Tag Archives: Harvard Business School

B-School Profs Offer Strategies for the Networking-Averse

Everyone knows that a huge part of the b-school experience is creating a network that you’ll be tapping into for the rest of your career. But what if you’re naturally shy, or simply hate the …

Shy guy

Everyone knows that a huge part of the b-school experience is creating a network that you’ll be tapping into for the rest of your career. But what if you’re naturally shy, or simply hate the idea of networking because it makes you feel phony, opportunistic, or just plain “dirty”?

The majority of international students at U.S. MBA programs come from Asia, where the cultural differences related to networking are stark. Even European students often find it awkward to send introductory emails or chat up strangers at networking events. Career centers in turn worry these cultural differences put international students at a disadvantage during their internship and job searches.

In the May issue of Harvard Business Review, professors Tiziana Casciaro of the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, Francesca Gino of Harvard Business School, and Marvam Kouchaki of Kellogg School of Management share strategies for making networking not only more bearable, but perhaps even enjoyable for the networking-averse among us.

The quickest way to flip the switch in your negative mindset about networking? Stop making it about you.

For example, at a networking event, take the focus off of yourself and instead focus on the other people at the event. The researchers discovered that when people focus on how they can help others — instead of how others can help them — the act of networking suddenly takes on a different tone.

“When you think more about what you can give to others than what you can get from them,” they write, “networking will seem less self-promotional and more selfless — and therefore more worthy of your time.”

The professors offer other strategies to help the reluctant among us recast networking in a more positive light, including how you can make the focus about learning, identify common interests, or assign a higher purpose to the practice. Take a look at the original article on Harvard Business Review and see if their tips alleviate some of the discomfort you’ve been feeling up til now.

You may also be interested in:

Use Your Network to help You Get Into Business School
3 Ways to Get a Head Start When Building Your B-School Network

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Harvard Business School Breaks Ground on Klarman Hall

Late last week, Harvard Business School officially broke ground for Klarman Hall, a new convening center to be constructed on the HBS campus. Expected to open in 2018, Klarman Hall will combine elements of a …

Klarman Hall at Harvard Business School

Late last week, Harvard Business School officially broke ground for Klarman Hall, a new convening center to be constructed on the HBS campus. Expected to open in 2018, Klarman Hall will combine elements of a large-scale conference center, a performance space, and an intimate community forum.

Harvard Business School hosts some 700 events a year in which tens of thousands of people from around the world participate in a wide variety of activities, from research conferences to symposia to cultural events. With the addition of Klarman Hall, HBS seeks to convene these key voices to discuss and address the critical issues facing our times.

The building was made possible by a donation from Seth and Beth Klarman. Seth Klarman is president and CEO of The Baupost Group, a Boston-based investment management firm. Beth Klarman is president of the Klarman Family Foundation. Both are members of the School’s Board of Dean’s Advisors.

Klarman Hall is being designed by the Boston-based firm of William Rawn and Associates as a vibrant space with an eye toward flexibility, adaptability, and accessibility

“When you bring together people with talent, vision, and ambition in a space designed specifically to facilitate connections, conversation, and debate, the potential for transformative ideas and action is limitless,” said Seth Klarman.

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4 Key Career Benefits From MBA Programs

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com Business school graduates benefit not only from a solid return on investment through substantial salary increases, but also by deepening the knowledge, skills …

career benefits of MBA

In one survey, 96 percent of employers said hiring business school graduates creates value for their companies.

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com

Business school graduates benefit not only from a solid return on investment through substantial salary increases, but also by deepening the knowledge, skills and abilities they will need for future professional success.

Here are just four of the key career benefits MBA programs can offer.

1. Transferable skills: Business school gives you new skills and knowledge that will turbocharge your career. While MBA students often set their sights on a job in finance or consulting, the hard and soft skills acquired during an MBA program are transferable to myriad other roles. Today, you’ll find an increasing number of MBAs working in tech, health care, consumer goods, government and nonprofits, and many other industries.

The skills typically strengthened during an MBA – leadership, intellectual creativity, analysis and critical thinking, cross-cultural awareness, communication, even greater IT mastery – will serve you well as you find your way toward your ultimate career goal.

You may start out at a financial firm such as Morgan Stanley and learn a tremendous amount about banking and analysis before deciding that it’s not a good fit, as happened with my client, May. She built upon those skills when she eventually became involved with running a business as a gourmet food importer. Once you have a deeper understanding of the complexities of the business world, those problem-solving skills mastered during your MBA will carry over to your next position, and the one after that, too.

