Tag Archives: MIT Sloan

Tuesday Tips: MIT Sloan School of Management MBA Essay Tips

On its website, MIT Sloan states that “innovation and collaboration [are] at the heart of what we do.“ Your task is to remain focused on your overall application strategy and choose two key stories that …

On its website, MIT Sloan states that “innovation and collaboration [are] at the heart of what we do.“ Your task is to remain focused on your overall application strategy and choose two key stories that can showcase your achievements at school, work and extracurricular activities. At the same time, keep in mind that MIT is seeking interesting students to build a class that can learn from each other and continue the tradition of innovation.

Remember to choose examples from the last three years of your life, as specifically directed in the instructions, for the most relevant and recent examples.

Because MIT Sloan does not require the standard “career goals” essay, your work background will be mainly communicated through the required resume and cover letter. The resume should be approached in a similar way to other MBA application resumes. Avoid industry lingo, communicate your measurable achievements, and focus on aspects of your job that involve leadership and teamwork.

Make sure to double check your deadlines for this season before making your MBA application plans.


MIT Sloan Cover Letter
Please prepare a cover letter (up to 500 words) seeking a place in the MIT Sloan MBA program. Your letter should describe your accomplishments, address any extenuating circumstances that may apply to your application, and conform to standard business correspondence. Your letter should be addressed to Mr. Rod Garcia, Senior Director of Admissions.

Think about how you would approach a cover letter for a job application. You would think about the requirements of the position, and pick the most relevant achievements from your past experience to showcase. Approach this cover letter in the same way to make a strong case for your selection into the MIT Sloan class. Just as with a professional cover letter, make sure you introduce yourself and explain why you are seeking admission to MIT.

The cover letter is also your opportunity to make the case for your fit with MIT Sloan. Note that the cover letter format will require a marketing approach that focuses on key points that will make you a great MIT Sloan student, rather than the narrative style of the typical career goals type of essay. Personal touch points with current or former MIT Sloan students are a great way to learn more about the school, and may give you the most personalized information about the school targeted to your situation.

Essay 1: Please describe a time when you had to convince a person or a group of your idea. (500 words or fewer, limited to one page)

The two behavioral questions in the MIT Sloan application require you to describe your past accomplishments and experience on a very pragmatic level. A key part of the MIT Sloan set of essays is the focus on understanding how you work, think and act. The instructions ask you to provide a brief overview of the situation, and then follow the situation with a detailed description of what you did. This requires being very specific about your thoughts and actions as you respond to each essay question.

This question is seeking to understand how you work with a team when you are not necessarily in charge. A work or extracurricular example where you demonstrated emotional intelligence would be ideal here. When did you realize you needed to convince someone to accept your idea? What was your strategy and how did you read group or individual dynamics to successfully sell in your concept? This essay will demonstrate your ability to lead from within a group, or to manage up in situations when you are not in charge.

MIT Sloan Essay 2: Please describe a time when you overcame a personal setback. (500 words or fewer, limited to one page)

Setbacks can be either a result of your own actions or of circumstances, and the most important aspect of a setback is how you were able to overcome the situation. Leadership can be effectively formed through difficulty and MIT Sloan is interested to see how you react to setbacks. Are you someone who can effectively navigate disappointment? How do you react when challenged? Are you able to learn from experience?

Use most of the allotted space to describe your reaction to the setback rather than the background story. As you recount your setbacks it will be crucial to demonstrate what you have learned. Think about why you selected each experience and what change and growth resulted from the situation. This essay is your opportunity to demonstrate your maturity, flexibility and leadership qualities.

MIT Sloan Supplemental Information (Optional)
You may use this section to address whatever else you want the Admissions Committee to know. (250 words or fewer, limited to one page)

If there are any areas of concern, this is the correct place to address them. Strike an upbeat tone here and avoid excuses. Explain your issue clearly and focus most of the essay on the correction for the issue. For example, if you had a disciplinary issue in college, spend most of the issue demonstrating that you learned from the experience and have been an ideal citizen ever since.

If you do not have a weakness to address here, it’s an ideal opportunity to provide any information that you were unable to work into the other three essays. If you have an unusual background, hobby or extracurricular experience, this may be an opportunity to provide that information to the admissions committee.

We can help you approach your MIT Sloan MBA application. Contact Stacy Blackman Consulting to learn more.

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MIT Sloan Announces 2012-2013 Deadlines, Essay Topics

The MIT Sloan School of Management has posted the two rounds of deadlines and two essay prompts for the 2012-2013 MBA application season. Round 1 Deadline: October 24, 2012 Notification: January 29, 2013 Round 2 …

The MIT Sloan School of Management has posted the two rounds of deadlines and two essay prompts for the 2012-2013 MBA application season.

Round 1

Deadline: October 24, 2012

Notification: January 29, 2013

Round 2

Deadline: December 27, 2012

Notification: April 2, 2013

 

Essays

In each of the essays, MIT Sloan asks applicants to limit the experiences you discuss to those which have occurred in the past three years, and to describe in detail what you thought, felt, said, and did.

