Tag Archives: Kellogg School of Management

Harvard Crowned No. 1 in Bloomberg Businessweek 2015 MBA Ranking

Bloomberg Businessweek has released its 2015 global rankings of best business schools, and Harvard Business School claims the number one spot among 74 full-time U.S. programs. Chicago Booth School of Business is number two, and …

 Harvard Business School ranked number 1Bloomberg Businessweek has released its 2015 global rankings of best business schools, and Harvard Business School claims the number one spot among 74 full-time U.S. programs. Chicago Booth School of Business is number two, and Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management is number three. Bloomberg Businessweek‘s top school of 2014, Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, fell to number eight.

Of 29 international MBA programs, Western University’s Ivey Business School in Ontario, Canada is number one (retaining its top spot in 2014’s ranking), London Business School is number two and INSEAD in Fontainebleau, France is number three.

Among the 74 part-time U.S. MBA programs evaluated, Northwestern’s Kellogg ranks number one, Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business ranks number two, and Rice University’s Jones Graduate School of Business ranks number three.

Top Ten Full-Time MBA Programs in 2015

  1. Harvard Business School
  2. Chicago Booth School of Business
  3. Kellogg School of Management
  4. MIT Sloan School of Management
  5. UPenn Wharton School
  6. Columbia Business School
  7. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  8. Duke/Fuqua School of Business
  9. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  10. Michigan Ross School of Business

For the first time, Bloomberg Businessweek says it has placed a sharper focus on what people most hope to find after business school—career growth and job satisfaction—and how well MBA programs promote both. Businessweek compiled what it calls its deepest and broadest set of data ever from over 13,150 current students, 18,540 alumni, and 1,460 recruiters across 177 business school programs.

According to the news magazine, the rankings are based on five measures:

1. Employer Survey (35 percent of total score): Recruiter feedback on the skills they look for in MBAs, and which programs best equip their students with those skills;

2. Alumni Survey (30 percent of total score): Feedback from the Classes of 2007, 2008, and 2009 on how their MBAs have affected their careers, their compensation change over time, and their mid-career job satisfaction;

3. Student Survey (15 percent of total score): The Class of 2015’s take on academics, career services, campus climate, and more;

4. Job Placement Rate (10 percent of total score): The most recent data on how many MBAs seeking full-time jobs get them within three months of graduation;

5. Starting Salary (10 percent of total score): The most recent data on how much MBAs make in their first jobs after graduation, adjusted for industry and regional variation.

“By refining our focus and updating our methodology, we’ve created the most effective ranking yet for helping career-oriented students choose an MBA program,” says Ellen Pollock, editor, Bloomberg Businessweek.

Not everyone agrees, however, that the updated methodology accurately reflects the standing of the best business schools in the land.

“Changes in methodology…result in vast swings in rankings that have nothing to do with the quality of an MBA program’s experience,” notes Poets & Quants editor John A. Byrne in his analysis of the new rankings. “Even among the truly elite MBA programs, there were double-digit changes which tend to be rare and hardly credible,” Byrne writes.

In the article he calls out some head scratchers—schools that have either skyrocketed or plummeted over last year’s standing—but Byrne says that in general, the new methodology has produced a somewhat more credible list than last year’s, “which severely damaged the standing of the Businessweek ranking.”

In the end, despite any debate over rankings and methodology, one thing remains clear: the MBA continues to be a sound investment in one’s career.

Jonathan Rodkin, research and rankings coordinator at Bloomberg Businessweek, says, “Most MBAs have no trouble landing jobs: Three months after graduation, 88 percent of MBAs have been hired—and offered a nice pay bump. Graduates saw an 81 percent jump over their median compensation before B-School. After six to eight years, pay typically increased another 64 percent to around $169,000 a year.”

