Tag Archives: Stanford Graduate School of Business

Stanford GSB Announces Fall 2018 MBA Application Deadlines

The Stanford Graduate School of Business has published the following MBA application deadlines for the 2017-2018 admissions season. Round 1 Application Deadline: September 19, 2017 Notification Date: December 14, 2017 Round 2 Application Deadline: January 10, …

Stanford GSB application deadlinesThe Stanford Graduate School of Business has published the following MBA application deadlines for the 2017-2018 admissions season.

Round 1
Application Deadline: September 19, 2017
Notification Date: December 14, 2017

Round 2
Application Deadline: January 10, 2018
Notification Date: March 29, 2018

Round 3
Application Deadline: April 4, 2018
Notification Date: Mid May 2018

Candidates should note that all materials must be submitted by 10 a.m. Pacific Time on the day of the deadline to be considered for that round. The application will go live in June. For more information, please visit the Stanford GSB admissions website.

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Is There Such Thing as Too Old, Too Young for an MBA?

The profile of the typical business school applicant has changed significantly over the past decade. Once upon a time, few would contemplate applying without first having the requisite 5 to 7 years of work experience …

Many prospective business school students confront whether now is the right time to get an MBA.

The profile of the typical business school applicant has changed significantly over the past decade. Once upon a time, few would contemplate applying without first having the requisite 5 to 7 years of work experience under their belts. The prevailing wisdom held that older candidates would have more to contribute to class discussions because of their substantial real-world experience.

Flash forward to today and you’ll see schools taking a closer look at younger candidates, including those with no work experience. The reason for this shift is that business schools fear some applicants would attain so much success after only a few years that they would not want to go back for an MBA.

Some candidates really are ready for business school right after graduating from college; some have started a company while in school, played a strong role in a family business, or gained relevant experiences in other areas.

But as more MBA programs welcome younger applicants, and in some cases actively court them with programs geared toward younger students—such as Harvard Business School‘s 2+2 Program, Yale School of Management‘s three-year Silver Scholars M.B.A. Program, and the deferred enrollment option for college seniors offered by the Stanford Graduate School of Business—anyone over age 28 may feel that she or he doesn’t stand a chance of getting in.

When a client asks, “Am I too old (or too young) for an MBA?” I respond that it’s not about chronological age. It’s more about maturity, readiness, and where you are in your career. Sometimes these things can be linked to age, but that’s not a certainty.

Instead, think about what you want to gain from and what you can contribute to an MBA program. You may be 22 but have a ton of insight to share and highly focused career goals. That would give you a leg up on the 28-year-old who is lost and just using the MBA as something to fill the time.

While older candidates do face certain obstacles, these applicants get into the top programs every year, and can and should apply if an MBA is the necessary stepping stone to advance their career. If you’re contemplating business school in your mid-30s, the key is to demonstrate confidence, how you’ve progressed professionally, and what you’ve contributed on the job.

A 38-year-old candidate who has spent more than a decade in the same position without showing progression will have a hard time being admitted to a top MBA program. This is not because of age. Rather, it is because the candidate may not demonstrated growth during that time.

If you’re applying to an elite school like Harvard, which values great leadership, you should’ve already developed terrific leadership skills. Many people with great leadership skills have achieved so much by the time they near 40 that they’re not interested in going back to school.

However, if one of these people is interested and can demonstrate great achievement balanced with a legitimate need or desire to return to school, then they have a good chance. Proving that you are a strong and accomplished 40-year-old leader, and balancing that with the fact that you want to improve in order to get to the next step, is tough to pull off. That said, “old” people are admitted every season!

Younger applicants, meanwhile, have their own set of obstacles to overcome. They’ll need to demonstrate to the admissions committee that they have the focus and maturity required to succeed in an MBA program.

Since a huge part of the b-school classroom experience is the exchange of ideas from diverse individuals, younger candidates will also need to prove that they have enough life experience to contribute to an incoming class. Business schools are looking for authentic experience, not just students who subscribe to the Wall Street Journal. Finally, younger applicants will need to show an admissions team they have a strong reason for returning to school so soon after graduation.

Regardless of whether you are young or old, if you can achieve what is written above, you will have a good chance of getting into a program that is the right fit for you. Your age should never be the sole deciding factor of whether to apply to business school.

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Stanford GSB Names New Asst. Dean of MBA Admissions

The Stanford Graduate School of Business has named Kirsten Moss as the new Assistant Dean and Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. In this role, Moss will oversee and manage Stanford GSB’s admissions and financial …

The Stanford Graduate School of Business has named Kirsten Moss as the new Assistant Dean and Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. In this role, Moss will oversee and manage Stanford GSB’s admissions and financial aid team and map out a vision for reaching, recruiting and selecting top MBA candidates.

