Tag Archives: Kellogg School of Management

Kellogg MBA Essay Questions, Deadlines for 2013-2014

The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University has posted the updated MBA essay questions and deadlines for the class entering in Fall 2014. The questions are quite similar to last year’s prompts, though Kellogg …

Kellogg essays

The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University has posted the updated MBA essay questions and deadlines for the class entering in Fall 2014. The questions are quite similar to last year’s prompts, though Kellogg has eliminated the 25-word “fun fact” essay this time around.

Deadlines

Round 1

Deadline: October 16, 2013

Decision: December 18, 2013

Round 2

Deadline: January 7, 2014

Decision: March 25, 2014

Round 3

Deadline: April 2, 2014

Decision: May 15, 2014

Applicants should take special note that Kellogg recommends an earlier submission for those requesting an off-campus interview to allow the greatest opportunity to locate an interview match. Here are the recommended submission dates for off-campus interview requests:

Round 1: September 18, 2013

Round 2: December 3, 2013

Round 3: March 19, 2014

Applications received after these date will continue to be matched but may see further restricted interview availability.

Essays

Essay 1
What’s the greatest obstacle you’ve overcome (personally or professionally)?
How has overcoming this obstacle prepared you to achieve success now and in the future? (350 word limit)

Essay 2
What have been your most significant leadership experiences?  What challenges did you face, and what impact did you have?
This is your opportunity to explain how you Think Bravely. (500 word limit)

Essay 3
Part 1: What career/role are you looking to pursue and why?  (250 word limit)
Part 2: Why are Kellogg and the MBA essential to achieving these career goals?  (250 word limit)
(Please answer Part 2 in terms of your program choice: One-Year, Two-Year, MMM, JD-MBA).

Re-Applicants Only
Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (400 word limit) Please note: re-applicants are required to answer this question in addition to #1-3.

Additional Information (Optional)
If needed, briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (No word limit)

***

The Kellogg School anticipates that the MBA application will be available in mid-August.

Posted in General, School News | Tagged , , ,

Move From Family Business to B-School

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA blog on U.S.News.com Applicants who have worked in a family business sometimes worry that their professional profile won’t measure up when compared with other MBA hopefuls …

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA blog on U.S.News.com

Applicants who have worked in a family business sometimes worry that their professional profile won’t measure up when compared with other MBA hopefuls with more traditional employment paths. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Every year, top schools accept students who will go back to work for the family business. In fact, 9 percent of the applicants accepted into the Harvard Business School class of 2014 had worked for, or planned to work for, their family-owned company.

Business schools strive to compose a cohort of diverse personalities and backgrounds to guarantee lively discussions, so depending on your role in the company and the type of business itself, your experiences would likely add a unique perspective to the class.

Family business management has emerged as an important discipline at business schools as second- and third-generation family members realize the need for specialized skills in order to take over the reins and create a more corporate work environment. Over the past decade, schools have introduced courses and clubs on family business, founded centers dedicated to the subject or launched concentrations in this area.

Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management has a Center for Family Enterprises. Columbia Business School, stating that 80 percent of businesses worldwide are classified as family businesses, offered a course this spring on Family Business Management. And students and alumni of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School can participate in the Wharton Family Business Club.

Part of your school selection research should focus on what types of resources and support for family businesses are offered by your target programs. For many applicants, a one-year MBA program is ideal since you won’t need the internship and recruiting opportunities that job-switching students in two-year programs rely on.

I advise applying to the best schools that you think you can get into because they will offer a great education as well as the best networking opportunities. Also, think about whether the school’s geographic location will help you build a network which would directly help your family business.

If the school offers a student club focused on this group, reaching out to current members for their insight on the program’s benefits might prove invaluable in your decision-making process.

As with any winning application, the strategy in this case is to show in detail how an MBA degree will help you further your professional goals. Explain with specifics what you need to learn in order to grow the family business.

Paint a clear picture of your vision for the company’s future, and leave no doubt as to how an MBA will help you make an impact on the business after graduation. That way, the admissions committee understands why business school is the logical next step.

For your essays, start brainstorming some of the challenges your business has faced, and come up with examples that show how you as a family worked to overcome those obstacles. Business schools place a high value on teamwork, and what better way to show commitment and follow-through than by demonstrating you know how to work well with others to achieve a common goal?

As many applicants know, the ideal recommender for an MBA application is the manager to whom you report directly. However, if your immediate supervisors are relatives, you’ll need to get creative since you cannot have a family member write your recommendation letter.