You may also be interested in:

Chicago Booth Tops the Economist MBA Rankings Again
Columbia’s Dean Hubbard on MBA Rankings
Rethinking MBA Rankings

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Aspen Institute Lauds 2015 B-School Faculty Pioneers

Four professors who are leading the way in prompting business school students to think about how firms can act in the face of growing economic inequality have been named winners of this year’s Aspen Faculty …

Aspen Institute awards

Four professors who are leading the way in prompting business school students to think about how firms can act in the face of growing economic inequality have been named winners of this year’s Aspen Faculty Pioneer Awards. The honorees, announced this week by the Aspen Institute Business and Society Program, are:

  • David Besanko, IBM Professor of Regulation and Competitive Practices at the Kellogg School of Management.
  • Shawn Cole, John G. McLean Professor of Business Administration in the Finance Unit at the Harvard Business School.
  • Dima Jamali, Kamal Shair Chair in Responsible Leadership and Professor at the Olayan School of Business at the American University of Beirut.
  • Thomas Kochan, George M. Bunker Professor of Work and Employment Relations at the MIT Sloan School of Management; and Co-Director of the Institute for Work and Employment Research at MIT.

The Faculty Pioneer Awards were established in 1999 to celebrate educators who demonstrate leadership and risk-taking — and blaze a trail toward curriculum that deeply examines the relationships between capital markets, firms, and the public good.

The focus of this year’s call for nominations was to recognize and honor faculty who are teaching about inequality in their MBA classrooms, says Claire Preisser, who manages the Faculty Pioneer selection process as associate director of the Aspen Institute Business & Society Program.

“When thinking about remedies to inequality, people naturally reach into the policy sphere for solutions,” Preisser explains. “Policy interventions are very important, but historically business has been a key actor in building and sustaining a middle class. We believe that today’s business students need to be prompted more often to think about how the everyday choices in firms can build shared prosperity—or work against it. The faculty members we honor this year are doing just that.”

The fact that some faculty at top-ranked MBA programs are addressing inequality in the classroom is especially encouraging, says Judith Samuelson, executive director of the Aspen Institute Business & Society Program.

“We are very encouraged that these classroom discussions are happening, and happening at top-ranked schools—and are eager to see more faculty follow suit,” Samuelson says. “This year’s Faculty Pioneers are bringing inequality out of the ethics classroom and into the classes that really matter in the MBA curriculum.”

The Aspen Institute Business & Society Program will recognize the Faculty Pioneer Award Winners at Business and Inequality: A Dialogue on Business and Business Education in New York on Thursday, October 15. The event will focus on how business schools can most effectively prepare students to lead companies in ways that produce a vibrant economy that works for all.

You may also be interested in:

Interested in Sustainability? The Top 16 Green MBA Programs

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Stanford GSB Tops Forbes ROI Ranking…Again

Last week, Forbes released its 2015 ranking of the best business schools in the United States based on the return on investment (ROI) of the MBA Class of 2010 grads. For the second straight time, …

Stanford tops Forbes rankingLast week, Forbes released its 2015 ranking of the best business schools in the United States based on the return on investment (ROI) of the MBA Class of 2010 grads. For the second straight time, Stanford Graduate School of Business nudged out Harvard Business School for the top spot with a five-year gain of $89,100 for graduates. In fact, according to the report, the class of 2010 tripled their pre-MBA total compensation to $255,000 five years out of school.

Here’s a snapshot of the Top Ten Business Schools as crowned by Forbes:

  1. Stanford Graduate School of Business (five-year MBA gain of $89,100)
  2. Harvard Business School (five-year MBA gain of $83,500)
  3. Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management (five-year MBA gain of $72,700)
  4. Columbia Business School (five-year MBA gain of $71,100)
  5. Dartmouth Tuck School of Business (five-year MBA gain of $68,400)
  6. Chicago Booth School of Business (five-year MBA gain of $65,000)
  7. The Wharton School (five-year MBA gain of $64,900)
  8. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business (five-year MBA gain of $64,200)
  9. MIT Sloan School of Management (five-year MBA gain of $63,800)
  10. Cornell Johnson School of Management (five-year MBA gain of $63,500)

The MBA Class of 2010 had it pretty tough, graduating in the midst of a global financial meltdown that saw typical MBA feeder companies such as Lehman Brothers and Bear Stearns vaporize overnight. However, despite the slow start to their post-MBA careers, the class of 2010 has rebounded well, Forbes notes.