Essay 1: Please describe a time when you had to convince a person or a group of your idea. (500 words or fewer, limited to one page)

Essay 2: Please describe a time when you overcame a personal setback. (500 words or fewer, limited to one page)

 

The online application for entry in August 2013 will be available in July.

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Tuesday Tips: MIT Sloan MBA Essay Tips

On its website, MIT Sloan states that “innovation and collaboration [are] at the heart of what we do.“ This set of essays has remained consistent for the past several years, with a cover letter and …

On its website, MIT Sloan states that “innovation and collaboration [are] at the heart of what we do.“ This set of essays has remained consistent for the past several years, with a cover letter and a set of behavioral questions. Your task is to remain focused on your overall application strategy and choose stories that can showcase your achievements at school, work and extracurriculars. At the same time, keep in mind that MIT is seeking students with unique approaches and backgrounds to build a class that can learn from each other and continue the tradition of innovation.

Remember to choose examples from the last three years of your life, as specifically directed in the instructions, for the most relevant and recent examples.

Because MIT Sloan does not require the standard “career goals” essay, your work background will be mainly communicated through the required resume and cover letter. The resume should be approached in a similar way to other MBA application resumes. Avoid industry lingo, communicate your measurable achievements, and focus on aspects of your job that involve leadership and teamwork.

Make sure to double check your deadlines for this season before making your MBA application plans.

MIT Sloan Cover Letter
Prepare a cover letter (up to 500 words) seeking a place in the MIT Sloan MBA Program. Describe your accomplishments and include an example of how you had an impact on a group or organization. Your letter should conform to standard business correspondence and be addressed to Mr. Rod Garcia, Director of MBA Admissions.
Think about how you would approach a cover letter for a job application. You would think about the requirements of the position, and pick the most relevant achievements from your past experience to showcase. Approach this cover letter in the same way to make a strong case for your selection into the class of 2012. Just as with a professional cover letter, make sure you introduce yourself and explain why you are seeking admission.

The cover letter is also your opportunity to make the case for your fit with MIT Sloan. Note that the cover letter format will require a recruiting and marketing approach that focuses on key points that will make you a great MIT Sloan student, rather than the narrative style of the typical career goals type of essay. To learn more about the school, there are resources such as student blogs, campus visits and admissions events around the world. Personal touch points with current or former MIT Sloan students are a great way to learn more about the school, and may be the most customized to your specific questions.

The instructions ask specifically for key accomplishments and your impact on an organization, which should be concise and focused examples that support your reasons for applying and why you should be accepted into the class. Other professional experience should be focused on your unique selling proposition for admission to the MIT Sloan class.

MIT Sloan Essay 1: Please describe a time when you went beyond what was defined, expected, established, or popular. (500 words or fewer, limited to one page)

This question can be used to describe a situation when you exceeded everyone’s expectations, or one when you pursued a path that was not established or popular. This will demonstrate your ability to motivate yourself and show what drives you to accomplish above and beyond your job description or responsibilities.

All of the behavioral questions in the MIT Sloan application require you to describe your past accomplishments and experience on a very pragmatic level. A key part of the MIT Sloan set of essays is the focus on understanding how you work, think and act. The instructions ask you to provide a brief overview of the situation, and then follow the situation with a detailed description of what you did. This requires being very specific about your thoughts and actions as you respond to each essay question.

MIT Sloan Essay 2: Please describe a time when you convinced an individual or group to accept one of your ideas. (500 words or fewer, limited to one page)

This question is seeking to understand how you work with a team when you are not necessarily in charge. A work or extracurricular example where you demonstrated emotional intelligence would be ideal here. When did you realize you needed to convince someone to accept your ideas? What was your strategy and how did you read group or individual dynamics to successfully sell in your concept? This essay will demonstrate your ability to lead from within a group, or to manage up in situations when you are not in charge.

Essay 3: Please describe a time when you had to make a decision without
having all the information you needed. (500 words or fewer, limited to one
page)

This MIT Sloan essay seeks to understand your problem solving ability. Most executives will need to make a decision with limited information, and it’s revealing to describe the process that you take to reach that goal. Do you go with your gut feelings? Or do you make educated estimates? Think about a time when you needed to make a mission critical decision and you did not have the time to gather all of the information you may have wanted.

If you tend to follow a linear process of thinking this question will be more straightforward for you – just describe how you make decisions and what you do when you can’t have all the information you want. For some non-linear thinkers decision making can be a flash of insight which is tough to describe. Going with a gut feeling isn’t the wrong answer, just one you may need to parse out more specifically in order to communicate effectively in this essay. Think about talking to your colleagues, friends or family to see how they view your decision making process. You might find more detail than you knew existed! In either case, this question requires you to fully describe your thinking process so the adcomm can understand it thoroughly.

