Tag Archives: INSEAD

London Business School Tops FT’s 2016 European B-School Ranking

For the third straight year, London Business School tops the Financial Times‘s overall ranking of the best business schools in Europe, but France’s HEC Paris and INSEAD came in close on its heels. The FT publishes …

LBS tops FT European rankingsFor the third straight year, London Business School tops the Financial Times‘s overall ranking of the best business schools in Europe, but France’s HEC Paris and INSEAD came in close on its heels. The FT publishes five main rankings each year: MBA, Executive MBA, Masters in Management, and the two rankings for executive education. Only schools that take part in all five are eligible for a full score.

Given that this is a relative ranking based on the aggregated performances across five rankings, FT stresses that a good score in one or two does not automatically mean a better placing overall. London Business School performed strongly across all five rankings: its full-time MBA ranked second, and its joint EMBA program with Columbia Business School as well as its customized executive education courses both ranked in fourth place.

One of the main strengths of the LBS programs, notes the FT, is the wide range of students from different countries; more than 90% of its 2015 MBA cohort came from overseas, hailing from about 60 different countries.

In this ranking, INSEAD leads the field for full-time and EMBA programs, while the University of St Gallen in Switzerland is top for MiM. Spain’s IESE Business School and IMD of Switzerland were ranked number one for customized and open-enrollment executive education programs respectively.

2016 Top Ten Best European Business Schools

  1. London Business School
  2. HEC Paris
  3. INSEAD
  4. IE Business School
  5. University of St Gallen
  6. ESADE Business School
  7. SDA Bocconi
  8. IESE Business School
  9. IMD
  10. Rotterdam School of Management

To determine this composite ranking, the Financial Times compiles a significant amount of data from the participating business schools, including average salaries, the increase in salary its graduates receive three years after completing their degree, and the percentage of graduates employed three months after finishing school.

You can read the complete methodology for the FT’s European composite ranking here.

You may also be interested in:

Why US Applicants Should Consider MBA Programs Abroad

Study Abroad: Key to Competing in the International Economy

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Ask the AdCom: Opportunities to Study Abroad

Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we …

Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we know our readers will enjoy seeing  a different side of what makes these guys tick.

This fun space is not really about the application process but more about real-life topics, like what’s a good book to readbest place to study, where you can find a killer meal near campus, and all the fun stuff happening at b-school that creates those lifelong, cherished memories for MBA students.

We hope you become inspired, too!

MBA study abroad options

Today’s Question is: What study abroad options can MBA program students explore?

Alex Lawrence, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions at UCLA Anderson School of Management, points to The Global Immersion Program includes classes at UCLA Anderson and one week immersion in-country for a blend of classroom lectures, guest speakers, panel discussions, company visits and cultural activities.

Morgan Bernstein, Executive Director of Full-Time MBA Admissions  at Berkeley-Haas School of Business, says: Berkeley MBA students may embark on an international exchange program in the fall semester of their second year. International exchange programs are offered at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, IESE Business School, Universidad de Navarra, Barcelona, L’Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales (HEC), Jouy-en-Josas, and London Business School.

Students can also do an exchange with Columbia Business School in New York. Students interested in international exposure without the semester exchange often participate in International Business Development (IBD), our global consulting course that sends student teams all over the world to complete a three-week consulting project.

Judi Byers, Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid  at Cornell’s Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management, asked students to share their experience with Johnson’s study abroad options:

  • Sydney Chernish, MBA ’16: We have programs where students can attend schools across the world. For shorter periods, there are opportunities to attend two week international treks to receive elective credit.
  • Najeen Riazi, MBA ’17: There is incredible diversity of study abroad programs.  I participated in programs in South Africa/Zanzibar and Israel and both were life-changing.
  • Daniel Greenhaw, MBA ’16: Yes – either semester abroad or week long excursions known as Johnson Treks.

Virginie Fougea, Associate Director of Admissions at INSEAD, says: In addition to our three campuses (Abu Dhabi, Fontainebleau & Singapore), we have alliances and partnerships with Kellogg, Wharton, SAIS John Hopkins and CEIBS in the US and China.

Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of MBA Admissions at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business, says: We have semester exchange programs with ESADE, HEC, and BiMBA at Peking University. We also require all MBAs to complete the Global Business Experience course, which asks them to consult for a company abroad then travel to that company to present their recommendations to executives.

