Tag Archives: Kellogg School of Management

B-School Profs Offer Strategies for the Networking-Averse

Everyone knows that a huge part of the b-school experience is creating a network that you’ll be tapping into for the rest of your career. But what if you’re naturally shy, or simply hate the …

Shy guy

Everyone knows that a huge part of the b-school experience is creating a network that you’ll be tapping into for the rest of your career. But what if you’re naturally shy, or simply hate the idea of networking because it makes you feel phony, opportunistic, or just plain “dirty”?

The majority of international students at U.S. MBA programs come from Asia, where the cultural differences related to networking are stark. Even European students often find it awkward to send introductory emails or chat up strangers at networking events. Career centers in turn worry these cultural differences put international students at a disadvantage during their internship and job searches.

In the May issue of Harvard Business Review, professors Tiziana Casciaro of the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, Francesca Gino of Harvard Business School, and Marvam Kouchaki of Kellogg School of Management share strategies for making networking not only more bearable, but perhaps even enjoyable for the networking-averse among us.

The quickest way to flip the switch in your negative mindset about networking? Stop making it about you.

For example, at a networking event, take the focus off of yourself and instead focus on the other people at the event. The researchers discovered that when people focus on how they can help others — instead of how others can help them — the act of networking suddenly takes on a different tone.

“When you think more about what you can give to others than what you can get from them,” they write, “networking will seem less self-promotional and more selfless — and therefore more worthy of your time.”

The professors offer other strategies to help recast networking in a more positive light, including how you can make the focus about learning, identify common interests, or assign a higher purpose to the practice. Take a look at the original article on Harvard Business Review and see if their tips alleviate some of the discomfort you’ve been feeling up til now.

You may also be interested in:

Use Your Network to help You Get Into Business School
3 Ways to Get a Head Start When Building Your B-School Network

Image credit: Amir Kurbanov (CC BY-SA 2.0)

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Who Scored Big in Kellogg’s Super Bowl Ad Review?

Half of U.S. homes with televisions tuned in for Super Bowl 50 on Sunday, so it’s no wonder advertisers willingly pay millions per minute to grab those viewers’ attention. Two marketing professors at Northwestern University’s …

kellogg school

Half of U.S. homes with televisions tuned in for Super Bowl 50 on Sunday, so it’s no wonder advertisers willingly pay millions per minute to grab those viewers’ attention.

Two marketing professors at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management think businesses can learn a lot from which ads resonate with the audience, and for the past twelve years have been leading a panel of MBA students who grade the spots on their effectiveness in real time during the Kellogg School Super Bowl Advertising Review.

This Review uses a strategic academic framework known as ADPLAN to evaluate the effectiveness of Super Bowl spots in building the advertiser’s brand. The acronym instructs viewers to grade ads based on:

Attention: Does the ad engage the audience?

Distinction: Is the execution unique in delivery?

Positioning: Is the appropriate category represented and a strong benefit featured?

Linkage: Will the brand and benefit be remembered?

Amplification: Are viewers’ thoughts favorable?

Net equity: Is the ad consistent with the brand’s history and reputation?

“Toyota’s Prius was a clear winner in this year’s Super Bowl because it kept our attention, had strong linkage to the brand and showcased its benefits,” said Derek D. Rucker, Sandy & Morton Goldman Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies in Marketing, of the spot with the four elusive bank robbers titled “The Longest Chase.”

Other brands that earned top marks include Budweiser, T-Mobile, Doritos, Audi and TurboTax.  Squarespace, LG and Acura received low grades for less effective ads.

“While many advertisers played it safe, our panel found most of the overall advertising worked well with strong branding and many companies communicated a clear point of difference,” said Tim Calkins, Clinical Professor of Marketing, who also leads the Review.

“On the other hand, Squarespace ranked at the bottom of our Ad Review for the second year in a row. This is not a surprise as our panel found it both confusing and lacking a clear point of difference,” he added.

Many advertisers included humor or upbeat themes, with only a few exceptions, including Colgate, SunTrust and Audi.

