Tag Archives: Rankings

Princeton Review 2015 B-School Rankings

The Princeton Review recently released the 2015 editions of its guides to business and law schools, which also include annual ranking lists uniquely based on student surveys. Among the ranking list categories and schools ranked …

The Princeton Review recently released the 2015 editions of its guides to business and law schools, which also include annual ranking lists uniquely based on student surveys. Among the ranking list categories and schools ranked #1 on them, you’ll find:

“Best Career Prospects”—Stanford Graduate School of Business

“Best Professors”—Yale School of Management

“Best Classroom Experience”—New York University Stern School of Business

“Toughest to Get Into” (the only ranking list in the books based on school-reported data)— Stanford Graduate School of Business

“Greatest Opportunity for Women”—Simmons College

“Best Green MBA”—Yale School of Management

Unlike other popular rankings, the Princeton Review does not rank the business or law schools hierarchically. “Each school in our books offers outstanding academics: no single law or b-school is ‘best’ overall,” says Robert Franek, SVP / Publisher of the Princeton Review.

“We publish rankings in several categories along with our detailed profiles of the schools to give applicants the broader information they need to determine which school will be best for them.”

 

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Choose Safety Schools for Your MBA Applications Carefully

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com Landing a seat at a top MBA program isn’t a slam-dunk for anybody. It’s getting increasingly competitive to get into the highest-ranked schools. …

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com

Landing a seat at a top MBA program isn’t a slam-dunk for anybody. It’s getting increasingly competitive to get into the highest-ranked schools.

The term safety school gets thrown around quite a bit in MBA admissions, and it’s important for applicants to have a clear understanding of what that term means before they start the school selection process.

The rule when coming up with a list of business schools is that you must feel genuine enthusiasm about attending each and every one of them, regardless of whether they are dream schools or programs you might consider a safer bet. If you would feel disappointed rather than ecstatic about advancing your career by attending a school, then do not apply. That’s a waste of everyone’s time and your money.

[Consider the benefits of looking beyond the top-ranked business schools.]

A good way to determine whether your list should include one or more safety schools is by asking yourself how important it is for you to go to business school next year. If the need is immediate, then definitely include a range of schools of varying degrees of competitiveness. The application pool fluctuates each year, and all you need is one admit, so spread some risk around.

However, if you’ve zeroed in on a handful of highly competitive programs that you strongly feel are the best choices for advancing your professional goals, and you have some flexibility with the timing, it would be better to focus your energies on the GMAT and elevating your profile in line with your target programs’ characteristics.

If you don’t get in the first time, you can learn from your weak points and reapply in the next application cycle.

A safety school doesn’t mean you’d be guaranteed an offer of admission, though. It merely means your chances are far greater than at a program with an acceptance rate of 15 percent or lower.

[Here are some tips to narrow down your b-school application list.]

So, in order to decide what qualifies as a safety school for you, start with the hard data points. As a general guideline, take a look at programs you like where your profile falls within the top 10 percent of admitted students.

Compare your undergraduate GPA, GMAT score, years of work experience and particular industry with those of accepted applicants reported by the school in their class profile page. If your industry is underrepresented, consider that an advantage for your application.

Everyone has different reasons for applying to business school. Your main focus may be on networking prospects, the educational experience, geographic location, culture, special programming or even family tradition. If you’re excited about any of those elements at a school and would be happy to attend for any of those reasons, then consider it, even if it’s a safe choice.

I had a client who applied to both University of California—Los Angeles Anderson School of Management and Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. Of the two, Stanford is obviously the more competitive “reach” school, but my client was from Los Angeles and would have been happy to go to Anderson, thus making it a great selection for a safety school.

[Fight the fear of failure when applying to MBA programs.]

Ultimately, he did get into Stanford and chose that school over the full scholarship offer he received from UCLA.

Another client faced the difficult decision of remaining on the waitlist at the University of California—Berkeley Haas School of Business, his dream choice, or accepting an offer of admission from the University of Texas—Austin McCombs School of Business, his safety school and one he would be thrilled to attend.

When the waitlist purgatory continued into summer, even after he’d submitted a deposit to hold his place at McCombs, he finally decided to withdraw from the Haas wait list and commit to a sure thing. He was increasingly happy with McCombs as he met his future classmates and weighed the significant financial benefits of in-state tuition.

If you do apply to a range of schools, make sure each is a good fit and that your excitement, level of research and passion for the program comes through in your application regardless of whether it’s a safety school or not. The folks in the admissions committee have typically been at it long enough and can tell when an applicant has lukewarm feelings for them – and that’s the surest way your safe bet will become a bust.

