Tag Archives: Rankings

Forbes Announces Top MBA Rankings

Forbes has just released its biennial ranking of full-time MBA programs, with a methodology based solely on return on investment (ROI). Forbes compared the earnings of MBA grads in their first five years out of …

Forbes has just released its biennial ranking of full-time MBA programs, with a methodology based solely on return on investment (ROI). Forbes compared the earnings of MBA grads in their first five years out of business school to their opportunity cost (two years of forgone compensation, tuition and required fees) to arrive at a “5-year M.B.A. Gain.”

Surveys went out to 17,000 alumni from 100 schools, and Forbes heard back from 27% of those grads. Salaries five years out of school were down from two years ago for all but two schools in the top 10, Forbes reports, with only Stanford Graduate School of Business and Michigan’s Ross School of Business bucking the trend.

Here’s a snapshot of the best-ranked programs, which compares salaries pre- and post-MBA:

Top 10 Best U.S. MBA Programs

1. Stanford Graduate School of Business

5-year MBA gain: $99,700
Pre-MBA salary: $80,000
2012 salary: $221,000

2. Chicago Booth School of Business

5-year MBA gain: $92,600
Pre-MBA salary: $76,000
2012 salary: $200,000

3. Harvard Business School

5-year MBA gain: $79,600
Pre-MBA salary: $80,000
2012 salary: $205,000

4. University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School

5-year MBA gain: $74,400
Pre-MBA salary: $80,000
2012 salary: $205,000

5. Northwestern Kellogg School of Management

5-year MBA gain: $73,100
Pre-MBA salary: $73,000
2012 salary: $176,000

6. Dartmouth Tuck School of Business

5-year MBA gain: $71,000
Pre-MBA salary: $72,000
2012 salary: $189,000

7. Columbia Business School

5-year MBA gain: $70,200
Pre-MBA salary: $74,000
2012 salary: $192,000

8. Duke Fuqua School of Business

5-year MBA gain: $69,800
Pre-MBA salary: $63,000
2012 salary: $152,000

9. Cornell Johnson School of Management

5-year MBA gain: $68,100
Pre-MBA salary: $59,000
2012 salary: $155,000

10. Michigan Ross School of Business

5-year MBA gain: $68,000
Pre-MBA salary: $61,000
2012 salary: $153,000

Forbes editor Kurt Badenhausen tells Poets & Quants that an MBA pays off very quickly, particularly at the top schools, though the average payback for the Class of 2008 was 3.7 years, versus 2.7 years a decade ago.

“Graduates often see their salaries triple coming out of school,” he says. “This year’s data will tell an interesting story because these top schools are sending so many MBAs into consulting that their ROIs are fantastic. This year, with the shift in job placement, we’ll see a slowdown in that salary growth.”

For more on this story, read the complete 2013 Forbes MBA rankings.

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Which B-Schools are Social Media Savvy?

Are you at all surprised that Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business boast the strongest performance in MBA50′s 2013 US B-School Social Media Ranking? According to the results presented by chief editor …

Are you at all surprised that Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business boast the strongest performance in MBA50′s 2013 US B-School Social Media Ranking? According to the results presented by chief editor of MBA50 Matt Symonds, HBS leads the pack on Facebook and Linkedin, while Stanford GSB attracts the biggest following on Twitter and You Tube.

In fact, the data gathered shows these two schools are way ahead of other elite American MBA programs, and Symonds calls the difference between the top 5 and top 25 striking, noting that “many business schools have been slow to embrace social media, particularly in the way they market themselves.”

Top Five in Twitter Followers

  1. Stanford GSB (113,560)
  2. HBS (67,811)
  3. UPenn Wharton School (63,670)
  4. MIT Sloan School of Management (40,943)
  5. Georgetown McDonough (39,214)

Top Five in Facebook Likes

  1. HBS (121,678)
  2. UV Darden School of Business (71,850)
  3. Stanford GSB (71,662)
  4. Wharton (37,285)
  5. MIT Sloan (25,061)

Top Five in LinkedIn Followers

  1. HBS (32,670)
  2. Wharton (18,523)
  3. Stanford GSB (11,991)
  4. UV Darden (8,533)
  5. MIT Sloan (7,878)

Top Five in YouTube Subscribers

  1. Stanford GSB (53,797)
  2. HBS (32,436)
  3. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business (7,863)
  4. Columbia Business School (7,052)
  5. Wharton (6,070)

As the numbers show, the difference between first and fifth in each category is stark, indicating that today’s business schools need to significantly ramp up their social media participation if they hope to land the attention of this generation of tech-native consumers.

Today’s students don’t see social media as a trend; rather, this is a generation that has grown up with the Internet. Business schools, like any enterprise, need to adapt and evolve to this new reality in order to prepare graduates who can develop and manage marketing strategies that address the nuances of the online world.

