Tag Archives: Harvard Business School

Harvard Business School Crowned No. 1 By Poets & Quants

Poets & Quants released its 2015 MBA ranking this week, and Harvard Business School has reclaimed the title of world’s best business school after rebounding from second place last year. HBS has landed the top …

Harvard Business School ranked number 1

Poets & Quants released its 2015 MBA ranking this week, and Harvard Business School has reclaimed the title of world’s best business school after rebounding from second place last year. HBS has landed the top spot for five of the six years P&Q has published its composite ranking.

The school will continue to have a huge head start in maintaining that lead given its $3 billion endowment, which is three times the size of Stanford Graduate School of Business, its nearest competitor, notes P&Q editor John A. Byrne in Fortune. HBS has already raised more than $860 million toward the school’s $1 billion capital campaign, which still has three years remaining.

No rival beats Harvard in the formidable resources it brings to the game: more superstar professors than any other school, the diversity of its course offerings, the stellar quality of its students, the size and scope of its campus, and the career achievements of its alumni spread all over the world,” writes Byrnes.

Top Ten U.S. MBA Programs

  1. Harvard Business School
  2. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  3. Chicago Booth School of Business
  4. University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School
  5. Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management
  6. Columbia Business School
  7. MIT Sloan School of Management
  8. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  9. Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business
  10. Yale School of Management

Top Ten International MBA Programs

  1. INSEAD
  2. London Business School
  3. IESE Business School
  4. IE Business School
  5. HEC Paris
  6. IMD
  7. Cambridge Judge Business School
  8. ESADE
  9. SDA Bocconi
  10. Oxford Saïd Business School

According to Poets & Quants, the lineup of the best U.S. MBA programs combines the five most influential rankings but each is weighted separately to reflect P&Q’s view of their authority: U.S. News & World Report is given a weight of 35%, Forbes 25%, Bloomberg Businessweek 15%, The Financial Times 15%, and The Economist receives a weight of 10%.

“The list is far more stable–and reliable–than most rankings published elsewhere, taking into account a massive wealth of quantitative and qualitative data captured in these major lists, from surveys of corporate recruiters, MBA graduates, deans and faculty publication records to median GPA and GMAT scores of entering students as well as the latest salary and employment statistics of alumni,” Byrne explains.

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Kraft Foundation Donates $20M to HBS to Commercialize Science Research

The Robert and Myra Kraft Family Foundation has pledged $20 million to Harvard Business School to create the Kraft Endowment for Advancing Precision Medicine, the school announced this week. The pledge, which is part of …

The Robert and Myra Kraft Family Foundation has pledged $20 million to Harvard Business School to create the Kraft Endowment for Advancing Precision Medicine, the school announced this week. The pledge, which is part of Harvard University’s $6.5 billion capital campaign, was announced at the Partners Precision Medicine Conference yesterday at Harvard Medical School, with foundation president Robert Kraft in attendance.

(LtoR): Jonathan Kraft, Richard Hamermesh, Robert Kraft, Todd Golub, Robert Huckman Photo: Justin Knight

(LtoR): Jonathan Kraft, Richard Hamermesh, Robert Kraft, Todd Golub, Robert Huckman
Photo: Justin Knight

The Kraft Endowment will be used to support research and other activities that advance the field of precision medicine. Precision medicine is a growing movement in patient care that allows scientists and physicians to use genomic and other information to understand a disease based on its biological mechanisms and to precisely diagnose and develop tailored treatments.

The growth of the industry is hampered by gaps that exist between scientific discoveries and the development and commercialization of medical solutions for public benefit. The rising cost of clinical trials and a lack of collaboration among scientists, the pharmaceutical industry and investors also hinder growth.

Harvard Business School will collaborate with the Broad Institute, a pioneer in precision medicine, and others in Boston, to find ways to accelerate breakthroughs and advance commercialization of precision medicine by harnessing the energy and ideas of the medical, science and entrepreneurial communities in the city.

Myra Kraft, the wife of Robert and mother of Jonathan (MBA 1990), Daniel, Joshua (EdM 1993), and David (MBA 1999), died of ovarian cancer in 2011. Through her illness,  the Kraft family came to understand firsthand the promise of precision medicine.

“At heart, many of the challenges facing the advancement of precision medicine today are business challenges,” says HBS Dean Nitin Nohria. “We are honored that the Krafts, who epitomize Harvard Business School’s mission of educating leaders who make a difference in the world, see the potential for HBS to work with world-class organizations like the Broad to develop innovative and integrative new models — from organizational structures to collaborative data centers — that will position Boston at the epicenter of this arena in the future. The endowment is a wonderful and fitting tribute to Myra Kraft, who throughout her life devoted herself to helping others.”

