Tag Archives: Harvard Business School

B-School Deans to Discuss Future of Management Ed.

“Focusing on creating flexible, adept leaders is critical for business schools to continue attracting top talent,” says Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School. This underlying sentiment will serve as the foundation for a landmark …

Columbia Centennial Symposium

“Focusing on creating flexible, adept leaders is critical for business schools to continue attracting top talent,” says Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School. This underlying sentiment will serve as the foundation for a landmark discussion between the deans of the nation’s top business schools as they come together to address critical questions about the future of management education.

“My fellow panelists are all esteemed leaders in the field, and I am hopeful we will bring forward innovative approaches to bridging theory and practice in the curriculums, experiences, and ideas we offer students,” Hubbard adds.

The panel, entitled “What’s Next in Management Education,” is one of three to be held during Columbia Business School’s Centennial Symposium on May 2nd.

Jan Hopkins, former anchor and correspondent for CNN and owner of the Jan Hopkins Group, will moderate the conversation, which will feature deans from the business schools of Harvard, Stanford, Wharton and Columbia and address critical issues such as:

  • Will the MBA degree continue to be valued in the future?
  • How can business schools evolve to meet the demands of a changing economy?
  • What are the challenges and opportunities facing today’s MBA programs?

In addition to the panel on management education, the Symposium will feature two other panels. The first will explore the changing face of global business and examine how multinational companies can continue to flourish in a rapidly changing business environment. The second will focus on how business can define and identify value in the twenty-first century.

As one of the premier events of Columbia Business School’s centennial celebration, this Symposium will commemorate the school’s landmark achievements in key areas of business over the past century, while challenging thought leaders in management education to look to the future and examine the major forces that will impact business in the years ahead.

Photo Credit: Paul Warchol

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HBS Admissions Director on Applying in Round 3

To apply or not to apply in the final round, that is the perennial question. Harvard Business School‘s Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid, Dee Leopold, recently gave a crystal-clear answer…for college seniors, at …

applying in round 3

To apply or not to apply in the final round, that is the perennial question. Harvard Business School‘s Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid, Dee Leopold, recently gave a crystal-clear answer…for college seniors, at least.

“If you are a college senior who has the bandwidth to complete an application, I think that you should,” Leopold says, noting that there’s really no downside risk other than missing out on the last weeks of college life to prep for the GMAT or GRE.

“The worst that can happen is that you get turned down to the very small 2+2 Program. Many current students at HBS found themselves in that situation, went out and joined the work world, and reapplied successfully,” she adds.

As for candidates with a few years of work experience under their belts, Leopold acknowledges the third round is more complicated since most of the seats in the Class of 2018 have already been taken and it may be difficult to get a visa.

Despite those potential challenges, the director clears up a few myths that may be keeping qualified candidates from considering Round 3. Contrary to popular wisdom, needs-based financial aid is just as available for last-round applicants as it is for Round 1 admits.

If you do apply and are not successful, rest assured you can reapply in the future with absolutely no negative repercussions.

One plus of Round Three is the quick turnaround time between interview invitations going out and final decisions coming down. Invites will be sent by April 20th at noon, and your fate will be revealed on May 11th.

As always, we at SBC suggest candidates submit only once they feel their application is as strong as possible. If you apply in the final round, do make use of the optional essay to explain why you waited so that the admissions committee doesn’t come to the conclusion that this is just a last-ditch effort after failing to receive an admit at another MBA program in an earlier round.

“We ALWAYS admit people from Round 3,” Leopold says. “And they are always very wonderful.”

You may also be interested in:

What are My Round 3 Chances?
Should You Consider Applying in Round 3?
Face the Challenge of Round 3 Business School Applications

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Harvard Bumps Stanford in Latest US News MBA Ranking

U.S. News & World Report today released the 2017 Best Graduate Schools rankings, designed to help prospective students research programs across six disciplines and evaluate the potential return on their investment. In the full-time MBA …

Harvard Business School-Flickr

U.S. News & World Report today released the 2017 Best Graduate Schools rankings, designed to help prospective students research programs across six disciplines and evaluate the potential return on their investment.

In the full-time MBA rankings, Harvard University is the No. 1 program in the country. The University of Chicago—Booth moves up two places to tie with Stanford Graduate School of Business at No. 2. This is Booth’s highest placement ever in this list, and the first time in seven years that Stanford GSB has been knocked out of the first place ranking held either on its own or tied with another school.

