Tag Archives: NYU Stern

Tuesday Tips: NYU Stern MBA Essay Tips

If you are applying to NYU Stern keep in mind the admissions criteria that will be used to consider your application. As the website states, “we seek students with strong intellectual ability and superior interpersonal …

If you are applying to NYU Stern keep in mind the admissions criteria that will be used to consider your application. As the website states, “we seek students with strong intellectual ability and superior interpersonal skills (IQ + EQ)” The individual components of your application will be academic ability, professional achievements and career aspirations, and personal characteristics. While your academics will be evaluated mainly through your GMAT and GPA, the essays are a crucial tool to communicate who you are to NYU Stern.

Make sure to check the deadlines before you get started.

Essay 1: Professional Aspirations (750 word maximum)

(a) Why pursue an MBA (or dual degree) at this point in your life?

(b) What actions have you taken to determine that Stern is the best fit for your MBA experience?

(c) What do you see yourself doing professionally upon graduation?

Why MBA, why now, is an important question to answer. While many people seek the degree, NYU wants to invest in those who can use it most effectively. Perhaps you’re seeking an MBA for networking or professional credibility, or maybe you want an MBA to learn specific skills to change careers. Whatever your own personal reasons may be, make sure you can point to specific aspects of the MBA education both generally and specifically at Stern that are necessary to achieve your goals.

Note that this question specifically asks about your interest in pursuing an MBA at this point in your life. Why is now the right time for you, both personally and professionally? What will an MBA add to your already successful career trajectory to get you to the next level? If you are an older applicant you will need to spend time carefully communicating that you realize what an MBA can and can’t do for you at your professional level, and that you have a plan to leverage the MBA professionally in your next job.

This essay also offers an opportunity to demonstrate your fit with NYU Stern and describe why NYU Stern is the right place for you to spend the next two years of your life. Certainly personal experience of the campus through visits or student touch points would be ideal, but even if you are halfway around the world you can illustrate the many ways in which you learned about the NYU Stern experience.

The activities that most excite you academically should be logically related to your career goals explained in essay 1. The activities you are involved with might be professional, or could be personal hobbies or interests. This essay is your opportunity to describe who you are outside of work, and discussing the hobbies and extracurricular interests you have pursued thus far will be an important data point.

Your post MBA goal should be both achievable and demonstrate the need for an MBA. An MBA from NYU Stern will open professional doors for you, and you should demonstrate that you are ready to take advantage of those opportunities. Think about your past work experience, MBA education, and immediate post MBA goal as a logical sequence. Ideally your goal pulls from both your current work experience and the skills you will gain in the NYU MBA program.

Essay 2: Your Two Paths (500 word maximum)
The mission of the Stern School of Business is to develop people and ideas that transform the challenges of the 21st century into opportunities to create value for business and society. Given today’s ever-changing global landscape, Stern seeks and develops leaders who thrive in ambiguity, embrace a broad perspective and think creatively about the range of ways they can have impact.

(a) Describe two different and distinct paths you could see your career taking long term. How do you see your two paths unfolding?

(b) How do your paths tie to the mission of NYU Stern?

(c) What factors will most determine which path you will take?

New this year, Essay Two asks you to exercise a thought exercise about your future career goals. After identifying your immediate post-MBA career goal in Essay 1, where can you see your long-term career evolving? Again, both trajectories should be logical. For example, if you worked as an analyst in finance prior to your MBA, and plan to work in private equity post MBA, perhaps you see yourself as a partner in your PE firm as your first path, or operating a company as your second path. Each could unfold depending upon the choices you make or opportunities you see as you engage actively with your career.

The second part of this question asks you to tie both paths to the NYU Stern mission, which is to “develop people and ideas that transform the challenges of the 21st century into opportunities to create value for business and society.” Almost any career goal can reflect this mission, though infusing an element of leadership into your plans can help maximize your impact beyond the career of one individual. Developing people who can transform challenges could multiply your impact and create tremendous value.

In the third section of the question you should consider all of the factors you might use as criteria to evaluate future career goals. This is a great time to consider what has motivated you in the past ”“ do you thrive on achievement? Accomplishing a difficult goal? Or helping others? This question is one that demonstrates your ability to evaluate your own decision-making process, as well as revealing the values you hold most closely. Answer this question strategically to ensure you are intentionally revealing personal attributes that are most representative of your values and potential.