To learn more about this gift, and the upcoming initial research pilots designed to accelerate the discovery and trials process, please click here.

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HBS Names New Group of Entrepreneurs-in-Residence

Harvard Business School’s Arthur Rock Center for Entrepreneurship is considered by many as the top program for entrepreneurial studies in the nation. One of many benefits HBS students can take advantage of is the experience …

Harvard Business School’s Arthur Rock Center for Entrepreneurship is considered by many as the top program for entrepreneurial studies in the nation. One of many benefits HBS students can take advantage of is the experience of the school’s annual cohort of Entrepreneurs-in-Residence.

entrepreneurship at Harvard Business School

Now celebrating its tenth anniversary, the program invites seasoned and successful entrepreneurs and investors to spend time on the HBS campus throughout the academic year, advising MBA students eager to start their own companies and working with faculty on research and course development.

The nineteen Entrepreneurs-in-Residence for 2015-16 are:

  • Ajay Agarwal (MBA 1995), a managing director at Bain Capital Ventures in Palo Alto, where he focuses on early-stage software, mobile, and internet investing.
  • Julia Austin, formerly of Akamai and VMware and currently an independent advisor and investor at Austinfish in Cambridge, MA, with an interest in early-stage companies across multiple verticals.
  • Stephen Bonner, formerly president and CEO of Cancer Treatment Centers of America and now a member of its board of directors.
  • David Chang (MBA 2001), a five-time entrepreneur/operator, angel investor in 35 startups, and leader in the entrepreneurship community who recently ran the PayPal Boston office.
  • Sam Clemens (MBA 2004), founder and chief product officer at InsightSquared in Cambridge, MA, whose expertise is in product management and development for business-to-business software startups.
  • Chuck Davis (MBA 1986), a venture partner with Technology Crossover Ventures in Los Angeles and CEO of Swagbucks, the leading online rewards and cash-back shopping program.
  • David Frankel (MBA 2003), founder and managing partner of Founder Collective, a seed-stage fund based in Boston and New York.
  • Janet Kraus, a serial entrepreneur who is now CEO of Peach, a startup that provides women with better fitting, more thoughtfully designed lingerie and basics in the privacy of their home.
  • Sharon Peyer (MBA 2006), founder and head of business development for Boston-based HitBliss, a digital equipment service.
  • Jules Pieri (MBA 1986), cofounder and CEO of The Grommet, a product launch platform in Somerville, MA, that has helped FitBit and SodaStream get off the ground.
  • Ruben Pinchanski (MBA 1993), cofounder of Digitas and an expert in building and advising e-commerce businesses.
  • Katie Rae, cofounder and managing director of Project 11, a venture fund in Boston that partners with early-stage startups to accelerate growth. She was previously managing director of TechStars Boston.
  • Duke Rohlen (MBA 2001), CEO of medical-device maker Spirox as well as chairman and CEO of Advanced Cardiac Therapeutics.
  • Rudina Seseri (MBA 2005), a partner at Fairhaven Capital in Boston, where she invests in startups, works with founders and executive teams, and develops strategies for growing businesses.
  • Jim Sharpe (MBA 1976), an entrepreneur with years of experience in running small and medium enterprises and turnarounds and meeting the challenges of work/life balance issues with his wife, also an HBS alum.
  • Martin Sinozich, founding partner of Venn Capital and an active angel investor and entrepreneur, with interests in fundraising and pitching, scaling rapid-growth businesses, and positioning closely-held businesses for exit.
  • Michael Skok, cofounding partner of Assemble.VC an active early stage venture fund. Michael has enabled billions of dollars of value creation as both a venture investor for the past 12 years and an entrepreneur of more than 20 years, and is the creator of the popular startupsecrets.com course he teaches at the Harvard Innovation Lab.
  • Jim Southern (MBA 1983), a founding partner of Pacific Lake Partners in Boston, which concentrates on small capitalization buyouts via the search fund model, and provides entrepreneurs with search and acquisition capital.
  • Russ Wilcox (MBA 1995), former CEO of E Ink, the company behind the display technology used in the Kindle and other e-readers.

Through a community of support, access to content, and a gateway to entrepreneurial ecosystems everywhere, the Rock Center helps students and alumni create ventures that revolutionize and galvanizes the entire HBS community with the energy and spirit for What’s Next.