Can you approach a supervisor or manager from a company you’ve previously worked for? Or have you worked closely with any clients or vendors that can speak to your managerial or leadership abilities?

Our client Bill had been working for the family business, a manufacturing company in Baltimore, for three years after college.

[Get more MBA application advice from the trenches.]

After brainstorming for recommenders he could approach outside the business, Bill hit upon a retail vendor that had been supplied by his company for more than a decade with whom he’d built a strong relationship. Since this vendor was evaluating Bill on many similar criteria as a direct supervisor and was an objective, outside source, he turned out to be the perfect choice.

In the end, Bill’s family business-based application fared well next to candidates coming from a corporate background. He was ultimately admitted to Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, and chose Darden to be a little closer to home.

Alberto Gimeno, director of Esade Business School‘s International Family Business Lab, recently noted in the Financial Times that “Concepts such as honesty, pride, loyalty and long-term commitment … are everyday practices of successful family businesses around the world.”

If you’re planning on pursuing an MBA to learn how to take your family business to the next level, take pride in your professional circumstances and know that business schools will value your accomplishments and responsibilities, whether acquired at a Fortune 500 company or under Mom and Dad’s tutelage.

Posted in General | Tagged , , , , , ,

Kellogg School Wins 2013 International Impact Investing Challenge

Four MBA students from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management took top honors at the 2013 International Impact Investing Challenge on April 26th at the World Bank in Washington, DC. The third annual competition, hosted …

Four MBA students from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management took top honors at the 2013 International Impact Investing Challenge on April 26th at the World Bank in Washington, DC.

The third annual competition, hosted and organized by Kellogg and INSEAD, challenged graduate students to propose and defend a sustainable investment strategy that supports progress on global impact issues. Twelve finalist teams presented their proposals to a panel of judges, including experienced officers and investors of family foundations, pension funds and university endowments.

Innovation in Healthcare

The winning team, Outcomes Innovation Capital, included Kellogg students William “BJ” Bronston, Rebecca Johnson, Ratula “Milly” Shome and Nikki Tyler. The team won first place for their outcomes-based security to address the diabetes epidemic in the United States.

“Our team is thrilled at the support we have received regarding the outcomes-based security we developed,” said Tyler, speaking on behalf of the team. “We are excited by both its financial and social potential and look forward to continuing its development in the future.”

The team will receive $10,000. The overall runner up, Thammasat Business School from Thailand, was recognized for EThree Fund and will receive $5,000.

High Performance, High Reward

“This challenge provides a platform for graduate students to create and pitch high-performance, high-reward and high-impact investment strategies to prospective institutional investors,” said Jamie Jones, director of social entrepreneurship at Kellogg.

“Once again, the judges were impressed by the innovative and displays of financial creativity exhibited by the finalists on topics like flexible farm financing, medical education loan models, and funds to address urban food deserts.”

The International Impact Investing Challenge is supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, World Bank Institute, Morgan Stanley, McCall Foundation, Milken Institute, Equilibrium Capital Group, and Impact Assets.

Posted in School News | Tagged , ,

Kellogg’s Super Bowl Ad Review Wrap Up

While the rest of America was riveted by Beyoncé’s half-time performance and the power outage at the New Orlean’s Super Dome, a group of almost 60 MBA students from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management …

While the rest of America was riveted by Beyoncé’s half-time performance and the power outage at the New Orlean’s Super Dome, a group of almost 60 MBA students from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management Marketing Club studied the event from another perspective during the School’s ninth annual Super Bowl Advertising Review.

Students watched the event and rated the advertisers using a set of academic criteria known as ADPLAN to rank the most and least successful advertisers. ADPLAN is an acronym for Attention, Distinction, Positioning, Linkage, Amplification and Net equity.

First place went to the  Tide “Miracle Stain”  spot as the best ad during Sunday’s game, while BlackBerry ranked at the bottom of the always-anticipated Review due to weak branding and the lack of a compelling benefit.

YouTube Preview Image

“Tide really broke through the clutter with a very engaging spot,” said Clinical Professor of Marketing Tim Calkins, who leads the event along with Associate Professor of Marketing Derek D. Rucker. “At Kellogg, our Review evaluates the ads based on strategic execution and the potential to build brands. Tide, M&M’s and Best Buy all did a terrific job connecting engaging spots to product benefits.”

Students judged the advertisements based on their potential to drive sales, favorably impact companies’ bottom lines and improve brand awareness, as opposed to evaluating the commercials according to their popularity.