2. Higher employment rates: Having an MBA is a powerful tool that can increase job security with your current employer or within your current industry. When the Graduate Management Admission Council released its latest annual poll of employers, it forecasted robust 2016 hiring that reflects high demand for MBA graduates. A whopping 96 percent of responding employers agreed that hiring business school graduates creates value for their companies.

The MBA degree is also a powerful differentiator in a crowded marketplace. Recruiters have said that some of their corporate clients will not consider any candidate without an MBA, which shows just how much business leaders value this qualification. Employers believe it vets potential hires; you can safely assume an MBA graduate from Harvard Business School or the Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania is going to bring considerable skills and business acumen to the job from day one.

Without a doubt, companies appreciate managers who have risen through the ranks, know the business inside and out and can get the job done. But they also like hiring MBAs for their ability to handle complex situations, be nimble and adapt in the face of a rapidly changing global environment. As outsiders, MBA hires can provide a broad or fresh perspective to see how to improve inefficiencies or come up with innovative solutions to business problems.

3. Degree specializations: Most MBA programs offer specializations or concentrations that allow you to do a deep dive into the nuances of a particular industry. These courses provide students with an opportunity to sample a few different industries or career paths to see whether it’s a good fit before taking the plunge.

Adding a concentration to an MBA is a good move for people who know exactly what they want to do with their career and who want to build a stronger skill base in that area. If you already know that you’re interested in something really specific, such as digital marketing, real estate, business analytics, social innovation, health care and so forth, earning an MBA with a concentration can make you even more marketable.

In today’s competitive job market, listing a concentration on your resume helps you stand out. However, if you are a career switcher and still testing the waters, you would be better off focusing on a general business education instead.

4. Networking opportunities: At business school, you’ll interact closely with talented individuals from all over the globe, which enhances the experience by exposing you to different business practices, cultures and points of view.

The connections you make are, for many, the single most valuable aspect of the MBA, so make sure you capitalize on the opportunities in and out of the classroom during your MBA studies. Your alumni network helps you stay connected to the university as well as to countless professional opportunities you can tap into throughout your career.

While the quality of the education at the most elite programs is guaranteed across the board, when you’re spending two years of your life and paying more than $100,000, it’s the network of contacts you build that make your MBA experience truly priceless.

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Harvard Business School Names New Head of MBA Admissions

A five-month search culminated yesterday with Harvard Business School’s announcement that Chad Losee, Harvard MBA Class of 2013, will be its next Managing Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. Losee will succeed Dee Leopold, …

new head of admissions at HBS

A five-month search culminated yesterday with Harvard Business School’s announcement that Chad Losee, Harvard MBA Class of 2013, will be its next Managing Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid.

Losee will succeed Dee Leopold, who has headed the school’s MBA selection process since 2006. Leopold will remain at HBS as Program Director for 2+2, a deferred admission process for students in college or full-time master’s programs.

After graduating from HBS in 2013 as a Baker Scholar (an academic honor awarded to the top 5% of the graduating class of some 900 students), Losee worked for a year as an HBS Leadership Fellow in the Dean’s Office. In that role, he collaborated with the school’s senior leadership on a range of strategic projects.

One such effort was at HBX, where Losee helped to launch and set strategy for this unique digital learning platform. In particular, he co-led the exam and credential strategy for CORe (Credential of Readiness), which teaches students the fundamentals of accounting, business analytics, and economics for managers.

In addition, he worked with HBS professor Clayton Christensen to develop an HBX course on Disruptive Strategy, an offering designed for executives around the world.

Losee also served as an observer with the HBS Admissions Board, evaluating prospective students during their interviews – an interest that had been piqued during his student days when he was an Admissions Ambassador for his HBS section, helping candidates during their visits to the campus. Losee has remained active as an HBS alumnus, serving a term on the HBS Alumni Board, one of about 70 graduates appointed to provide expertise and input to the School’s leaders.

I am a real believer in Harvard Business School’s mission to educate leaders who make a difference in the world, says Losee.

In 2014, Losee returned to Bain & Company’s Dallas office, where he had worked from 2008 to 2011, including a stint in Stockholm. As a manager at Bain, Losee has led consulting teams in client engagements across multiple industries. He graduated in 2008 from the Honors Program at Brigham Young University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in international relations summa cum laude.