John Roeder, Assistant Dean Graduate Admissions  at SMU Cox School of Business, says: While we have traditional Study Abroad programs, all students will go abroad to either Asia, South America or Europe as a part of the Global Leadership Program at Cox at the end of their first year.

As one of the first leading business schools to mandate global immersion for our students, the Cox School has built deep and extensive relationships with the leaders of today’s greatest international companies. As a result, students don’t just tour countries and visit headquarter locations; you hear and learn from the C-level executives who lead their global organizations on a daily basis.

Allison Jamison, Admissions Director at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, says: In addition to our Global Academic Travel Experience (GATE) courses, where students study an area of the world for a term and then go to visit, we offer more than 30 international exchange partners from Denmark, to China, to South Africa, to Argentina, and more.

Isser Gallogly, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions at NYU Stern School of Business, says: Yes, including our popular 1-2 week in-country, intensive courses called Doing Business in… (DBis) to explore how business is conducted in other countries in Central America, South America, Europe, Africa and Asia & Pacific.

Kelly R. Wilson, Executive Director of Admissions at CMU Tepper School of Business, says: Transitional Economies Study Abroad in EU is an option for those looking for a formal exchange program. Global Treks also play a role internationally.

Melissa Fogerty, Director of Admissions at Yale School of Management, says: Global engagement is a daily occurrence at Yale SOM…Our curriculum not only incorporates global perspectives into course work and cases but also requires significant global experience and includes a unique class on working in global virtual teams.

Yale SOM was the first major MBA program to require students to study abroad, with the introduction of our International Experience trips in 2006. Students now choose from a menu of Global Studies options, which include leveraging the Global Network for Advanced Management through Global Network Weeks and Courses, semester-long study abroad, International Experience trips, and real-world consulting experience with mission-driven entrepreneurs in the Global Social Entrepreneurship elective. Students also participate in an innovative Global Virtual Teams course, in which they partnered this year with Global Network peers at EGADE Business School in Mexico and HEC Paris in France on a virtual operations management project.

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Get your passport ready, because it seems international travel is all but guaranteed when you pursue an MBA degree at one of the top b-schools anywhere in the world!  Look out for the #AskAdCom in our social media channels, and we’ll see you again next week when we check in to Ask the AdCom about the entrepreneurship resources available at their programs.

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Ask the AdCom: What’s a Popular Annual Activity?

Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we …

Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we know our readers will enjoy seeing  a different side of what makes these guys tick.

This fun space is not really about the application process but more about real-life topics, like what’s a good book to readbest place to study, where you can find a killer meal near campus, and all the fun stuff happening at b-school that creates those lifelong, cherished memories for MBA students.

We hope you become inspired, too!

Today’s question is: Tell us about a popular annual activity on campus.

MBA student lifeVirginie Fougea, Associate Director of Admissions at INSEAD, says: National Weeks. With more than 70 nationalities represented on our campuses, everyone is a minority at INSEAD. National weeks are events that set the INSEAD MBA experience apart from other business schools; it is the celebration of diversity.

Ten times a year, students from various countries showcase their cultural traditions to the class during a week-long celebration (food, traditional costumes, music, etc.). National Weeks happen simultaneously in Fontainebleau and Singapore.

Judi Byers, Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Cornell’s Johnson Graduate School of Management, asked her students to share their favorites:

  • Peter Su, MBA ’17: Spring Formal
  • Sydney Chernish, MBA ’16: Some of our most entertaining events include Diwali, a variety show put on by the South Asian Business Club. Another is the annual Charity Auction, which raises thousands of dollars for local charities and brings out donations and bids from faculty, staff, students, and partners.
  • Najeen Riazi, MBA ’17: SO MANY.  Carnivale. Holi. Slope Day and Battle of the Brands.G
  • Daniel Greenhaw, MBA ’16: Slope Day

Rodrigo Malta, Director of Admissions at UT McCombs School of Business, says: Texas MBA International NightEach year the International MBA Student Association (IMBASA) and the Texas MBA+ Leadership Program host the largest MBA event of the year, International Night.

With almost 1,000 attendees, this event gives MBAs from all over the world an opportunity to open the doors to their culture for their classmates with a night of food, dancing, traditional games and entertainment. The evening is a multicultural celebration featuring an exciting blend of representatives from more than 20 countries. The popular event gives MBAs an opportunity to take a break from their academic rigors and discover the diversity of McCombs.