Essay 3: Personal Expression
Please describe yourself to your MBA classmates. You may use almost any method to convey your message (e.g. words, illustrations). Feel free to be creative. If you submit a non-written piece for Essay 3 (i.e., artwork or multimedia) or if you submit Essay 3 via mail, please upload a brief description of your submission with your online application.

Open-ended essays like this one can be intimidating. You are allowed any method to introduce yourself to your classmates, and you’re probably wondering what the best medium for your message is.

However, your content is king in this essay. As advised for a similar essay, the Chicago powerpoint question, the best first step is to brainstorm the information you want to convey. Reflect upon your unique personal qualities and what is valued most by your friends and family. How would you want your classmates to see you? What are some of the personal stories you would share with a new friend?

Once you have established the content you want to use for the NYU Stern essay 3, it’s time to consider the medium. If you are a visual person you may chose a drawing, painting or photo series. If you are a creative writer perhaps it’s a poem or short story. If none of the “creative” approaches feel right to you, feel free to write a standard essay where you explain who you are and introduce yourself to your classmates. The medium is not the most important aspect of this essay, rather the message and content of your composition will demonstrate who you are to the admissions committee.

Essay 4: Optional
Please provide any additional information that you would like to bring to the attention of the Admissions Committee. This may include current or past gaps in employment, further explanation of your undergraduate record or self-reported academic transcript(s), plans to retake the GMAT, GRE and/or TOEFL or any other relevant information.
If you are unable to submit a recommendation from your current supervisor, you must explain your reason in Essay 4.
If you are a re-applicant from last year, please explain how your candidacy has improved since your last application.

NYU Stern is quite clear about who should use the optional essay and who should not. Like many other schools, NYU Stern provides this opportunity for you to explain a low GPA, GMAT or TOEFL. If you are in that situation, avoid excuses. Focus on the facts, and explain why this performance is not indicative of your future performance at NYU Stern.

If you are not submitting a recommendation from your current employer, this is the place to explain the situation. A few valid reasons may include a brief tenure working for your current boss, that you are not sharing your MBA plans with your supervisor, or that you work more closely with other members of the team.

If you are a re-applicant it will be important to establish what has changed from last year. Have you earned a promotion? Improved your GMAT score? Whatever you have been able to develop since last year, highlight why you are a stronger candidate now.

If you are looking for guidance on your NYU Stern application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more.

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NYU Stern Announces 2012-2013 Deadlines, Essay Prompts

New York University’s Stern School of Business has announced the deadlines and essay questions for the 2012-2013 admissions cycle. Round 1 Deadline: November 15, 2012 Initial Notification*: February 15, 2013 Round 2 Deadline: January 15, …

New York University’s Stern School of Business has announced the deadlines and essay questions for the 2012-2013 admissions cycle.

Round 1

Deadline: November 15, 2012

Initial Notification*: February 15, 2013

Round 2

Deadline: January 15, 2013

Initial Notification: April 1, 2013

Round 3

Deadline: March 15, 2013

Initial Notification: June 1, 2013

*Initial notification means applicants will receive one of three types of notifications: an invitation to interview, waitlist offer, or denial of admissions.

Online applications must be submitted by midnight, U.S. Eastern Time, on the day of the deadline. Any mailed application material must be postmarked by the deadline date.

 

NYU Stern Essay Questions

Essay 1: Professional Aspirations (750 word maximum)

(a) Why pursue an MBA (or dual degree) at this point in your life?

(b) What actions have you taken to determine that Stern is the best fit for your MBA experience?

(c) What do you see yourself doing professionally upon graduation?

Essay 2: Your Two Paths (500 word maximum)

The mission of the Stern School of Business is to develop people and ideas that transform the challenges of the 21st century into opportunities to create value for business and society. Given today’s ever-changing global landscape, Stern seeks and develops leaders who thrive in ambiguity, embrace a broad perspective and think creatively about the range of ways they can have impact.

(a) Describe two different and distinct paths you could see your career taking long term. How do you see your two paths unfolding?

(b) How do your paths tie to the mission of NYU Stern?

(c) What factors will most determine which path you will take?

Essay 3: Personal Expression

Please describe yourself to your MBA classmates. You may use almost any method to convey your message (e.g. words, illustrations). Feel free to be creative. If you submit a non-written piece for Essay 3 (i.e., artwork or multimedia) or if you submit Essay 3 via mail, please upload a brief description of your submission with your online application.