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2014 Best Business Schools for Hispanics

HispanicBusiness recently announced the 2014 ranking of the best business schools for diversity practices. The rankings look at Hispanic graduate enrollment, full-time Hispanic faculty in the MBA programs, and the percent of MBA degrees earned …

HispanicBusiness recently announced the 2014 ranking of the best business schools for diversity practices. The rankings look at Hispanic graduate enrollment, full-time Hispanic faculty in the MBA programs, and the percent of MBA degrees earned by Hispanics.

According to the editors, enrollment is just one piece of the puzzle though. Some schools on this list do have relatively lower Hispanic enrollment rates than schools that didn’t make the list, but HispanicBusiness is also looking at faculty numbers and programs to attract and retain Hispanic students. The schools appearing on this list are well-rounded, say the editors, and have made notable efforts to engage the Hispanic community.

2014 Top Ten Best Business Schools for Hispanics

1. University of Texas at El Paso

Total graduate enrollment 275
Hispanic graduate enrollment 176
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 64.0%
Full-time MBA school faculty 60
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 16
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 26.7%

2. New York University Stern School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 786
Hispanic graduate enrollment 53
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 6.7%
Full-time MBA school faculty 177
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 6
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 3.4%

3. UT McCombs School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 511
Hispanic graduate enrollment 35
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 6.8%
Full-time MBA school faculty 95
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 4
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 4.2%

4. University of New Mexico Anderson School of Management

Total graduate enrollment 622
Hispanic graduate enrollment 224
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 36.0%
Full-time MBA school faculty 61
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 8
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 13.1%

5. Stanford Graduate School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 809
Hispanic graduate enrollment 44
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 5.4%
Full-time MBA school faculty 122
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 2
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 1.6%

6. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 497
Hispanic graduate enrollment 26
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 5.2%
Full-time MBA school faculty 81
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 3
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 3.7%

7. UV Darden School of Business

Total graduate enrollment 628
Hispanic graduate enrollment 31
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 4.9%
Full-time MBA school faculty 109
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 4
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 3.7%

8. University of Miami School of Business Administration

Total graduate enrollment 111
Hispanic graduate enrollment 22
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 19.8%
Full-time MBA school faculty 52
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 10
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 19.2%

9. Yale School of Management

Total graduate enrollment 552
Hispanic graduate enrollment 30
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 5.4%
Full-time MBA school faculty 68
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 2
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 2.9%

10. University of Texas at San Antonio College of Business

Total graduate enrollment 226
Hispanic graduate enrollment 41
Percent Hispanic graduate enrollment 18.1%
Full-time MBA school faculty 92
Full-time MBA school Hispanic faculty 11
Percent Hispanic faculty in MBA school 12.0%

Universities still have some work to do before the number of Hispanics at the graduate level corresponds to the size of the Hispanic population in this country, note the editors of HispanicBusiness, but the organization sees the trend both in student enrollment and full-time faculty moving in the right direction.

You may also be interested in:

The MBA Toolbox for Minority Applicants

B-Schools Seek to Shrink the Minority Faculty Gap

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US News Names 10 Most Expensive MBA Programs

In addition to its standard business school rankings released annually, US News and World Report occasionally releases a “short list” magnifying individual data points. This week, the news magazine takes a look at the ten …

In addition to its standard business school rankings released annually, US News and World Report occasionally releases a “short list” magnifying individual data points. This week, the news magazine takes a look at the ten most costly private MBA programs in the United States.

According to their research, average tuition fees for the 2013-2014 school year were roughly $62,000—an increase of $3,000 over the previous year and about $13,000 more than the average among all ranked schools.

Based on tuition and required fees for the 2013-2014 school year, here are the 10 most expensive private MBA programs in the United States:

  1. Harvard Business School
  2. University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School
  3. Dartmouth Tuck School of Business
  4. Columbia Business School
  5. MIT Sloan School of Management
  6. NYU Stern School of Business
  7. Chicago Booth School of Business
  8. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  9. Northwestern Kellogg School of Management
  10. Yale School of Management

As you can see, seven of the top 10 programs are on the East Coast, and just one—Stanford GSB—is out west. And despite their hefty price tag, applicants aren’t dissuaded a bit from targeting these schools. US News metrics indicate that five of them fall among the 10 b-schools where accepted students are likely to enroll.