“I’ve seen firsthand how my classmates, the amazing body of HBS alumni, and the outstanding faculty and staff all strive to shape the world around them for the better,” Losee says.

“The experience of a two-year, full-time MBA at HBS continues to have a great impact on me personally and as a leader. My goal as Dee’s successor is to make sure that each diverse MBA class continues to have a transformative experience at HBS and go on to make a real difference in the world.”

“We are delighted to welcome Chad back to the School and his family back to Boston,” said Jana Pompadur Kierstead, Executive Director of the MBA Program. “He has a deep understanding of HBS and its pedagogy and mission; superb interpersonal, analytical, and strategic skills; and a passion for admissions. That combination of talent and experience positions him well to lead our Admissions and Financial Aid teams.”

Losee will begin his new role in June.

Image credit: Harvard Business School

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B-School Deans to Discuss Future of Management Ed.

“Focusing on creating flexible, adept leaders is critical for business schools to continue attracting top talent,” says Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School. This underlying sentiment will serve as the foundation for a landmark …

Columbia Centennial Symposium

“Focusing on creating flexible, adept leaders is critical for business schools to continue attracting top talent,” says Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School. This underlying sentiment will serve as the foundation for a landmark discussion between the deans of the nation’s top business schools as they come together to address critical questions about the future of management education.

“My fellow panelists are all esteemed leaders in the field, and I am hopeful we will bring forward innovative approaches to bridging theory and practice in the curriculums, experiences, and ideas we offer students,” Hubbard adds.

The panel, entitled “What’s Next in Management Education,” is one of three to be held during Columbia Business School’s Centennial Symposium on May 2nd.

Jan Hopkins, former anchor and correspondent for CNN and owner of the Jan Hopkins Group, will moderate the conversation, which will feature deans from the business schools of Harvard, Stanford, Wharton and Columbia and address critical issues such as:

  • Will the MBA degree continue to be valued in the future?
  • How can business schools evolve to meet the demands of a changing economy?
  • What are the challenges and opportunities facing today’s MBA programs?

In addition to the panel on management education, the Symposium will feature two other panels. The first will explore the changing face of global business and examine how multinational companies can continue to flourish in a rapidly changing business environment. The second will focus on how business can define and identify value in the twenty-first century.

As one of the premier events of Columbia Business School’s centennial celebration, this Symposium will commemorate the school’s landmark achievements in key areas of business over the past century, while challenging thought leaders in management education to look to the future and examine the major forces that will impact business in the years ahead.

Photo Credit: Paul Warchol

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HBS Admissions Director on Applying in Round 3

To apply or not to apply in the final round, that is the perennial question. Harvard Business School‘s Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid, Dee Leopold, recently gave a crystal-clear answer…for college seniors, at …

applying in round 3

To apply or not to apply in the final round, that is the perennial question. Harvard Business School‘s Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid, Dee Leopold, recently gave a crystal-clear answer…for college seniors, at least.

“If you are a college senior who has the bandwidth to complete an application, I think that you should,” Leopold says, noting that there’s really no downside risk other than missing out on the last weeks of college life to prep for the GMAT or GRE.

“The worst that can happen is that you get turned down to the very small 2+2 Program. Many current students at HBS found themselves in that situation, went out and joined the work world, and reapplied successfully,” she adds.

As for candidates with a few years of work experience under their belts, Leopold acknowledges the third round is more complicated since most of the seats in the Class of 2018 have already been taken and it may be difficult to get a visa.

Despite those potential challenges, the director clears up a few myths that may be keeping qualified candidates from considering Round 3. Contrary to popular wisdom, needs-based financial aid is just as available for last-round applicants as it is for Round 1 admits.

If you do apply and are not successful, rest assured you can reapply in the future with absolutely no negative repercussions.

One plus of Round Three is the quick turnaround time between interview invitations going out and final decisions coming down. Invites will be sent by April 20th at noon, and your fate will be revealed on May 11th.

As always, we at SBC suggest candidates submit only once they feel their application is as strong as possible. If you apply in the final round, do make use of the optional essay to explain why you waited so that the admissions committee doesn’t come to the conclusion that this is just a last-ditch effort after failing to receive an admit at another MBA program in an earlier round.

“We ALWAYS admit people from Round 3,” Leopold says. “And they are always very wonderful.”

You may also be interested in:

What are My Round 3 Chances?
Should You Consider Applying in Round 3?
Face the Challenge of Round 3 Business School Applications

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