You may also be interested in:

Give Yourself a Social Media Makeover as a B-School Applicant

Social Media Influences Curricula, Affects Applicants

 

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Look Beyond the Top Business Schools for Your MBA

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com People typically pursue an MBA because they are looking to improve their career opportunities and increase their future income. What some applicants don’t …

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com

People typically pursue an MBA because they are looking to improve their career opportunities and increase their future income. What some applicants don’t consider is that you can achieve both of those objectives even if you don’t make it into the business programs at Harvard, Wharton or Stanford.

While rankings are a valuable piece of the puzzle when you’re narrowing down your school list, don’t get hung up on the top few programs. It’s more important to be pragmatic and align your expectations with the MBA programs that match your particular profile, particularly if your GMAT score isn’t through the roof or your career trajectory has stalled out.

MBA programs update their career or recruiting reports annually and post them online, so a good strategy is to think about the company or industry you want to work in, and find out whether they recruit at your target schools.

[Research b-schools that match your learning style and personality.]

For example, top MBA employers including McKinsey & Co., Goldman Sachs, Boston Consulting Group, Bain & Co. and Deloitte Consulting recruit heavily at the most elite schools. But they also recruit other schools, such as at UCLA Anderson School of Management, Emory’s Goizueta Business School and Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business. These graduate business schools all placed in the Top 25 of the 2014 U.S. News Best Graduate Schools rankings.

While most schools don’t disclose the number of hires per company, MBA applicants can extrapolate that you might not need to get into a top school in order to land at the company of your dreams.

A few years ago, our client Priya had her sights set on attending one of the top three ranked schools in the U.S. However, as her consultant worked with her on her applications, it became apparent that her chances of admission were less than ideal.

Priya had taken a few swings at the GMAT, but test-taking was a significant weakness for her and her scores topped out at 640. She had a few years of work experience, but promotion freezes had left her stuck at her initial position without advancement.

[Find out how to fix a low GMAT score.]

Priya was starting to wonder if she should apply to business school at all. Before letting her quit, Priya’s consultant asked why she wanted to apply to those top three schools.

Priya wanted to work in corporate finance at a specific Fortune 500 firm after graduating, and had chosen the top schools where that company heavily recruited. With her career goal in mind, Priya and her consultant decided to change strategies.

Since an MBA was the key to achieving her career goals, Priya cast a wider net to include schools ranked in the top 50. She also retooled her application to emphasize her specific, concrete career plan, which helped shift focus away from her weaknesses.

Priya found a great fit in the University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School. Though not as competitive for admission as the very top schools, it ranks No. 20 in the U.S. News rankings and in the top twenty of several other lists, and offers a concentration in corporate finance that Priya found appealing.

She maximized her academic and networking opportunities while on campus and found a job with her chosen finance firm after graduating using the skills and contacts she gained, rather than relying solely on recruiting. Priya is now moving up the ranks and is encouraged by the fact that her firm’s CEO obtained his MBA from a school that rarely even appears on a business school ranking list.

[Get MBA admissions tips for applicants with a finance background.]

Location is often overlooked by candidates choosing a b-school, but is extremely important. Recruiters give priority to candidates who have already lived or worked in the same region where the position is located, and graduates tend to gain employment near the geographic location of their MBA program.

While an MBA from Harvard opens doors anywhere, if you’re interested in working in the energy sector, you might have a better shot going where the energy industry thrives. Examples in the oil and gas industry include the University of Texas—Austin McCombs School of Business or Rice University’s Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business.

Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business offers an MBA concentration in energy & environment, as well as a new concentration in energy finance.

The point is, if you’re not going into finance or consulting, you have greater flexibility in finding a niche program that’s the right fit for you.

While a degree from an elite business school is a goal and dream for many, several factors – such as test scores, undergraduate academic performance and tuition costs – influence whether it’s a viable option. If you believe the degree is critical to your career goals, consider expanding your school options while still getting a great return on investment.

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Best B-Schools for Entrepreneurship

Last week, The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur magazine announced the results of their annual survey of the top entrepreneurship programs in the nation. These are the programs that offer a broad range of courses in …

Last week, The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur magazine announced the results of their annual survey of the top entrepreneurship programs in the nation. These are the programs that offer a broad range of courses in entrepreneurship, as well as  significant opportunities for networking with established entrepreneurs, launching start-ups, and developing the skills needed to start successful businesses.

“Our annual ranking provides current and potential entrepreneurs with an overview of the best programs out there that will help cultivate their passions,” says Amy Cosper, VP and editor in chief of Entrepreneur magazine.

Babson College in Massachusetts earned the #1 spot on the undergraduate entrepreneurship program list for the second consecutive year, and it ranked #2 on the graduate program list. Meanwhile, the University of Michigan finished #1 on the graduate program list, up from #2 in 2012.

“We have created a culture at Ross where entrepreneurship is a major focus of our curriculum and a core value,” says Alison Davis-Blake, dean of the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, in a statement.

