Tag Archives: Kellogg School of Management

Advice for Incoming MBA Students

If you’re headed to business school in the fall, your brain is probably near melting with an information overload right about now. We’re going to add just one thing more to your overflowing plate, though …

always learningIf you’re headed to business school in the fall, your brain is probably near melting with an information overload right about now. We’re going to add just one thing more to your overflowing plate, though you’ll probably find this next bit quite useful.

The admissions blog at Kellogg School of Management has a regular columnist this year in first-year student Rohan Rajiv, who blogs once a week about important lessons he is learning at Kellogg. His most recent entry, written as a letter to an incoming MBA student, covers all the basics of what to expect at business school, but then he takes a deep dive into how to “frame” the MBA experience.

The post covers three principles:

  • the MBA is a two-year course in decision making and tradeoffs;
  • the experience is entirely what you make of it;
  • foolishness is believing your value multiplied by 10 just because you spent two years running around a university campus.

“The MBA journey is the first step to the next phase of your life journey,” Rajiv writes. “The lessons from this post aren’t just about doing well in graduate school. I think the principles apply for life after school.”

Fair warning, his post is long. But it does provide ample food for thought and may serve as an important reality check for the newest members of the MBA Class of 2017.

You may also be interested in:

Checklist for Admitted MBA Students

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Study Abroad: Key to Competing in the International Economy

How important are travel and education experiences abroad to achieving success in the global economy? That’s almost a trick question, since the answer is a resounding v-e-r-y. The ability to work well internationally with people …

How important are travel and education experiences abroad to achieving success in the global economy? That’s almost a trick question, since the answer is a resounding v-e-r-y. The ability to work well internationally with people and cultures other than your own has never been more critical than it is today, and one of the best stepping stones to cross-cultural competence is studying abroad.

study abroad

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Wharton Magazine has published a fascinating article highlighting the recent White House Summit on Study Abroad and Global Citizenship. During that event, First Lady Michelle Obama said studying abroad is “quickly becoming the key to success in our global economy. Getting ahead in today’s workplace isn’t [just] about getting good grades … but about having real experience with the world beyond your borders. Study abroad is about shaping the future of your country and of the world we all share.”

Several travel bloggers and digital media influencers were invited to the event. One such guest, the publisher of WanderingEducators.com Jessie Voigts, says, “Study abroad and gaining international experience are critical to citizens of the world today. In order to compete in the international economy, we need to have an educated, well-traveled, resilient population.”

We’ve covered the subject of studying abroad in the past, and of particular interest were the research findings of Kellogg School of Management Professor Adam Galinsky, who suggested that living abroad boosts creativity.  Together with the study’s lead author William Maddux, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at INSEAD, they conducted five studies to test the idea that living abroad and creativity are linked.

The results showed that the longer students had spent living abroad, the more likely they were to come up with more creative solutions to problems. “Knowing that experiences abroad are critical for creative output makes study abroad programs and job assignments in other countries that much more important, especially for people and companies that put a premium on creativity and innovation to stay competitive,” Maddux wrote. 

Take a look at Lisa Ellen Niver‘s piece, “Make Study Abroad an Education Imperative,” for further thoughts on how international education experiences will help Americans keep pace with other countries in global marketplace.

You may also be interested in:

Living Abroad Boosts Creativity, Say INSEAD & Kellogg Profs

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Wharton’s Social Impact Initiative Welcomes New Senior Fellow

Jonathan Greenblatt, founder of Ethos Water and currently Special Assistant to the President and Director of the White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation, will serve as a Senior Fellow at University of …

Jonathan Greenblatt, founder of Ethos Water and currently Special Assistant to the President and Director of the White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation, will serve as a Senior Fellow at University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School starting in January, the school announced late last week. 

A serial social entrepreneur, Greenblatt is considered one of the leading experts in the country on social innovation and shared value. Ethos Water, the premium bottled water that helps children around the world get clean water, was  acquired by Starbucks Coffee in 2005.

While working with the Wharton Social Impact Initiative, Greenblatt is expected to lecture on a number of topics for the remainder of the 2014-2015 academic year, including impact investing, shared value, social entrepreneurship, cross-sector leadership, and nonprofit management and strategy.

Last month, Greenblatt was named as the new national director of the Anti-Defamation League, where his service will begin in July 2015.

“We are delighted to welcome Jonathan to Wharton,” says Geoffrey Garrett, Dean of the Wharton School.  “He brings a unique perspective on innovation and leadership, enriched by a rare combination of experiences at the highest level of government, business and the nonprofit world.  We are excited to have him on campus to work with our students and faculty.”

Jonathon was a classmate and friend of mine at Kellogg School of Management, so I’d also like to extend my personal congratulations to him for this latest recognition his important work has received.

 

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How Does Kellogg Assess MBA Applicants?

MBA hopefuls are always looking for clues as to how the admissions process works. With that in mind, Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management has attempted to demystify the applicant assessment process with a series …

MBA hopefuls are always looking for clues as to how the admissions process works. With that in mind, Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management has attempted to demystify the applicant assessment process with a series of blog posts this week.

Beth Tidmarsh, director of admissions for full-time MBA programs at Kellogg, addresses three key areas in this series: intellectual ability, work experience, and professional goals. While this information is tailored for a specific group of applicants, we believe the guidance holds true no matter where you’re applying.