MIT Sloan Supplemental Information (Optional)
You may use this section to address whatever else you want the Admissions Committee to know. (250 words or fewer, limited to one page)

If there are any areas of concern, this is the correct place to address them. Strike an upbeat tone here and avoid excuses. Explain your issue clearly and focus most of the essay on the correction for the issue. For example, if you had a disciplinary issue in college, spend most of the issue demonstrating that you learned from the experience and have been an ideal citizen ever since.

If you do not have a weakness to address here, it’s an ideal opportunity to provide any information that you were unable to work into the other three essays. If you have an unusual background, hobby or extracurricular experience, this may be an opportunity to provide that information to the adcomm.

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MBA Students Help Fortune 1000 Companies Save Energy, Boost Bottom Line

Sometimes helping the environment can be good for a business’ bottom line. Just ask the companies and the MBA students who have participated in the Environmental Defense Fund’s Climate Corp. Initiative.

Sometimes helping the environment can be good for a business’ bottom line. Just ask the companies and the MBA students who have participated in the Environmental Defense Fund’s Climate Corp. Initiative.

Recently, the Environmental Leader reported that the Climate Corp. has helped 66 Fortune 1000 companies save $439 million in operational costs and prevent 557,000 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions yearly. New companies joining the program this summer include Facebook, Dunkin’ Brands, Microsoft, JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts.

MBA students who are accepted into the program will be placed at these and other companies to help them locate energy-saving strategies. So far, 84 percent of student recommendations have been initiated or completed by the participating companies. The Environmental Leader wrote about a Duke Fuqua School of Business student who helped AT&T achieve an 80 percent savings in energy use on a lighting project, and a University of Michigan Ross School of Business student whose energy solutions will help the Hospital Corporation of America save 7.8 million annually in electricity costs.

Companies participating in the Climate Corp. Initiative aren’t the only ones focused on environmental efforts these days. A new study conducted by the MIT Sloan Management Review and the Boston Consulting Group found the following, also reported by the Environmental Leader:

69 percent of companies plan to increase their investment in and management of sustainability this year. Just over one-quarter (26 percent) plan no change, and only two percent plan to cut back on their commitment.

Which shows that MBAs participating in projects like Climate Corp. aren’t simply learning how to be energy-savvy. They’re also adding experience to their resumes that will make them more appealing to the growing number of sustainability-minded employers.

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MIT Sloan Announces Partnership With Turkey’s Sabanci School of Management

The MIT Sloan School of Management last week announced it has formed a partnership with Turkey’s Sabanci School of Management. For the next five years, Sabanci executive MBA students will be invited to take classes …

The MIT Sloan School of Management last week announced it has formed a partnership with Turkey’s Sabanci School of Management. For the next five years, Sabanci executive MBA students will be invited to take classes at MIT, and MIT Sloan faculty will teach courses at Sabanci’s Istanbul campus.

This marks MIT Sloan’s first partnership in the Middle Eastern region. The school already has affiliations with programs in Brazil, Russia, India, China and Korea.

Each year, Sabanci will send 50 of its executive MBA students to Cambridge for two weeks, to learn more about business in the U.S. They will visit Boston-area businesses and attend lectures at MIT Sloan. The visiting students will also be eligible to apply to MIT Sloan’s two-semester Master of Science in Management Studies program.

By sending faculty to Sabanci as guest lecturers, the MIT Sloan community hopes to strengthen its knowledge of Turkey and the region, as well as “deepen its ties with the worldwide academic community,” according to an MIT Sloan press release.

Said MIT Sloan dean David C. Schmittlein:

“As a leading educational institution in an exciting and rapidly developing region, Sabanci University was an excellent choice for MIT Sloan’s first collaboration in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. We are honored to have the opportunity to engage with Sabanci’s outstanding faculty and students with the shared and mutually beneficial goal of transforming global management practice.”

No word yet on whether the partnership will provide opportunities for MIT Sloan students interested in Middle Eastern business culture to travel to Sabanci. Other North American MBA programs that offer students the chance to attend exchange programs with universities in the Middle East include the Kellogg  School of Management, UNC’s Kenan-Flagler Business School and Toronto’s Rotman School of Management.

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iPad to Streamline MBA Admissions at MIT Sloan

The Apple iPad will revolutionize the MBA admissions process at MIT Sloan School of Management starting with the class of 2013, when all applications will be reviewed on the tablet device rather than on paper. …

The Apple iPad will revolutionize the MBA admissions process at MIT Sloan School of Management starting with the class of 2013, when all applications will be reviewed on the tablet device rather than on paper.

Rod Garcia, director of MBA admissions, tells the Wall Street Journal that all 15 members of the admissions team have received iPads at cost of about $9,500, and the move will save the school approximately $10,000 annually in paper costs.

The iPads should also streamline admissions, Garcia predicts, since paper applications were often misplaced or needed to be shipped to admissions staffers who travel worldwide to interview applicants.

(image credit: Flickr user smemon87, CC 2.0)


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