Stewart Thornhill, executive director of the school’s Samuel Zell & Robert H. Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies, calls the ranking a badge of honor as well as an endorsement of Ross’s unique methodology. “We do it through a matrix of multidisciplinary coursework, action-based learning, staff and faculty seminars, and alumni networking,” he explains.

Top 10 Graduate Schools for Entrepreneurship Programs

  1. University of Michigan Ross School of Business
  2. Babson College
  3. Harvard Business School
  4. Rice University
  5. University of Virginia Darden School of Business
  6. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  7. UT McCombs School of Business
  8. Brigham Young University
  9. UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School
  10. USC Marshall School of Business

This year’s roster includes several schools that made the top entrepreneurship program lists for the first time, including Harvard University, George Washington University (#25-graduate list), New York University (#24-graduate list), and Stanford University (#7-undergraduate list and #6-graduate list).

The Princeton Review conducted its survey for this project from April through June 2013. From more than 2,000 schools that The Princeton Review solicited data for this project, 39 institutions’ undergraduate and/or graduate programs made it to the final list.

The survey asked school administrators 60 questions covering: their schools’ levels of commitment to entrepreneurship inside and outside the classroom, the percentage of faculty, students, and alumni actively and successfully involved in entrepreneurial endeavors, and the number and reach of their mentorship programs.

Schools also provided information about their scholarships and grants for entrepreneurial studies and projects, and their support for school-sponsored business plan competitions. In all, over 30 data points were analyzed to tally the final list of top ranking programs and schools.

“The opportunity to expand a skillset or network with business influentials can launch a career forward or infuse new perspectives into a company’s growth strategy,” says Cosper. “The competitive edge these institutions provide is reason enough to see their value, no matter how untraditional the entrepreneurial pursuit may be.”

The Princeton Review has partnered with Entrepreneur Media Inc. on this annual project since 2006. Only schools that participate in The Princeton Review survey for this project are eligible for consideration for the ranking lists.

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Smith School Appoints New Dean with Global Outlook

The University of Maryland announced today that it has appointed Alexander J. Triantis as dean of the Robert H. Smith School of Business. Triantis, who has been with the Smith School for 17 years and …

new dean at Smith School

The University of Maryland announced today that it has appointed Alexander J. Triantis as dean of the Robert H. Smith School of Business. Triantis, who has been with the Smith School for 17 years and is currently a professor of finance, succeeds G. “Anand” Anandalingam and assumes his new role Sept. 1, 2013.

Dean Triantis will build on the Smith School’s advances in student experience, alumni engagement, and connections with business leaders, policymakers and the media. The Smith School’s MBA program is currently recognized as No. 24 among business schools nationwide in the most recent Bloomberg BusinessWeek rankings — which also rated the school No. 2 in student satisfaction, career services and teaching.

Triantis joined the Smith School faculty in 1996 and served as chair of the department of finance from 2006-2011. Under his leadership, the Smith School launched a master’s degree program in finance, innovative undergraduate fellows programs, and the groundbreaking Center for Financial Policy, which connects faculty with Washington policymakers to leverage the impact of faculty research on important financial policy issues.

Prior to joining the Smith School, he was an assistant and associate professor at the University of Wisconsin and a visiting scholar at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

“I am very honored to be appointed to this role,” says Triantis. “The Smith School already has strong momentum with exceptional faculty intellectual capital, leading centers of excellence, and diverse, creative and entrepreneurial students. I’m excited to have the opportunity to work in a new way with Smith’s outstanding community of faculty, students, alumni and staff to help the school reach its full potential as a world leader in business education.”

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FT’s 2012 Ranking of European Business Schools

Earlier this week, the Financial Times released its ninth annual ranking of the best European business schools. In a major upset, Spain’s IE Business School unseated HEC Paris, which had occupied the top slot for …

Earlier this week, the Financial Times released its ninth annual ranking of the best European business schools. In a major upset, Spain’s IE Business School unseated HEC Paris, which had occupied the top slot for the previous six years.

The ranking assesses the combined performance of Europe’s leading schools over four FT rankings in 2012: full-time MBA, executive MBA, masters in management, and non-degree executive education programs.

The Financial Times’ top 10 European schools are:

1. IE Business School
2. HEC Paris
3. London Business School
4. INSEAD
5. ESADE
6. IESE
7. IMD
8. University of Saint Gallen
9. Rotterdam School of Management
10. ESCP Europe

Both quality and quantity are required to reach the top, FT explains, noting that IE Business School is now included in all five rankings, having participated in the master in management ranking for the first time in 2012.

Though HEC Paris performed well across all five rankings, it received only a third of the program score due to the fact that its score in the EMBA ranking is reduced by two-thirds since it is part of the Trium joint program with NYU Stern School of Business and London School of Economics. In effect, writes the FT, HEC’s 4.33 programs lost out to IE’s five programs.

For more details on the rankings, including the strength of business education by country, see the complete 2012 Financial Times European business school rankings.

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