Also, Texas MBA @ SXSW: Every year, McCombs hosts a booth at SXSW Interactive and our annual McCombs E-Ship Night at this great event.  This is just another way for our alumni, current students and the Austin/tech community to connect and learn more about start ups from McCombs alumni.

Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of MBA Admissions at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business, says:

  • International Student Festival – Our MBA students host an event that celebrates the many cultures found within our student body with a day of culture, dance, and food.
  • McDonough Cup – MBA cohorts compete against one another in a weeklong series of competitions, ranging from a scavenger hunt to a cookoff to sports. The winner earns their place on the coveted McDonough Cup trophy.
  • McDonough Sippy Cup – Launched last year, this event celebrates the many families with small children within our MBA program.

Morgan Bernstein, Executive Director of Full-Time MBA Admissions at UC Berkeley-Haas School of Business, says: Some of the most popular events among our students include the annual Haas Gala in San Francisco, the Haas Talent Show which showcases the musical talent of our Dean (as well as the hidden talents of our students!); and the Dean’s Scotch Tasting fundraiser, which calls on our favorite faculty and staff to guest bartend for the evening for a good cause. From an admissions perspective, we always look forward to Days at Haas, when we get to meet our newly-admitted students and their partners.

John Roeder, Assistant Dean Graduate Admissions at SMU Cox School of Business, says: Each spring, the Cox Business Leadership Center’s Nonprofit Consulting Program pairs 35 MBA students with one of four local nonprofit organizations. Student teams work over a six-week period researching and benchmarking, gathering and analyzing data, and ultimately generating plans to solve core business challenges. At the conclusion of the program, students present these plans to staff and board members at each of the organizations.

Kelly R. Wilson, Executive Director of Admissions at CMU Tepper School of Business, says: Student-lead Global Treks often provide social networking opportunities with students, local executives, alumni and faculty. Recent Global Trek regions include: China, Dubai, Japan, India, Israel, Peru, South Africa and Morocco.

Melissa Fogerty, Director of Admissions  at Yale School of Management, says:  At Yale SOM, we host an annual celebration of our community’s cultural diversity called International Week. During this week, students enjoy global food at International Food Fest, and participate in #OneSOM activities like Global Trivia, What Not to Do in a Business Setting, and Travel Etiquette.

Isser Gallogly, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions at NYU Stern School of Business, says: Each spring, Stern’s student government hosts “International Passport Day” — students share their country’s unique heritage through cuisine, costumes and performances in a festival on Gould Plaza.

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Look out for the #AskAdCom in our social media channels, and we’ll see you again next week when we check in to Ask the AdCom who are the “must meet” professors.

Image credit: Flickr user Elitatt, CC by 2.0

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Why U.S. Applicants Should Consider MBA Programs Abroad

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News. As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, tomorrow’s business professionals will need to develop an adaptive mindset that allows them to successfully navigate a …

international MBA programs

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.

As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, tomorrow’s business professionals will need to develop an adaptive mindset that allows them to successfully navigate a variety of markets, languages and cultures.

We’ve seen a lot of growth lately in the range of international full-time, part-time and executive MBA courses aimed at U.S. students looking for a global business school experience, and there’s no better way to expand your horizons than by studying in another country.

While top U.S. business schools continue to dominate many rankings, programs at global universities hold their own when it comes to prestige and quality. Of the top MBA programs in the world, there are typically high-ranking programs outside of the U.S., including the University of Navarra’s IESE Business School in Spain, the Hautes Etudes Commerciales (HEC) Paris and the University of Queensland Business School in Australia.

But what sets apart an international MBA? Student body diversity is one.

European business schools, for example, boast a roughly 80 percent non-national ratio, compared to 30 percent at their U.S. counterparts. Whether these programs include class trips to work in emerging economies or offer a cohort with students from numerous different countries, they compete on equal footing with the best North American schools.

Another attractive characteristic for U.S. students is that many of the highly ranked business programs in Europe are just one year. Though the shorter MBA program means a more grueling schedule, many feel it’s worth the trade-off because it translates into just one year of foregone salary and the possibility of students getting their educational investment back in less than three years.

You’ll always have the highest exposure to jobs in your geographic area, so keep that top of mind as you think about your career goals and fields of interest. If you already know that you want to work in Asia, Europe, the Middle East or Latin America, you’d be better off choosing a local school where you can network directly with employers.