Yale School of Management, meanwhile, has achieved its highest ranking ever on this list, tied for eighth place with Dartmouth’s Tuck School after finishing at No. 13 last year. For anyone wondering what happened to NYU Stern School of Business, which ranks 20th this year, according to a blog post by US News’s rankings guru Bob Morse, it’s because Stern did not provide complete data in time for use in calculating the rankings.

Among part-time MBA programs, the Haas School of Business at the University of California—Berkeley remains No. 1, Chicago Booth comes in second, Kellogg School of Management is No. 3, UCLA Anderson School of Management is No. 4, and Michigan Ross School of Business rounds out the top five.

Best Business Schools

1. Harvard School of Business
2. Stanford Graduate School of Business
2. University of Chicago Booth School of Business
4. University of Pennsylvania Wharton School
5. MIT Sloan School of Management
5. Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management
7. University of California—Berkeley Haas School of Business
8. Dartmouth College Tuck School of Business
8. Yale School of Management
10. Columbia School of Business

The six graduate disciplines U.S. News ranks annually are evaluated on factors such as employment rates for graduates, starting salary and standardized test scores of newly enrolled students. Because each graduate program is different, the rankings methodology varies across disciplines.

Different output measures are available for different fields, U.S. News explains, saying that in business, they use starting salaries and the ability of new MBAs to find jobs upon graduation or three months later.

“Going to graduate school is a major commitment of time and money,” said Anita Narayan, managing editor of Education at U.S. News. “Our rankings and advice offer guidance throughout the decision-making process to help prospective students and their families find the right fit.”

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What Are My Round 3 Chances?

Round 3 deadlines are nearly upon us, and while the final round is the biggest gamble of the application cycle, schools have that round for a reason and use it to admit those stellar students …

Round 3 MBA deadline

Round 3 deadlines are nearly upon us, and while the final round is the biggest gamble of the application cycle, schools have that round for a reason and use it to admit those stellar students that add something really special to their classes.

“We actually enjoy round three,” Dee Leopold, managing director of MBA admissions and financial aid at Harvard Business School, once told the Wall Street Journal. “It takes a certain amount of confidence to apply then. Those applicants march to their own drum, and we would never want to miss them.”

You should definitely use the required or optional MBA admission essays to explain to the admissions committee your reasons for waiting until the third – or final – round to apply. You don’t want anyone to jump to the conclusion that you are using round three as a last-ditch effort to get into business school in the fall after receiving rejections from other schools in earlier rounds.

Standing out from the pack is imperative, and never more so than when applying later in the game. As I mentioned in this US News blog post, if you want to do well in the admissions process, you have to communicate who you are, not just what you do.

That said, some schools offer students a better shot in the final round than others. According to a recent article in Poets and Quants, Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business is the most final round-friendly, followed by NYU Stern School of Business, INSEAD, and Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management.

The MBA admissions blog at Tuck School recently published a post on the realities of applying in Round 3, complete with anecdotes and advice from three recent graduates who applied in the April round (as it’s known at Tuck).

Finally, it’s important to have a Plan B in case things don’t go your way. You can always apply to a set of schools in round three knowing there is a good chance you will need to reapply to them and add in some new ones next season.

You may also be interested in:

Evaluate in Which Round to Submit Your B-School Application

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Multinational Cases Dominated in B-School ‘Oscars’

INSEAD and Harvard Business School were the top performers at the 2016 annual Case Centre Awards, a celebration of excellence in case writing and teaching from across the globe that are now considered the case …

Red Carpet

INSEAD and Harvard Business School were the top performers at the 2016 annual Case Centre Awards, a celebration of excellence in case writing and teaching from across the globe that are now considered the case method community’s annual ‘Oscars.’

Awards for cases are presented for nine management categories plus an Overall Winner Award. Each year, an award is made to recognize an individual who has made an Outstanding Contribution to the Case Method.

The Overall Winning Case, L’Oréal in China: Marketing Strategies for Turning Around Chinese Luxury Cosmetic Brand Yue Sai, was authored at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School by Haiyang Yang and at INSEAD by Pierre Chandon.

The case addresses an important business issue—marketing in emerging markets—and illustrates how even proven strategies need to be fundamentally reshaped to achieve success.