Courtney Firestone, one of the 69 Kellogg MBA students who participated in the Ad Review panel, said, “As a student, getting to participate in Kellogg’s Super Bowl Ad Review was a great experience to apply what we’ve learned in class.”

A full list of the rankings is available here.

Image credit: Kellogg School of Management

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Stacy Blackman’s Words of Wisdom Campaign Heats Up

We’re wrapping up the third week of the Words of Wisdom (WOW) campaign on our social media streams, and the online response has been nothing short of incredible! Have you checked it out yet?  The …

motivation for MBA applicants

We’re wrapping up the third week of the Words of Wisdom (WOW) campaign on our social media streams, and the online response has been nothing short of incredible! Have you checked it out yet?  The goal is to motivate potential MBA candidates with inspirational quotes from the top business schools and our educational partners.

More than 12 elite MBA programs, and organizations such as Forté Foundation and the MBA Tour, have chimed in with their thoughts on reapplying, reminders about how to take advantage of every opportunity, reality checks regarding the GMAT, and views on how to create value and sense of purpose in all that you do.

Every Friday during the campaign, we’ll provide a roundup of these motivational messages here on the blog, but you can see them right away on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram. Use the following hashtags:  #WOW #WordsofWisdom #SBCWOW #MBAinspiration and #BeInspired to check it out each day.

We hope these messages inspire you to make 2016 your best year ever!

  • “Approximately 15 percent of Tuck applicants are reapplicants. We look favorably upon reapplicants and work closely with them. If Tuck remains your top choice, reach out to us to help you determine if and what reapplicant strategy might work best for you,” says Dawna Clarke, Director of Admissions at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth.
  • “Training yourself to be sure of the outcome of the GMAT, to imagine conquering business school and even looking ahead to your future career will help you create a game plan for success,” advises Bara Sapir, CEO/Founder of Test Prep New York/Test Prep San Francisco.
  • Kellogg School of Management Professor David Chen counsels MBA students to “Figure out how your values can create value.”
  • “Students ask me how to find their purpose.  My advice is simple: stop looking for a purpose and start noticing when you get excited by what you are doing.  When you enjoy your work, your purpose usually finds you,” says Professor Richard Shell at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.
  • “Don’t put too much emphasis on the GMAT. People overemphasize the GMAT because it’s the most “concrete” element of the application. It’s easy to understand that a higher score means a somewhat higher change of being accepted. However, the real difference between a 710 and even a 740, or a 650 and a 690, is probably way smaller than you think.  In a way, it’s “easy” to put your head down and focus on improving your GMAT score for two hours. But it’s “hard” to figure out which schools are really a great fit for you, your core reasons for going to business school, and your personal narrative around what you’d bring to a program. Once you get the GMAT score that falls in the range of your target schools, move on and focus on the application,” advises My Guru‘s Mark Skoskiewicz.
  • Amanda Soule Shaw, Assistant Dean for Student Services at Cornell’s Johnson School of Management, says, “Commit to doing new things and expanding your network of contacts. It’s great to be completely sure of your post-MBA goal, but don’t let that goal define the choices you make in terms of classes, clubs, teams and friends. Your time in school will provide limitless opportunities to gain exposure to diverse topics and perspectives, so make sure to take full advantage of that once in a lifetime experience.”
  • “We all make mistakes. The key is to learn from your mistakes so you don’t repeat them.” GMAT Genius
  • “Embrace the transformative opportunity that an MBA program offers.  The network is invaluable, but maximizing its value first requires openness to change and effort to develop who you are and what you can do,” says Professor Scott B. Smart at Indiana University Kelley School of Business 
  • Professor Harry Kraemer at the Kellogg School of Management advises, “Don’t forget to take the time to self-reflect and ask yourself, ‘What are my values? What really matters?'”

You may also be interested in:

Stacy Blackman’s Words of Wisdom Campaign Continues
Stacy Blackman’s Words of Wisdom Campaign

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Stacy Blackman’s Words of Wisdom Campaign

Earlier this week, we launched a Words of Wisdom (WOW) campaign on our social media streams. Have you seen it yet?  The goal is to galvanize potential MBA candidates with inspirational quotes from the top …

Words of Wisdom campaign

Earlier this week, we launched a Words of Wisdom (WOW) campaign on our social media streams. Have you seen it yet?  The goal is to galvanize potential MBA candidates with inspirational quotes from the top business schools and our educational partners, and we’ve had a tremendous response!

