • Hub cities this round are:
    • London, Paris, Mumbai, Dubai, Tokyo, Menlo Park, and NYC

Our advice here at Stacy Blackman Consulting for anyone interviewing at Harvard Business School is this:

As you prepare for your interview, one of the most important tips to remember is to sound natural—not scripted—during the exchange.  Instead of trying to remember and include every last one of your memorized bullet points, focus on succinctly answering only the question at hand.

If you can get from point A to point B in a clear, logical way; maintain an open, friendly, and professional demeanor; dress appropriately; and have an inquisitive attitude about the school and all it has to offer students, you stand a very good chance of coming out of the interview with flying colors.

Good luck, HBS applicants!

You may also be interested in:

How to Make a Positive Impression on the HBS Admissions Team

HBS Students Offer Interview Tips

HBS Admissions Director Talks GMAT/GRE Scores

HBS Admissions Director Leopold to Step Down in May 2016

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Harvard Business School Expands Peek Program for 2016

Harvard Business School has announced the initial details for its 2016 Peek Weekend, an educational experience designed to give current college sophomores, juniors, and seniors insight into the Harvard MBA program. From Friday June 10th …

Harvard Business School has announced the initial details for its 2016 Peek Weekend, an educational experience designed to give current college sophomores, juniors, and seniors insight into the Harvard MBA program.

HBS Peek Weekend

From Friday June 10th to Sunday June 12th, Peek Weekend participants will visit the HBS campus in Boston to develop a broader understanding of the challenges leaders face, the many dimensions inherent in the business world, and the impact participants can have on their community and the world through organizational leadership.

Peek, which began in 2015 focusing on candidates from women’s colleges, will expand its applicant pool this year. The 2016 Weekend will include three cohorts, with each cohort having its own specific curriculum in addition to joint sessions for all Peek participants. Students should be in the Class of 2016, 2017 or 2018 and meet one of the following criteria to attend the Weekend:

  • Be enrolled at a women’s college
  • Be majoring in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (the so-called STEM subjects)
  • Come from a family-owned business background

“These groups can be underrepresented in business school applicant pools,” says Dee Leopold, managing director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid at HBS. “We want to do all we can to ensure that our admissions process reaches as many qualified students as possible and help them understand the many different options and opportunities a Harvard MBA can lead to in a graduate’s life.”

Peek participants will learn from faculty members who teach MBA courses at Harvard Business School during the academic year. Using the case method of instruction that HBS pioneered in the teaching of management and leadership, professors will lead participant-based class discussions on current management challenges and opportunities.

Peek students will spend their evenings preparing for class by analyzing cases based on real companies and situations. In the mornings before class, they will form small study groups to discuss their ideas before joining the rest of their classmates. The Weekend experience will also include sessions with staff as well as current and former HBS students.

The 2016 Peek Weekend costs $500, which includes case materials, weekend accommodations in the school’s on-campus dormitories, and all meals. A limited number of need-based fellowships will be available. Students will learn about available financial aid awards after their acceptance to attend the Weekend. Applicants are encouraged to inquire about the possibility of additional funding from their own college or university.

The application for Peek 2016 goes live online at the beginning of March and will require eligible students to supply a resume, an undergraduate transcript, and an essay on a topic to be announced at a later date.

Materials will be due no later than noon on Thursday, April 21. There is no application fee. Decisions will be released at noon on Thursday, May 5.

Interested students can receive updates on the Weekend by joining the Peek mailing list: https://apply.hbs.edu/register/PeekInquiryForm

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HBS Opens Workspace for Alumni in NYC

Harvard Business School has announced it will open its first workspace for HBS alumni startups in New York City, which will act as both an ecosystem for high potential ventures, and a community gathering space …

Harvard Business School has announced it will open its first workspace for HBS alumni startups in New York City, which will act as both an ecosystem for high potential ventures, and a community gathering space for alumni who are part of the NYC startup culture.

entrepreneurship at HBS

The new HBS Startup Studio will feature:

  • 3,000 square feet of subsidized co-working space for 8-10 alumni ventures
  • Collaboration and community building with other HBS Alumni founders in NYC
  • A director and a coordinator on staff to support you in your venture
  • Access to programs and events for founders, investors and other entrepreneurial focused HBS alumni.

We look forward to the groundbreaking of HBS’s first co-working space in NYC.  With so many amazing HBS-founded companies in NYC — including Rent the Runway, Birchbox, and Blue Apron – we expect that this will help fuel growth of the HBS and Harvard entrepreneurial ecosystem in the NYC area,” say the alumni co-heading the new workspace, Diana Dowling and Jasaon E. Klein.

As part of the Harvard Business School Arthur Rock Center for Entrepreneurship, the Startup Studio will be permanently located near Union Square, but while that space is being built out, will be temporarily located at the WeWork location at 39th and Broadway.  Teams will move to the new location in Spring of 2016.

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7 Podcasts to Feed Your Mind This Thanksgiving Weekend

When you finally emerge from your Tryptophan coma this Thanksgiving weekend and have a hankering for some food for thought, check out these illuminating B-school podcasts that cover entrepreneurship, creativity, leadership and marketing tactics. Professor …

When you finally emerge from your Tryptophan coma this Thanksgiving weekend and have a hankering for some food for thought, check out these illuminating B-school podcasts that cover entrepreneurship, creativity, leadership and marketing tactics.