You may also be interested in:

Assess 5 Funding Options to Help Pay for an MBA

Uncover the Hidden Costs of an MBA Education

MBA Rankings: Valuable Tool or a Distraction for Applicants?

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Forbes Names America’s Top Start-Up Universities

Forbes magazine recently announced its latest ranking of U.S. universities which produce the greatest number of entrepreneurs. Its methodology involved tallying the universities’ entrepreneurial ratio: the number of alumni and students who identify themselves as …

Forbes magazine recently announced its latest ranking of U.S. universities which produce the greatest number of entrepreneurs. Its methodology involved tallying the universities’ entrepreneurial ratio: the number of alumni and students who identify themselves as founders and business owners on LinkedIn, compared to the school’s total student body—undergraduate and graduate combined.

Top Ten Entrepreneurial Universities

  1. Stanford University
  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  3. University of California, Berkeley
  4. Cornell University
  5. University of California, Los Angeles
  6. California Institute of Technology
  7. Brown University
  8. Princeton University
  9. Pepperdine University
  10. Dartmouth College

While Stanford takes the top spot, that is due partly because the school was recognized for its famous dropouts such as Google’s Larry Page and Sergey Brin; Yahoo’s Jerry Yang and David Filo; and Snapchat’s Evan Spiegel.

The MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition helped land that school in the spotlight, having led to the creation of more than 130 companies and 2,500 jobs, according to Forbes.

The article hits newsstands on August 18th. Meanwhile, see the complete list of the top 50 start-up schools by following the link above.

You may also be interested in:

B-school opens doors to entrepreneurship, new survey shows

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Comparing Regional MBAs With Big-Name B-Schools

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com While much of my MBA consulting work is with clients who aspire to attend one of the top business schools, focusing solely on …

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com

While much of my MBA consulting work is with clients who aspire to attend one of the top business schools, focusing solely on the top ten programs is not the best choice for every aspiring MBA student.

If investment banking or management consulting is your dream career path, then stick with the sterling b-school brands. If you’re looking to switch careers, a top-tier program will get you there faster. If you’re a young applicant with only a few years of work experience, then the nationally or internationally respected name brand will help open those crucial first doors.

However, if you’re in your 30s and have a solid work history of increasing leadership positions, future employers in every industry outside of banking and consulting will judge you more on your professional experience than on whether your MBA is from a top 30 or top 10 school.

Research from the American Journal of Business Education shows that a significant percentage of regional MBAs have different MBA-related goals. These applicants are often older, have more work experience and are more interested in what they can learn to improve themselves with their current employer rather than trying to reposition or advance themselves in the market.

The motivation for choosing a particular region may be personal, such as wanting to stay near family, or professional, if your preferred industry is heavily represented in the area. That means if you want to work in entertainment, focus on the top schools in Southern California. If you want to work in a high-tech field, look at your options in the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle and Austin.

For nonprofit or government jobs, your best bet is the District of Columbia. If the energy sector is your calling, there are several good options in Texas, Louisiana, and North Carolina. In other words, don’t seek out a regional school in the Northeast if your ultimate goal is to end up in Los Angeles.

Keep in mind that a school that places 40 in a national or international ranking may be perceived as a top five school by the local business community. Therefore, if you want to work in a particular geographic region, it makes sense to choose the best school in that region. Local companies can have strong connections with their nearby universities and recruit locally, making it easier to network and conduct a job hunt when you’re already right where you want to end up.

Another plus is that regional business schools are often less expensive than their showier counterparts. Tuition and fees for 2014-2015 at Tulane University Freeman school’s full-time MBA program in New Orleans runs about $53,000.  In Texas, the Rice University Jones MBA tuition tops $50,000 a year.

Harvard Business School, meanwhile, charges nearly $59,000 for the full-time MBA Class of 2016, and Stanford Graduate School of Business estimates full-time tuition at a whopping $61,875 per year.

Regional schools might also offer more scholarship incentives, which would make your return on investment come much faster. Or, if you plan to continue working while you study in an evening MBA program, your employer might be willing to foot the bill due to tax advantages.

Whether your decision to pursue an MBA at a regional school is based primarily on financial, academic or geographic reasons, make sure you also look closely at fit. Visit the school, sit in on a class and talk to current students and alums.

If you don’t feel a genuine connection with the people in the program, the professors or the classes, it’s going to be much harder to have a positive b-school experience. Choose wisely and you may find that your regional MBA program goes toe-to-toe with the best of the big league players.

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