Many international MBA programs are offered in English, though fluency in the local language greatly enhances your candidacy when applying. English-language MBA programs at IESE Business School and HEC Paris, for example, offer students a chance to strengthen their Spanish or French while learning how commerce works in the host countries.

In general, though, overseas MBA programs prefer applicants who can point to previous professional or study abroad experience, since this demonstrates that you already know how to work with different cultures and are more likely to enrich the experience of others in the cohort.

INSEAD Business School in France opened a second campus in Singapore in 2000, clearly a shift to specifically target Asia and the Pacific Rim. Asian universities in turn have stepped up their game when it comes to competing for students.

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, one of the region’s highly recognized graduate schools of business, has joined forces with China Europe International Business School in Shanghai and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore to raise their visibility in North America and Europe and interest more Western candidates to Asia to earn MBA degrees. Lower program costs and Asia’s ever-increasing economic relevance, plus the use of English as the language of instruction, makes this trio particularly appealing to students in the West.

Latin America, meanwhile, is a relatively young MBA market that offers substantial growth opportunities and an affordable management education compared to its North American counterparts. According to the most recent QS Top MBA Report on the global job market, hiring is particularly insular in Latin America, and the percentage of employers who look for talent within their own region is second only to the U.S. and Canada.

The region’s rapidly growing economy – notably in Mexico, Brazil and Peru – means increased opportunities for business and trade, and MBAs who are comfortable with the local language as well as with the region’s social and cultural norms will thrive.

Some of the schools recognized throughout the world are the EGADE Business School and IPADE Business School in Mexico, the CENTRUM Católica Business School in Peru and FGV’s São Paulo School of Business Administration in Brazil.

Whether your goal is to establish yourself ahead of U.S. candidates for international jobs or simply to have a degree that carries the cachet of regional knowledge, choosing to pursue an MBA overseas give you the opportunity for a truly transformational experience, leading to a greater understanding of yourself and how business operates around the world.

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Ask the AdCom: What’s a Can’t-Miss Course?

Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we …

Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we know our readers will enjoy seeing  a different side of what makes these guys tick.

This fun space is not really about the application process but more about real-life topics, like what’s a good book to readbest place to study, where you can find a killer meal near campus, and all the fun stuff happening at b-school that creates those lifelong, cherished memories for MBA students.

We hope you become inspired, too!

class at INSEAD

Today’s question is: Name a must-take course.

Virginie Fougea, Associate Director of Admissions at INSEAD, says:  The MBA’16 J class has just elected Pr. Henning Piezunka (teaching New Business Ventures) and Pr. Peter Joos (teaching Financial Accounting) for the “Best Teacher” awards. ‘The First Hundred Days’ is also very popular.

Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of MBA Admissions  at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business, recommends:

  • Start-Up Factory with Eric Koester
  • Understanding Entrepreneurship with Professor Jeff Reid
  • 1st-Year Core Finance with Professor Lee Pinkowitz
  • Social Enterprise with Melissa Bradley
  • Firm Analysis and Strategy with Professor Jeff Macher

Kelly R. Wilson, Executive Director of Admissions  at CMU Tepper School of Business, recommends Corporate Restructuring, taught by Dean Bob Dammon.

John Roeder, Assistant Dean Graduate Admissions  at SMU Cox School of Business, recommends Master Negotiation with Robin Pinkley.  Everyone should take a Negotiations course in their MBA as the skills and tactics are useful in business, buying a car, dealing with a spouse…Robin wrote THE book on Salary Negotiations (Get Paid What You’re Worth).  This may be why our students are so successful in their average post-MBA salaries.

Melissa Fogerty, Director of Admissions at Yale School of Management, notes: About 65% of our students at SOM take at least one elective course outside of the School of Management at other Yale schools, and the most popular non-SOM course this academic year was Renewable Energy Project Finance at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

If you are interested in sustainability and the environment, this practicum exposes students to real-world tools of the trade and the theory underlying them, exploring what one would encounter if working for a utility project developer, project finance lender or infrastructure equity investment firm.