To learn more about the methodology of the Forbes ranking, hiring trends, and the debt situation of the Class of 2010, you can read the original article on Forbes.com.

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How to Make the Most of Your First Year of B-School

Are you hoping to head to b-school next fall? It’s never to early to learn from students who are currently where you want to be. This past year, Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management has published …

first year of business school

Are you hoping to head to b-school next fall? It’s never to early to learn from students who are currently where you want to be. This past year, Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management has published the viewpoints of now second-year student Rohan Rajiv as he shares the lessons learned at Kellogg that he considers most relevant to MBA applicants.

His latest post is extensive, and full of helpful tips on how to make the most of your first year in an MBA program. No matter whether Kellogg is on your short list or not, his experiences and feedback can help orient you during that first hectic year.

Rajiv covers several areas, from academics to career, to extracurriculars and social and family priorities. While veryone will have different priorities while at business school, his post is illuminating for its thorough examination of these often-competing aspects of the MBA experience.

Take a look, and do explore the links to some of the other subjects Rajiv has addressed this year. There’s sure to be something within that will be applicable to your MBA journey as well.

You may also be interested in:

10 Ways to Make the Most of Your B-School Experience

Advice for Your Time at B-School

Image credit: Flickr user Richard Foster (CC BY-SA 2.0)

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Tuesday Tips: Northwestern Kellogg MBA Essay Tips

Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management is a close-knit community that values leadership and teamwork. At the same time, diversity in experience, background and thought is important to the Kellogg admissions committee. Do your research …

Kellogg MBA essay tipsNorthwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management is a close-knit community that values leadership and teamwork. At the same time, diversity in experience, background and thought is important to the Kellogg admissions committee.

Do your research on the programs, activities, clubs, classes and professors at Kellogg as you approach your essays. While you are reading and conversing with students and alumni, envision how you will contribute to the community.

Kellogg has two mandatory video essays as part of the application process. After you submit your essays you will receive the questions, one of which will focus on Why Kellogg and another will be a general “getting to know you” question. The video essay is an opportunity for the admissions committee to see the person behind the accomplishments you will describe.

Prepare as if you would for an interview, drafting the topics you want to cover and practicing your presentation. The video should accurately portray your personality and demeanor, and extensive preparation will help you be comfortable and be yourself.

Video essays can be daunting, and Stacy Blackman Consulting has developed customized preparation to help you practice for this important component of the application and provide our expert feedback. Contact us to learn more about how we can prepare you for the entire Kellogg application.

Essay 1
Leadership and teamwork are integral parts of the Kellogg experience. Describe a recent and meaningful time you were a leader. What challenges did you face, and what did you learn? (450 words)

This essay focuses on leadership and teamwork using a behavioral essay framework. By seeing the details about exactly what you did and said in your leadership story, Kellogg admissions will understand how you are likely to perform in the future. When approaching this essay spend some time on set up to explain the background, and then use the majority of the space describing specifically what you did, thought, felt and how you behaved.

As the question specifically asks about challenges, it will be useful to show how you have overcome difficulty as a leader or learned from a tough situation. Don’t be nervous about showing weakness here. Every leader has to learn and develop, and willingness to be open to feedback and improve will be an asset to your profile.

Do not neglect mentioning teamwork, which is a core value of Kellogg’s culture. Your leadership experience is likely part of a team at work or in an extracurricular activity, and sensitivity to teamwork and collaboration in any leadership story demonstrates maturity and people skills.

Essay 2
Pursuing an MBA is a catalyst for personal and professional growth. How have you grown in the past? How do you intend to grow at Kellogg? (450 words)

This essay question is a hybrid of a classic career goals essay and a personal essay. Kellogg is interested in candidates who are able to integrate their personal and professional goals and show how a Kellogg MBA will serve both sides of life.