More than 12 elite MBA programs, and organizations such as Forté Foundation and the MBA Tour, will chime in with their thoughts on topics such as how to conquer the GMAT, solve the thorniest business problems, manage your time, and be true to your values.

Every Friday for the next month, we’ll provide a roundup of these motivational messages here on the blog, but you can see them right away on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram. Use the following hashtags:  #WOW #WordsofWisdom #SBCWOW #MBAinspiration and #BeInspired to check it out each day.

We hope these messages inspire you to make 2016 your best year ever!

“We all live by a set of core principles. Make sure that one of yours is to choose graciousness in all that you do.” Mike Rielly,  Assistant Dean, The Berkeley MBA For Executives, UC Berkeley Haas School of Business

“Your best preparation includes learning how to fully engage in your own learning process.” Bara Sapir, CEO/Founder  of  Test Prep NY/SF

“What is happiness? Three things: good health, meaningful work, and love.” Richard Shell, Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics  at The Wharton School. Author of numerous books including Springboard: Launching Your Personal Search for Success

 “Research tells us that women tend to opt out of opportunities where they do not feel 100% qualified. The truth is that there is no one ideal MBA candidate profile.  There’s also no one ideal business school. Opt yourself in to this process. Explore a variety of schools, and find which one is the ideal fit for YOU.” Krystal Brooks, Associate Director, Early Career Women at Forté Foundation

“Be a force for intellectual honesty in public discourse — be true to your values, respect the differing values of others, and be willing to change your views in the face of new analysis and evidence.”Professor David Besanko, Kellogg School of Management

“The GMAT is like a first date: first impressions matter, but you must be on the top of your game throughout the entire time.” The Economist Test Prep

“When solving problems, it’s easy to come at them and say ‘I need to fix this.’ Instead, take the time to question the problem itself.” Christina Hachikian, Executive Director, Social Enterprise Initiative, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Strategy, The University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

“Time management is key. Start the application process early, and make sure to plan ahead for any unforeseen delays.” The MBA Tour  

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7 Podcasts to Feed Your Mind This Thanksgiving Weekend

When you finally emerge from your Tryptophan coma this Thanksgiving weekend and have a hankering for some food for thought, check out these illuminating B-school podcasts that cover entrepreneurship, creativity, leadership and marketing tactics. Professor …

When you finally emerge from your Tryptophan coma this Thanksgiving weekend and have a hankering for some food for thought, check out these illuminating B-school podcasts that cover entrepreneurship, creativity, leadership and marketing tactics.

MBA podcasts

Professor Dorie Clark at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business talks about what it takes to succeed in business today. Whether you’re an entrepreneur or an employee, it’s all about standing out.

From the online publication Kellogg Insight, October’s faculty podcast features two Kellogg School of Management professors and a lecturer about the power of storytelling, as well as their tips to become a better storyteller.

Wendy Huber, Assistant Dean for the Full-Time MBA Program at Darden School of Business offers tips on how to achieve success in business school.

Harvard Business School launched a podcast series this fall called Cold Call, and the episode “Dangerous Mines: Saving Lives Through Leadership” stresses safety in South Africa’s platinum mines.

Brit Morin, founder and CEO of Brit + Co, discusses Inspiring Creativity with Great Content in this podcast from Entrepreneurial Thought Corner at Stanford University.

Nicholas Epley, professor of behavioral science at Chicago Booth School of Business, debunks some dangerous myths about gender differences.

This one falls under the marketing category, but it’s also just really fun and interesting for anyone headed to see “Spectre” this weekend. The Wharton School‘s Knowledge@Wharton publication offers this new podcast: The Spy Whom We Loved: The Enduring Appeal of James Bond.

We hope you enjoy this little bit of brain food and find something useful—and interesting—in each of these suggestions.

Image credit: Flickr user Patrick Breitenbach (CC By 2.0)

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