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HBS Admissions Director Leopold to Step Down in May 2016

Managing Director of MBA Admissions & Financial Aid Dee Leopold, the voice of Harvard Business School admissions for the past decade, announced today that she will be moving on in May 2016 at the end …

HBS admissions director Dee Leopold

Managing Director of MBA Admissions & Financial Aid Dee Leopold, the voice of Harvard Business School admissions for the past decade, announced today that she will be moving on in May 2016 at the end of this admissions season.

In a brief post on her blog to officially announce the news to applicants, Leopold assures she will be on the job until the Class of 2018 is all set and ready to go.

“It’s Business As Usual in Dillon House,” the director writes, quoting the headline of her post. “I’ve told you many times that Dillonites are the Dream Team – and I will say it again. So please go back to figuring out how to Introduce Yourself and Round One interviewees should be making sure they have clean socks picked out for their interview!”

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Harvard Crowned No. 1 in Bloomberg Businessweek 2015 MBA Ranking

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Harvard Crowned No. 1 in Bloomberg Businessweek 2015 MBA Ranking

Bloomberg Businessweek has released its 2015 global rankings of best business schools, and Harvard Business School claims the number one spot among 74 full-time U.S. programs. Chicago Booth School of Business is number two, and …

 Harvard Business School ranked number 1Bloomberg Businessweek has released its 2015 global rankings of best business schools, and Harvard Business School claims the number one spot among 74 full-time U.S. programs. Chicago Booth School of Business is number two, and Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management is number three. Bloomberg Businessweek‘s top school of 2014, Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, fell to number eight.

Of 29 international MBA programs, Western University’s Ivey Business School in Ontario, Canada is number one (retaining its top spot in 2014’s ranking), London Business School is number two and INSEAD in Fontainebleau, France is number three.

Among the 74 part-time U.S. MBA programs evaluated, Northwestern’s Kellogg ranks number one, Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business ranks number two, and Rice University’s Jones Graduate School of Business ranks number three.

Top Ten Full-Time MBA Programs in 2015

  1. Harvard Business School
  2. Chicago Booth School of Business
  3. Kellogg School of Management
  4. MIT Sloan School of Management
  5. UPenn Wharton School
  6. Columbia Business School
  7. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  8. Duke/Fuqua School of Business
  9. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  10. Michigan Ross School of Business

For the first time, Bloomberg Businessweek says it has placed a sharper focus on what people most hope to find after business school—career growth and job satisfaction—and how well MBA programs promote both. Businessweek compiled what it calls its deepest and broadest set of data ever from over 13,150 current students, 18,540 alumni, and 1,460 recruiters across 177 business school programs.

According to the news magazine, the rankings are based on five measures:

1. Employer Survey (35 percent of total score): Recruiter feedback on the skills they look for in MBAs, and which programs best equip their students with those skills;

2. Alumni Survey (30 percent of total score): Feedback from the Classes of 2007, 2008, and 2009 on how their MBAs have affected their careers, their compensation change over time, and their mid-career job satisfaction;

3. Student Survey (15 percent of total score): The Class of 2015’s take on academics, career services, campus climate, and more;

4. Job Placement Rate (10 percent of total score): The most recent data on how many MBAs seeking full-time jobs get them within three months of graduation;

5. Starting Salary (10 percent of total score): The most recent data on how much MBAs make in their first jobs after graduation, adjusted for industry and regional variation.

“By refining our focus and updating our methodology, we’ve created the most effective ranking yet for helping career-oriented students choose an MBA program,” says Ellen Pollock, editor, Bloomberg Businessweek.

Not everyone agrees, however, that the updated methodology accurately reflects the standing of the best business schools in the land.

“Changes in methodology…result in vast swings in rankings that have nothing to do with the quality of an MBA program’s experience,” notes Poets & Quants editor John A. Byrne in his analysis of the new rankings. “Even among the truly elite MBA programs, there were double-digit changes which tend to be rare and hardly credible,” Byrne writes.

In the article he calls out some head scratchers—schools that have either skyrocketed or plummeted over last year’s standing—but Byrne says that in general, the new methodology has produced a somewhat more credible list than last year’s, “which severely damaged the standing of the Businessweek ranking.”

In the end, despite any debate over rankings and methodology, one thing remains clear: the MBA continues to be a sound investment in one’s career.

Jonathan Rodkin, research and rankings coordinator at Bloomberg Businessweek, says, “Most MBAs have no trouble landing jobs: Three months after graduation, 88 percent of MBAs have been hired—and offered a nice pay bump. Graduates saw an 81 percent jump over their median compensation before B-School. After six to eight years, pay typically increased another 64 percent to around $169,000 a year.”

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