In a wrap-up posted on the Review’s blog, Professor Calkins noted two big trends this year: an increase in longer spots that develop a story, and a huge boost in social media tie-ins during the game. If you’d like to see which spots earned the top, middling, and lowest marks, and read commentary from the Review explaining their picks, check out Calkin’s post, which includes all of commercial spots in question.

Posted in General, School News | Tagged , , , , ,

Kellogg Expands Career Management Center

Earlier this week, the Career Management Center at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management—named the “undisputed winner” in student satisfaction by Poets & Quants— announced several new enhancements designed to make the department work even …

Earlier this week, the Career Management Center at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management—named the “undisputed winner” in student satisfaction by Poets & Quants— announced several new enhancements designed to make the department work even harder for MBA students.

Following meetings with students, alumni and key employers to determine where the department excelled and where it could improve, the CMC has implemented a restructuring plan that enhances services in three key areas:

Global Relations

Kellogg’s CMC will now have a director of global relations and international coaching tasked with identifying, building and maintaining relationships with employers worldwide so as to raise the profile of the Kellogg brand around the globe.   

Former CMC Senior Associate Director Carla Edelston will take on this role, which will enable the entire team to act as a resource for students looking to work outside their home region.

Coaching Volume

CMC Managing Director Michael Malone says that while the team has done outstanding work with a very lean staff, the time has come to add more coaches on the roster.

“We are building further bench strength so we can extend our reach,” he says. “We want to have the right blend and volume of coaches to build and maintain relationships and show students we are truly interested not just in short-term but long-term success.”

Employer Relations

In order to build deeper connections with employers whose hiring needs don’t adhere to an on-campus recruiting style, Malone has added two new development team members to uncover opportunities in an array of industries, from media to clean tech, investment management to real estate.

This three-prong approach should ensure that the CMC at Kellogg School of Management continues to provide exceptional support for students, alumni and employers.

“The most important factor is that they find something that fits,” Malone says. “We will work through every stage of a student’s search, and they will continue on into their alumni career with that support behind them.”

Posted in General | Tagged , , , ,

2012 MBA Job Placement Report

Wondering which MBA programs boast the best track record for MBA job placement? The results of Bloomberg Businessweek‘s recently released study of job placement rates among the top-30 U.S. business schools may surprise you. With …

Wondering which MBA programs boast the best track record for MBA job placement? The results of Bloomberg Businessweek‘s recently released study of job placement rates among the top-30 U.S. business schools may surprise you.

With only a tiny fraction of 2012 graduates still out of work three months after graduation, the top spot goes to Emory University’s Goizueta Business School, which saw just 2 percent of students without job offers within that time frame.

UC Berkeley Haas School of Business ranks second, and I’m happy to see my alma mater Kellogg School of Management nab third place. Only 4 percent of Kellogg graduates had no job offers within three months of earning their degrees—a steady improvement over the 6 percent without an offer in 2011 and the 10 percent in 2010.

Top Ten Business Schools in 2012 for MBA Job Placement

1. Emory University: Goizueta Business School

2. University of California at Berkeley: Haas School of Business

3. Northwestern University: Kellogg School of Management

4. MIT Sloan School of Management

5. Columbia Business School

6. Rice University: Jones Graduate School of Business

7. University of Chicago Booth School of Business

8. Indiana University: Kelley School of Business

9. University of Pennsylvania: Wharton School

10. Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and Harvard Business School, tied

Several stellar programs make up the other end of the spectrum, which will no doubt come as a shock to many readers. In the bottom five, the study reports Yale School of Management is 25th, Stanford Graduate School of Business is 26th, UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School at 27th, UM Ross School of Business at 28th, and Southern Methodist University Cox School of Business in 29th place.

The Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California came in last at no. 30. Twenty-three percent of USC business school graduates did not have a job offer within three months of earning their degree.

According to the business publication, consulting was the most popular industry, followed closely by financial services. Other hot industries for graduates this year were technology, consumer products, and energy.

Meanwhile, employers such as Boston Consulting Group, Amazon.com, and McKinsey were active on the recruiting scene, snapping up many of this year’s most promising MBA graduates and ranking as top employers on many business school campuses, Bloomberg Businessweek reveals.

Editors note that the job placement report refers to job offers received within three months. Though some may argue that jobs offered isn’t the same as job offers accepted, associate editor Louis Lavelle points out that at three months out, the percentage of offers and acceptances is virtually identical at every school. “There aren’t a whole lot of MBAs sitting around collecting offers all summer without jumping on one,” Lavelle says.

Posted in General | Tagged , , , , , ,