When you describe professional and personal growth in the past, make sure it is relevant to your plans to pursue an MBA at Kellogg. The story you tell in this essay should provide insight into your decision to pursue an MBA and allude to your future goals. Because this isn’t a question about your entire career thus far you can choose just one or two main experiences to share.

The topic of this essay should also be an experience that did show growth over time. Something like starting in an entry level position at work and progressing into a management role comes to mind easily, but also consider something like developing leadership skills over time and personal investment in your career. You could also focus on a passion outside of work that has developed over time and led to personal growth.

Dual-degree Applicants
For applicants to the MMM or JD-MBA dual degree programs, please explain why that program is right for you. (250 words)

Doing your research on Kellogg MBA’s academics and resources will help you answer the question about why you need a dual degree to achieve your goals. If you are applying to the MMM program, you’ll have to show how the degree will prepare you more effectively for your career goals than the MBA alone.

Be able to articulate what is different about the Kellogg MMM program as compared to the MBA and other joint degrees. Know the classes you want to take, the professors you hope to work for, and how the MMM experience will be an asset in your future career.

Similarly, the JD-MBA at Kellogg is a highly competitive admissions process and will require a very clear explanation of what you will do with both degrees after school. Consider the unique attributes of the Kellogg JD-MBA program as compared to others, and also why you specifically need both a JD and an MBA.

Re-Applicants Only
Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

In answering this question make sure you provide tangible evidence that you have improved the overall package you are submitting this year. Improvements like GMAT score or new quantitative classes are especially tangible, but a promotion, increase in responsibility at work, a job change or even a change of goals and mission can apply.

Additional Information (Optional)
If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

If there are any areas of concern, this is the correct place to address them. Strike an upbeat tone here and avoid excuses. Explain your issue clearly and focus most of the essay on the correction for the issue. For example, if you had a disciplinary issue in college, spend most of the essay demonstrating that you learned from the experience and have been an ideal citizen ever since.

Low GPA issues should be explained here, and if there is a grade of C or below on your transcript the admissions committee will want to know why and feel comfortable it is an outlier in your overall academic record. For academic questions make sure you emphasize your improved performance either later in your college career or in subsequent work or classes since college.

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Kellogg School Posts Fall 2016 Deadlines, Essay Questions

The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University has announced the application deadlines and essay topics for the 2015-2016 admissions season. Deadlines Round 1 Application due: September 22, 2015 Decision released: December 16, 2015 Round …

Kellogg deadlines and essaysThe Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University has announced the application deadlines and essay topics for the 2015-2016 admissions season.

Deadlines

Round 1

Application due: September 22, 2015
Decision released: December 16, 2015

Round 2

Application due: January 6, 2016
Decision released: March 23, 2016

Round 3

Application due: April 6, 2016
Decision released: May 11, 2016

Applications are due no later than 5 p.m. CT on the application deadline date. All applicants are considered equally; however, the earlier you apply, the greater chance of accommodating your interview preference. If you’re an international applicant, Kellogg encourages you to apply in Round 1 or 2 to allow time for your visa application.

MBA Essay Questions

  1.  Leadership and teamwork are integral parts of the Kellogg experience. Describe a recent and meaningful time you were a leader. What challenges did you face, and what did you learn? (450 words)
  2. Pursuing an MBA is a catalyst for personal and professional growth. How have you grown in the past? How do you intend to grow at Kellogg? (450 words)

Certain applicants will respond to additional questions:

  • Dual-degree applicants: For applicants to the MMM or JD-MBA dual degree programs, please explain why that program is right for you. (250 words)
  • Re-applicants: Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

All applicants have the opportunity to provide explanations or clarification in Additional Information:

  • If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

After submitting a completed application, each applicant will be asked to complete two Video Essay Questions. One will be about the candidate’s interest in Kellogg and the other will be a “getting to know you” type of question.

Please look over the instructions on the Kellogg MBA admissions website for detailed information on how to practice for this format.

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