Judi Byers, Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Cornell’s Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management, shared these student recommendations:

  • Peter Su, MBA ’17: Critical and Strategical Thinking
  • Sydney Chernish, MBA ’16: The most helpful and enjoyable class was Oral Communications. It’s a small, hands-on class where you present speeches and receive professor and peer feedback in a constructive and positive way.
  • Najeen Riazi, MBA ’17: Management Cases or Macroeconomics.
  • Daniel Greenhaw, MBA ’16: Negotiations.
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Look out for the #AskAdCom in our social media channels, and we’ll see you again next week when we check in to Ask the AdCom some fun student clubs.

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Tuesday Tips: INSEAD 2017 Intake MBA Essay Tips

INSEAD, “the business school of the world,” is a dynamic, diverse and highly international MBA option. Along with the basic MBA questions most other schools ask, INSEAD is looking for significant exploration of your career …

INSEAD mba essay tipsINSEAD, “the business school of the world,” is a dynamic, diverse and highly international MBA option. Along with the basic MBA questions most other schools ask, INSEAD is looking for significant exploration of your career goals and background. Along with career aspirations and leadership experience, an international focus is important to INSEAD.

This year INSEAD has added a required video interview component to the application process, which will be completed shortly after you submit your application. The video interview has become more common in MBA applications, and Stacy Blackman Consulting has extensive experience prepping candidates for video interviews. Contact us to learn more.

JOB DESCRIPTION ESSAYS
Job Essay 1: Briefly summarise your current (or most recent) job, including the nature of work, major responsibilities, and where relevant, employees under your supervision, size of budget, clients/products and results achieved. (short answer)

This question should focus entirely on your current (or most recent) work situation. Though you will want to provide relevant context for your current role, make sure you are devoting most of the essay to describing the details of your day-to-day responsibilities and oversight. If you are lighter on supervising others or managing a budget, you have the opportunity to highlight some key responsibilities and results.

When you are composing this essay make sure you focus on what you uniquely have contributed to the role, rather than reciting the job description. What have you done that is above and beyond?

Job Essay 2: What would be your next step in terms of position if you were to remain in the same company? (short answer)

Once you have described what you do at work currently, INSEAD asks for you to imagine what you will do in the future. Because you are ambitious enough to be applying to an MBA program like INSEAD, you are likely on a serious career track in your current company. If your boss has already talked to you about the next step this is an easy question to answer.

If you have not explicitly discussed promotion at work, what would be the next role you would ideally pursue? If you are pursuing an MBA because you want to make a career change or because the next step at your current company is undesirable for other reasons, this may be a place to describe what that next step would be and why you do not wish to pursue it (with more context provided in the long term goal section).

Job Essay 3: Please give a full description of your career since graduating from university. Describe your career path with the rationale behind your choices. (short answer)

With this essay INSEAD is seeking to understand your career trajectory and how you have grown and progressed through your career. Think about the choices you have made in your career, and how your past experiences have combined to provide you with your current skill set.

If you have a fairly straightforward career path you can take this opportunity to comment on some of the learnings from each position to create the story of your past, present and future plans.

Job Essay 4: Discuss your short and long term career aspirations with or without an MBA from INSEAD. (short answer)

Since you have covered your current role at work, your hypothetical next step at your company and how you arrived at this place, now you can bring the story together to explain what you are pursuing an MBA from INSEAD.

While the best candidates for an MBA might be able to succeed without one, typically a top tier MBA like INSEAD is an accelerator for your career – introducing you to a broader network than you would otherwise have, expanding your skillset into new functional areas and exposing you to people from around the world.

Think about how you plan to use your MBA to accelerate your career (or change paths entirely). If you did not attend INSEAD, how would you achieve your goals otherwise? Think of this essay as a thought experiment to show that you can plan two routes to one goal, while perhaps demonstrating the superiority of the MBA path.

Optional: If you are currently not working or if you plan to leave your current employer more than 2 months before the programme starts, please explain your activities and occupations between leaving your job and the start of the programme.

If you are not employed at the moment, you will want to answer this question to show how you are utilizing your time without full time employment. Ideally you are currently involved in an activity that is going to further your career or personal goals at this time. The best answer is one that shows you are self-motivated and do not need paid work to continue developing yourself.

For example, perhaps you are volunteering in a non-profit that is related to your career goals. Maybe you are working with a friend on a start-up. Or you are consulting and building contacts in your industry.

If you are out of work only briefly, it’s also perfectly reasonable to be pursuing travel or other activities that develop your international awareness and perspective. However, make sure that your activities can tie back to your long-term goals or other key aspects of your application strategy.