Kellogg is looking for candidates who have demonstrated academic excellence. While your GMAT or GRE scores are key indicators that you can handle the work, the admissions team also wants to see what you’ve done to broaden your knowledge base and challenge yourself academically.

“If your scores or grades seem a little lopsided, we dig deeper into your application to look for evidence that you’ve taken steps to develop those skills,” says Tidmarsh. “That tells us if you’ve taken charge of balancing out your skill set.”

When in doubt, err on the side of explaining any dips or gaps in your academic record. You never want the admissions team speculating about your past performance.

Tidmarsh’s comments about work experience are particularly enlightening, and perhaps reassuring as well for some candidates. The director explains that applicants are analyzed within the context of their own career paths—not compared against each other.

Use your application to show how your work experience is noteworthy. If you’ve taken on more responsibilities, been promoted more quickly, and generally progressed faster than others at your same level, this is the kind of information the admissions officers want to hear, says Tidmarsh.

We really like her tip to help applicants avoid the trap of using too much industry-specific jargon.

“Think about how you would explain your job to a 10-year-old or your grandmother…This is a great place to show us how you can communicate ideas across fields and disciplines.”

Because the admissions team already has a copy of your resume, use the opportunities within the application to further explain your responsibilities and provide rich detail about your career to date. Don’t just copy your resume into the input fields, Tidmarsh admonishes.

Finally, it’s important to have a pretty clear picture of your career goals and how a Kellogg MBA will help you reach them. That’s not to say you can’t change your mind once you’re on campus. Students often explore new paths while in business school, and may decide to pursue a new direction after experiencing all that an MBA program has to offer.

“Our Admissions officers are checking to make sure you’ve got a plan in mind. We understand the plan may change over time, but do think about what areas and opportunities you would focus on if you were starting our program today,” Tidmarsh advises.

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What’s New at Kellogg School of Management

This fall has been a busy and energizing time thus far at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management, so I thought I’d share just a few of the highlights here on the blog. In early October, …

school-kellogg

This fall has been a busy and energizing time thus far at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management, so I thought I’d share just a few of the highlights here on the blog.

In early October, my alma mater hosted the 2014 Kellogg Marketing Leadership Summit, an invitation-only event that brought together more than 100 prominent senior executives, Kellogg faculty, and thought leaders at McKinsey & Company and Egon Zehnder to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing chief marketing officers at companies such as McDonalds, Target and many others.

During that same time, President Barack Obama visited Northwestern’s campus to speak about the economy with Kellogg students. “There is a reason why I came to a business school instead of a school of government,” Obama told the gathering. “I actually believe capitalism is the greatest force for prosperity and opportunity that the world has ever known.”

Kellogg also announced the expansion of its newest degree track, the Russell Fellows Program’s M.S. in Management Studies (MSMS), by opening admissions for July 2015 enrollment to accredited schools outside of Northwestern.

Kellogg is the first top-tier business school to develop a master’s program of this kind in response to strong demand. Designed to help recent graduates launch their careers, the program focuses on teaching foundational management skills and offers access to a dedicated career coach.

Finally, with $58 million in new gifts, Kellogg is celebrating a banner fundraising year for the Transforming Together campaign.This brings the total raised to-date to $225 million, and has propelled the school ever closer to its $350 million goal.

There’s tons of exciting things happening at Kellogg School of Management, so I invite you to read more about these recent events by following the links above.

You may also be interested in:

A Strategy of Inspired Growth at Kellogg

Northwestern Kellogg MBA Essay Tips

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How to Stay Sane During B-School

By now, you’ve either fantasized about how hectic yet amazing business school life is,  or you’re living it right now. Rohan Rajiv, a first-year student in Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management‘s two-year MBA program, …

By now, you’ve either fantasized about how hectic yet amazing business school life is,  or you’re living it right now. Rohan Rajiv, a first-year student in Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management‘s two-year MBA program, has written a thoughtful blog post on how to prioritize your experiences—and it begins with putting yourself above all else.

While he started the program fully aware of the many interesting academic things he would learn throughout his time at Kellogg, Rajiv says he didn’t expect he would have to learn about such things as decision-making and trade-offs, both of which guide the daily experience at business school.

The challenge of competing priorities—academics, career planning, extra-curriculars, social, family, ourselves—can sap all your energy until you learn to rank them in order of importance. Rajiv shares three core ideas he’s learned about maintaining balance so far:

Make decisions easy for yourself by being crystal clear about your core priorities.
“If you aren’t clear about the relative importance of your core priorities, you are going to drain your energy every day just thinking about these decisions. Once you get clear on your own priorities, decisions get much easier.”

Pre-decide your days and weeks as far as possible.
“Most of the time you have enough information to plan in advance. There’s a high return-on-investment on being brutally organized. Pre-decide by blocking off your time for the week based on your priorities. If you don’t prioritize exercise and sleep, other things will get in the way. Be proactive to drive your own agenda. Or someone else will.”

Make time to reflect.
“The busier things are, the more you need time to reflect. Learning-by-doing is incredibly inefficient if you don’t have enough time to take stock. Again, the return-on-investment on a little reflection time is incredibly high.”

The competing priorities never go away, Rajiv acknowledges, but figuring out the best way for you to get a handle on it will make all the difference in your enjoyment level throughout your MBA experience.

You may also be interested in:

10 Ways to Make the Most of Your B-School Experience

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