Guidelines for Essay 3:

  • Your submission becomes the property of NYU Stern and cannot be returned for any reason.
  • If you submit a written essay, it should be 500 words maximum, double-spaced, 12-point font.
  • If you submit a video or audio file, it should be five minutes maximum.
  • If you prepare a multimedia submission, you may mail a CD, DVD or USB flash drive to the Admissions Office. These are the only acceptable methods of submission.
  • Please do not submit an internet link to any websites or to a video hosting service such as YouTube.
  • The Admissions Committee reserves the right to request an alternate Essay 3 if we are unable to view your submission.
  • Do not submit anything perishable (e.g. food), or any item that has been worn (e.g. clothing).

Essay 4: Optional

Please provide any additional information that you would like to bring to the attention of the Admissions Committee. This may include current or past gaps in employment, further explanation of your undergraduate record or self-reported academic transcript(s), plans to retake the GMAT, GRE and/or TOEFL or any other relevant information.

If you are unable to submit a recommendation from your current supervisor, you must explain your reason in Essay 4.

If you are a re-applicant from last year, please explain how your candidacy has improved since your last application.

*     *     *

Please refer to the NYU Stern website link above for additional information regarding the personal expression essay and further essay format specifics.

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NYU Stern Offers New Masters in Business Analytics

New York University Stern School of Business has announced it will offer a new Master of Science in Business Analytics in Shanghai and at the school’s Washington Square campus beginning in May 2013. The new …

New York University Stern School of Business has announced it will offer a new Master of Science in Business Analytics in Shanghai and at the school’s Washington Square campus beginning in May 2013. The new discipline, which stands at the intersection of business and technology, leverages the use of data as a strategic business asset and decision-making tool.

The MS in Business Analytics will be the first degree program to be offered at New York University’s downtown Shanghai campus, effectively launching the University’s granting of degrees in China. The degree is also the first accredited graduate level program in business analytics offered by a leading business school.

Designed for executives with at least 10 years’ experience in such areas as manufacturing, technology, government, health care, energy, real estate and construction, the MS in business analytics will be taught in five modules spanning one year.

English-language instruction and this scheduled format will allow executives from around the globe to participate, though the program is expected to appeal in particular to English-speaking Chinese executives as well as expatriates working in China.

“As the explosive growth of data fuels new business models and transforms the way business decisions are made, NYU Stern is leveraging its deep faculty expertise in quantitative methods, and the strength of its Information Systems, Operations and Management Sciences (IOMS) and Marketing departments, to offer this new MS in Business Analytics,” said Peter Henry, Dean of NYU Stern School of Business, when  when announcing the news.

“Our newest degree contributes to the foundation NYU is building in Shanghai as the first American university with independent legal status approved by the Ministry of Education.”

The program will be taught at NYU Stern’s Greenwich Village campus in New York and at the NYU Shanghai campus. Faculty will be drawn from NYU Stern’s top-ranked Information Systems (or IOMS) and Marketing departments.

“This new MS in Business Analytics adds another innovative degree to NYU Stern’s portfolio of global programs, one that responds to the increasing importance of data ”“its interpretation, modeling, and visualization — to business decision making at all levels,” said Eitan Zemel, NYU Stern’s Vice Dean for Global Programs.

NYU Stern also offers an MS in Risk Management, an MS in Global Finance with Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and the TRIUM Global Executive MBA, a joint program with the London School of Economics and HEC Paris.

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NYU Stern Launches MBA Specialization in Digital Marketing

New York University’s Stern School of Business recently announced the launch of a Digital Marketing specialization that will equip MBA students with the skills they’ll need to guide organizations navigating a digital world. Marketers today …

New York University’s Stern School of Business recently announced the launch of a Digital Marketing specialization that will equip MBA students with the skills they’ll need to guide organizations navigating a digital world.

Marketers today have more ways to deliver their messages than ever, says Russell Winer, chairman of the marketing department, specialization co-adviser, and CRM and digital marketing expert, therefore understanding the rules of online engagement and the power of digital to elevate a brand or a reputation will be critical.

Peter Henry, dean of NYU Stern, calls technology “both a powerful enabler and a disruptor of traditional business models” in a statement announcing the news.