Case Centre AwardsChandon also won the Outstanding Contribution to the Case Method Award. According to the awards committee, Chandon  has elevated case teaching to another level at INSEAD and his many achievements include being the first to use online case surveys systematically in his teaching at INSEAD.

“To me, great cases are like reality TV: they are about real people and real companies, they have a story and a problem to be solved, and we desperately want to know what happens next – but they are not reality and nor should they be,” says Chandon.

“They are a simplified, stylised, version of reality, which allows us to understand the fundamental business issue at hand, while being embedded in an exciting context full of suspense.”

A new award debuted in 2015 for Outstanding Case Teacher, which recognizes an excellent practitioner in the case classroom. This year, the Outstanding Case Teacher competition was won by Harvard Business School’s Anita Elberse. This is the first year that students have been invited to provide nominations.

Elberse is one of the youngest female professors to have been promoted to full professor with tenure in Harvard Business School’s history. She develops and teaches an MBA course covering entertainment, media, and sports, called Strategic Marketing in Creative Industries, which is among the most sought-after courses in Harvard’s curriculum.

For a second consecutive year, winning cases showed a focus on multinational companies (eg GE, IKEA, L’Oréal), especially on those with a new media and technology basis (eg Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Uber).

Companies pioneering new and alternative approaches to technology and business leadership were strongly represented (eg AirThread, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), New York Times, Semco Partners, Tesla Motors).

“The results of The Case Centre Awards and Competitions 2016 reflect the diversity of faculty providing topical and relevant materials to the next generation of business people currently learning across the globe,” says Richard McCracken, Director of The Case Centre. “

“Top performers in 2016, INSEAD and Harvard Business School, are adding to their recent business school rankings successes, both demonstrable pedagogical excellence on their own campuses, and the impact of their original teaching materials in classrooms worldwide.”

The Case Centre is a non-profit organization that advances the case method worldwide, sharing knowledge, wisdom and experience to inspire and transform business education across the globe. The Case Centre Awards are in their 26th year and have been awarded on a global basis since 2011.

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INSEAD Tops Latest FT Global MBA Rankings

Earlier this week, the Financial Times released its 2016 Global MBA Rankings, and for the first time since the ranking’s launch in 1999, a business school with a strong Asian presence—INSEAD—takes the top spot, rising …

Earlier this week, the Financial Times released its 2016 Global MBA Rankings, and for the first time since the ranking’s launch in 1999, a business school with a strong Asian presence—INSEAD—takes the top spot, rising from fifth place in 2015.

INSEAD financial times global mba rankings

INSEAD, the international business school with campuses in Singapore, Abhu Dahbi, and Fontainebleau, France, also makes history in this particular ranking as it is the first time FT has crowned a one-year MBA program. INSEAD was the first business school in the world to offer a one-year MBA program beginning in 1959.

“As the cost of studying for an MBA has steadily risen, many students are wary of taking on the debt associated with two-year degrees — students are frequently more than $100,000 in debt when they graduate. Though fees and living costs can be substantial, it is often the opportunity cost of lost salary that is the biggest factor,” write FT’s Della Bradshaw and Laurent Ortmans.

This year’s ranking shows a bit more movement than we saw last year, when FT deemed Harvard Business School the top MBA program for the third time in a row. U.S. MBA programs continue to dominate the top ten with seven schools, but this year, Spain’s IESE Business School slipped to 16th place, down from seventh place. Meanwhile, Cambridge Judge Business School comes in at number 10 this year, up from 13th in 2015.

Top Ten FT Global MBA Ranking 2016

  1. INSEAD
  2. Harvard Business School
  3. London Business School
  4. University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School
  5. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  6. Columbia Business School
  7. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  8. Chicago Booth School of Business
  9. MIT Sloan School of Management
  10. Cambridge-Judge Business School

One interesting development to come out of these latest rankings is the increase in the numbers of women pursuing the MBA. “In 2015, 35 per cent of MBA students were women, up from 30 per cent in 2005. Last year, the proportion of female students topped 40 per cent in 27 schools, a leap from just four schools 10 years ago,” Ortmans reports.

The Financial Times ranking methodology involves assessing MBA programs according to the career progression of alumni, the school’s idea generation, and the diversity of students and faculty. FT data from the past three years is used for alumni-informed criteria.

For more information, visit FT‘s 2016 Global MBA ranking analysis and school profiles.

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