MOTIVATION ESSAYS
Motivation Essay 1: Give a candid description of yourself (who are you as a person), stressing the personal characteristics you feel to be your strengths and weaknesses and the main factors which have influenced your personal development, giving examples when necessary (approximately 500 words).

Strengths and weaknesses are a common topic for MBA applications and seek to understand your level of maturity and self-awareness. This is a great opportunity to highlight some of your skills and attributes that demonstrate leadership, teamwork or other qualities that will drive your future career success.

Examples aren’t explicitly required, but consider that the admissions committee is reading a vast number of essays and concrete examples are both easy to understand and can help you stand out.

When describing weaknesses you will want to focus on those weaknesses that you have taken concrete steps to address, or that have been a route to learning more about yourself. Often strengths and weaknesses are two sides of the same coin, in which case you can even tie your key weaknesses to your key strengths.

Because it is often difficult to write about one’s weaknesses this is an especially important essay to share with others to seek feedback on tone and impact.

Motivation Essay 2: Describe the achievement of which you are most proud and explain why. In addition, describe a situation where you failed. How did these experiences impact your relationships with others? Comment on what you learned (approximately 400 words).

This essay is an opportunity to showcase one of your most important achievements. Impressive achievements that stand on their own are great, but you will want to pay equal attention to explaining why these accomplishments are valuable to you. If you concisely explain the accomplishment and how you were able to bring it to fruition, you will have room to provide the context for your personal pride in the accomplishment.

If you don’t have an achievement that you think is incredibly impressive on its face, consider an example that demonstrates the activities you value. Remember, not everyone has sold a company or won an Olympic medal prior to business school!

The flip side of achievement is failure, and INSEAD wants to understand how you view both. When approaching any failure essay it’s important to use a real failure that has emotional resonance for you. An accomplishment framed as a failure will be easy to see through and will not demonstrate anything about your maturity or ability to grow.

Your failure should be real, and also something that led you to grow or learn. If you can describe how you have changed your approach as a result of the failure that is an excellent outcome.

The third part of the essay deals with how these experiences impacted the others around you and what you learned. Whether you were part of a team or the main impact was on a loved one, this part of the essay encourages you to step outside your own narrative of success and failure and think about how you have impacted other people through your actions.

Most obviously a success led to happiness from a team or a manager, while a failure was disappointing to those around you. However, your particular achievement or failure could have led to a learning experience for your team, an opportunity for someone else, or a chance for you to be closer to another person through a team challenge. Think creatively about this aspect.

Note that your application to INSEAD ideally covers both the personal and professional. This essay could be an opportunity in this essay set to bring in a new angle on your profile through describing one of your most substantial accomplishments outside of work.

Motivation Essay 3: Describe all types of extra-professional activities in which you have been or are still involved for a significant amount of time (clubs, sports, music, arts, politics, etc). How are you enriched by these activities? (approximately 300 words)

Nothing is more personal than what you choose to do outside of school or work. What are the most meaningful pursuits you have spent your time on? You should both describe the main interests you have outside of your professional pursuits and explain why they are meaningful to you and why you spend time on them.

Ideally you can also explain how you will continue your involvement while at INSEAD and cite some specific clubs or groups where you see your interests contributing to the community.

Optional Motivation Essay: Is there anything else that was not covered in your application that you would like to share with the Admissions Committee? (approximately 300 words)

This essay is 300 words you can use for anything you would like to showcase and that you were unable to work into the rest of your application. Because INSEAD’s questions are quite thorough you may have covered all aspects of your candidacy and personal qualities in the other five essay questions, in which case you can feel comfortable skipping this question (it IS optional). If you did not have a place for an interesting hobby, new aspect of your background to describe, or key accomplishment, it may be appropriate to use this space to tell that story.

It is far better to fully explain any issues in your application than to leave the admissions committee to guess what happened. If you have any challenging aspects to your candidacy like a low GPA or a failing grade in college, this is the correct place to address those concerns. Explain your issue clearly and focus most of the essay on the correction for the issue.

For example, if you had a disciplinary issue in college, spend most of the essay demonstrating that you learned from the experience and have been an ideal citizen ever since rather than focusing on the negative. Avoid blaming anyone else for your issue, and relentlessly show why this one incident is in your past and will stay there.

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