“With the convergence of these two important areas of modern-day commerce–Marketing and Information Systems–students will learn from renowned faculty experts in these disciplines about how to transform today’s business challenges into tomorrow’s opportunities.”

MBA courses that count towards the specialization come from the Information, Operations and Management Sciences and Marketing departments, and include Brand Strategy, Data Mining for Business Analytics and Information Privacy Law, which is co-offered with NYU School of Law.

Co-curricular activities, such as the Graduate Marketing Association, the Luxury and Retail club and the Technology and New Media club complement the curriculum and provide opportunities to meet industry leaders and practitioners.

“The technology platforms enabled by the Internet, and the explosion of predictive data-driven analytics facilitated as a by-product of digital interactions is transforming how companies and governments interact with individuals and firms,” says Vasant Dhar, specialization co-adviser and an expert on predictive analytics, data mining and data governance.

“Today, a digital strategy is a cost of entry in business,” Dhar adds.

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Social Media Skills a Must for M.B.A.s, Survey Says

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News–Strictly Business blog. If you think social media is primarily good for reconnecting with long-lost friends from high school or stalking celebrities to find out what they had …

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News–Strictly Business blog.

If you think social media is primarily good for reconnecting with long-lost friends from high school or stalking celebrities to find out what they had for breakfast, think again.

Now more than ever, M.B.A. students and applicants live and breathe through social media, a new online survey reveals. And that level of social media use is a good thing, considering the growing demand in the business world for employees with honed social media skills.

After polling hundreds of both prospective and current b-school students, The MBA Tour found that 85 percent of potential students worldwide say they use social media sites to research their top school choices. This is higher than the 71 percent of students already enrolled who reported using social media for their school research, suggesting a massive upward trend is afoot.

Although most elite business schools use Facebook, Twitter, You Tube, and LinkedIn as part of their outreach strategy to potential applicants, it appears their efforts haven’t quite hit the mark. Approximately 14 percent of would-be students reported outright disappointment with their potential schools’ use of social media tools, or, while acknowledging that the schools had made an effort, 63 percent were left wanting more.

For current students or graduates, 55 percent felt the social media options and subsequent classes were either “not up to par with the growing industry” (17.7 percent) or simply weren’t provided (37.7 percent). Additionally, 99 percent of students researching business schools reported social media was either a “necessity in every field of study” (51.7 percent) or “somewhat important dependent on the field of study” (47.6 percent).

“The results are thought-provoking””especially as 85 percent of prospective students are researching the biggest choice of their life through social media,” says Peter von Loesecke, CEO and managing director of The MBA Tour. “We might want to ask whether schools are missing out on the right conversation with their students. What the survey suggests is schools might want to consider using social media not only for their recruitment programs, but also to more aggressively incorporate social media into their curriculum because there appears to be a growing demand both from students and businesses.”

Several schools have already noticed the demand, as readers may remember from my April post on Social Media in the M.B.A. Classroom, which highlighted courses on offer at Harvard Business School, Stanford Graduate School of Business, and Columbia Business School. For its part, the marketing department at New York University’s Stern School of Business has added two new courses on the subject just this year.

Social Media for Brand Managers, taught by adjunct marketing professor Joel Rubinson, is intended to equip marketing students to contribute to and even run cross-functional social media teams in a marketing world that is moving from brands broadcasting a message to brands listening and then engaging with people. Rubinson commented on my prior post that the last class maxed out at registration, proving what a hot topic this is.

For tomorrow’s business leaders, social media skills are essential, says Christine Eberle, a United Kingdom-based senior executive for Accenture’s Talent and Organization Performance practice and contributor to The Social Media Management Handbook. Eberle says as corporate recruitment evolves to meet the changing dynamics of the marketplace, graduates without a social media skill set could find themselves passed over.

“Businesses must learn how to use social media to start a two way conversation with their customers and potential customers,” says Eberle. “Those companies will look for that leadership among business school graduates.”

As someone with a presence on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube, I use these tools daily and they have become a huge part of my company’s communication efforts. The social media revolution wasn’t even a speck on the horizon when I was doing my M.B.A. at Kellogg School of Management, so I’ve had to self-educate and wing it in a medium that’s constantly evolving.