MBA podcasts

Professor Dorie Clark at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business talks about what it takes to succeed in business today. Whether you’re an entrepreneur or an employee, it’s all about standing out.

From the online publication Kellogg Insight, October’s faculty podcast features two Kellogg School of Management professors and a lecturer about the power of storytelling, as well as their tips to become a better storyteller.

Wendy Huber, Assistant Dean for the Full-Time MBA Program at Darden School of Business offers tips on how to achieve success in business school.

Harvard Business School launched a podcast series this fall called Cold Call, and the episode “Dangerous Mines: Saving Lives Through Leadership” stresses safety in South Africa’s platinum mines.

Brit Morin, founder and CEO of Brit + Co, discusses Inspiring Creativity with Great Content in this podcast from Entrepreneurial Thought Corner at Stanford University.

Nicholas Epley, professor of behavioral science at Chicago Booth School of Business, debunks some dangerous myths about gender differences.

This one falls under the marketing category, but it’s also just really fun and interesting for anyone headed to see “Spectre” this weekend. The Wharton School‘s Knowledge@Wharton publication offers this new podcast: The Spy Whom We Loved: The Enduring Appeal of James Bond.

We hope you enjoy this little bit of brain food and find something useful—and interesting—in each of these suggestions.

Image credit: Flickr user Patrick Breitenbach (CC By 2.0)

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Applying to Business School With Limited Work Experience

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com There is no single right time to go to business school. Every MBA applicant has his or her own unique professional goals and …

Without an established career trajectory to highlight, younger applicants must be able to point to a stellar academic record.

Without an established career trajectory to highlight, younger applicants must be able to point to a stellar academic record.

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com

There is no single right time to go to business school. Every MBA applicant has his or her own unique professional goals and timetable, and while the vast majority of candidates still log three to five years on the job before applying, required work experience has been trending downward over the past decade.

We’ll likely see age and work experience requirements continue to shift, as data show that test-takers under 24 have been the fastest-growing demographic for the GMAT exam.

There are, however, certain types of applicants that set their sights on an MBA right after graduation. Some applicants do so because they don’t want to have to leave the workforce and put their life on hold for two years. The opportunity cost is the largest cost component of an MBA, and that financial sacrifice is lowest in the early career stage.

Other candidates may be thinking about when to start a family, and early entrance to business school would allow many women to establish their careers before having children. Female enrollment in elite business schools lags significantly behind men and tops out at around 40 percent in this year’s incoming class?, but the number of men and women enrolling in medical and law school is fairly evenly split, partially because both of these graduate programs continue straight after university.

Those thinking of applying to business school immediately after college or those with less than three years of work experience, should make an honest assessment of their academic profile, career goals and most crucially, examples of leadership. Also, research which business schools are open to younger, less experienced applicants.? Not all are welcoming to this group, and you don’t want to waste time applying to MBA programs that really value significant work experience.

School websites typically state their preference where work experience is concerned. Additionally, the class profile may also include data on where students fall in terms of their professional background.

Without an established career trajectory to highlight, younger applicants must be able to point to a stellar academic record that includes an exceptional undergrad GPA and GMAT or GRE scores that are through the roof. Any noteworthy scholarships or awards received in college should be included as well.?

The MBA is often used as a way for people to switch careers. Since younger applicants aren’t yet on a firm path, those with little experience need to be able to clearly articulate both short and long-term professional goals, and convince the admissions committee that the degree is critical to helping them reach those goals.

MBA programs that court younger applicants do so because they know that the degree is an excellent way to accelerate the development of rising leaders. Early-career applicants may have fewer work experiences, but the admissions committee is more interested in the quality than the quantity.

Leadership examples should therefore be exceptional. Maybe you worked for the family business in a pivotal role, started your own company or have shown strong leadership in an extracurricular setting.

When we first met our client Anita, she was a college senior at Northwestern University and thought that Harvard Business School‘s 2+2 program for younger applicants was perfect for her, as she would get two years of real-world work experience before returning for a two-year MBA program.

As an economics major, Anita knew that she would be competing with other students with great stats, so she and her consultant chose to emphasize her leadership experiences instead. While in college, Anita had organized a casual group of fellow long-distance runners to raise money for charity, and after several successful runs, she joined up as a local chapter of a national charity running organization.

Anita and her consultant created a narrative of leading younger people that started with Anita’s time as a Girl Scout leader, followed by her Big Sister mentorship, and continued with her resident adviser and orientation leader positions as a college junior and senior.

By highlighting Anita’s leadership qualities and showing how Harvard’s 2+2 program would help shape Anita’s future in the business world, she and her consultant created a strong application that ultimately earned her admission at her dream program.

While younger, less experienced candidates have a tougher time landing a seat at a top business school, MBA programs are definitely becoming more open to including them in the mix. Admissions committees put much consideration into who they will admit each year, and these days, creating a rich and diverse classroom experience often means including the voices of strong early-career students as well.

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