Schools are also realizing the landscape is changing more quickly than it has in the past and all institutions””like any enterprise””must adapt and evolve. “The demographics of the student body are partly what’s driving change,” says The MBA Tour’s von Loesecke. “The students themselves see this trend instinctively because they are the Internet generation””they’ve grown up with the Web. They know of no other world.”

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The M.B.A. Tool Box for Minority Applicants

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News–Strictly Business blog. Diversity is more than just a b-school buzz word. It is an essential ingredient for robust discourse in the classroom and beyond. To obtain the …

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News–Strictly Business blog.

Diversity is more than just a b-school buzz word. It is an essential ingredient for robust discourse in the classroom and beyond. To obtain the richest mix of perspectives and world views, business schools strive to compose a class with diversity in all possible forms: racial, ethnic, religious, cultural, socio-economic, and sexual orientation.

My last post assessed the landscape for LGBT students pursuing their M.B.A.s. This week, we take a look at some of the resources available to minority applicants both before and after they gain a seat at the school of their dreams.

For many potential applicants of color, the decision to go to business school isn’t an obvious one. They may not have many family members or friends who have pursued graduate management education, or perhaps the astronomical expense of elite M.B.A. programs is too off-putting. To these talented but unsure individuals, I say, take the plunge. There’s an extensive support network waiting to guide you through the rabbit warren that is the b-school application process.

While African Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans make up nearly 30 percent of the U.S. population, they comprise only 3 percent of senior leaders in corporations, nonprofits, and entrepreneurial ventures. Management Leadership for Tomorrow (MLT) confronts that crisis by providing the key ingredients””skills, coaching, and door-opening relationships””that unlock the potential in the next generation of minority leaders.

“MLT is an invaluable resource for minority applicants,” says Jennie Morrel, who worked as a senior advertising manager at the Random House Publishing Group before starting her M.B.A. at New York University’s Stern School of Business this fall. “MLT provides amazing training and coaching along with early access to admissions officers which made all the difference in my application process.”

The M.B.A. Prep program offered by MLT guides fellows through the application and interview process and shows them what it takes to be successful in business school and beyond. Through one-on-one coaching, early exposure to representatives from top schools, a skill development curriculum and lifelong alumni network, M.B.A. Prep provides the tools for high potential applicants to become high-impact business and community leaders.

Another can’t-miss resource is the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management (CGSM), which awards merit-based, full-tuition fellowships to the best and brightest candidates through an annual competition. Minority candidates can also apply to up to six Consortium schools with one application and thereby significantly reduce their application fee costs. As a CGSM fellow, Morrel points out a major perk of attending the Consortium’s Orientation Program in June: early access to recruiters before the semester had officially begun.

In addition to the resources and support provided by groups such as the National Black M.B.A. Association and the National Society of Hispanic M.B.A.s, future applicants should also make a point of learning about the Riordan Programs. The Riordan M.B.A. Fellows Program targets recent college graduates who are considering graduate education in business management. Its core purpose is to educate, prepare, and motivate these individuals to competitively apply and succeed in a top M.B.A. program and a career in management.

A Bloomberg Businessweek story on the slow gains in diversity at top M.B.A. programs reveals that Cornell University’s Johnson School reported the most dramatic increase in minority enrollment, having boosted the number of underrepresented minorities from 5 percent in 2000 to 21 percent in 2010.

Richard Battle-Baxter, who worked as a search engine marketing analyst and is just beginning his first term at the Johnson School, says campus diversity was of the utmost importance to him.

“Upon entering the application process I soon realized that each school had a different atmosphere just as each applicant has a different personality. I knew that I wanted to go to a school that was not only diverse in terms of ethnic backgrounds but also in terms of thought processes,” he says. “More importantly, I knew that in attending a school that strives to cover all of the diversity bases, the whole class would most likely consist of those who also wanted to be in on a diverse campus.”

Such diversity also influenced Morrel’s school selection process, and she says the Association of Hispanic and Black Business Students (AHBBS) at NYU Stern was present in every stage of her application. From reviewing her essays to calming her nerves on interview day, Morrel says the AHBBS is a strong community whose students were invested in her success, whether her interest lay in Stern or at another school.

As business becomes ever more global and interconnected, M.B.A. programs have to prepare future leaders who can successfully jump into any culture or environment, whether that means Wall Street, consulting, or a BRIC country (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) start-up. Diversity in the b-school classroom is the best preparation for the challenges and rewards of the multicultural marketplace.

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