Moss previously served in several roles within the Stanford GSB MBA Admissions team, including Director of MBA Admissions and Associate Director of Evaluation. During her tenure, Moss managed the evaluation, marketing and operations teams and developed a new approach to assessing leadership capability.

Prior to joining Stanford GSB, Moss worked at Harvard Business School as Managing Director, MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. Moss has also held positions in corporate consulting and finance.

“Kirsten has deep experience in admissions and leadership talent evaluation both inside and outside Stanford GSB,” says Senior Academic Dean Yossi Feinberg, who chaired the selection process. “Throughout our search process, Kirsten demonstrated her expertise and commitment to helping Stanford GSB continue to attract and develop the future leaders of tomorrow. I have every confidence that Kirsten will continue the MBA’s strong trajectory.”

Moss succeeds Derrick Bolton, who served as Assistant Dean for MBA Admissions and Financial Aid for 15 years before accepting a new position in September 2016 as Dean of Admissions for Stanford’s Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program.

“Kirsten has a strong understanding of our school’s vision and immediately impressed us with her ideas for connecting with the next generation of students making a positive, measurable difference in the world,” says Jonathan Levin, Philip H. Knight Professor and Dean of Stanford GSB. “Kirsten brings a wealth of knowledge and experience—from top-tier MBA admissions programs to business consulting—and will provide fresh insight as we achieve new levels of excellence.”

“Stanford GSB has a rich legacy of equipping students with the tools necessary to create change—individually, within organizations and throughout the world,” says Moss. “I’m thrilled to join the team in this new capacity as we work together to cultivate the next generation of leaders poised to make an impact.”

Moss earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University, an MBA from Harvard Business School, and is currently pursuing a Doctorate of Psychology from William James College.

Moss’s appointment will begin June 1.

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US News Announces 2018 Ranking of Best Business Schools

U.S. News & World Report has released the 2018 Best Graduate Schools rankings, designed to help prospective students research programs across six disciplines and evaluate the potential return on their investment. In this year’s full-time MBA rankings, …

U.S. News & World Report has released the 2018 Best Graduate Schools rankings, designed to help prospective students research programs across six disciplines and evaluate the potential return on their investment.

Harvard Business School interview

In this year’s full-time MBA rankings, Harvard Business School and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School have tied for the No. 1 program in the country. The University of Chicago Booth School of Business holds the No. 3 spot, and the Stanford Graduate School of Business drops from last year’s second place to share fourth place with MIT Sloan School of Management and Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management.

Among part-time MBA programs, the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business once again retains the top spot, followed by Chicago’s Booth School of Business at No. 2. The NYU Stern School of Business and UCLA Anderson School of Management tie at third place.

US News’s Best Business Schools

  • Harvard Business School (#1 tie)
  • Wharton School (#1 tie)
  • Chicago Booth School of Business (#3)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business (#4 tie)
  • MIT Sloan School of Management (#4 tie)
  • Kellogg School of Management (#4 tie)
  • UC Berkeley Haas School of Business (#7)
  • Tuck School of Business (#8)
  • Columbia Business School (#9 tie)
  • Yale School of Management  (#9 tie)

The six graduate disciplines U.S. News ranks annually are evaluated on factors such as employment rates for graduates, starting salary and standardized test scores of newly enrolled students. Because each graduate program is different, the rankings methodology varies across disciplines.

Different output measures are available for different fields, U.S. News explains, saying that in business, they use starting salaries and the ability of new MBAs to find jobs upon graduation or three months later.

“A graduate degree can lead to professional advancement and a potential salary increase,” says Anita Narayan, managing editor of Education at U.S. News. “Whether you are interested in pursuing a full-time program or taking classes part-time, the grad school rankings and advice offer guidance on finding programs that help you fulfill your personal goals.”

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Meet Madhav Rajan, New Dean of Chicago Booth

The Chicago Booth School of Business announced today that Madhav Rajan, former senior associate dean at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, has been appointed the next dean, effective July 1, 2017. Rajan served as senior …

Chicago Booth Dean Madhav RajanThe Chicago Booth School of Business announced today that Madhav Rajan, former senior associate dean at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, has been appointed the next dean, effective July 1, 2017.

Rajan served as senior associate dean for academic affairs at the Stanford GSB from 2010 to 2016. That role included leadership of Stanford’s MBA program, with oversight of admissions, curriculum, the student experience and career management. He launched new joint-degree programs with Stanford’s engineering school and rolled out initiatives for tighter integration with the rest of the university.

“We sought the most outstanding candidate whose values, ambition and abilities fully comport with the distinctiveness of Chicago Booth as one of methodological rigor in its research and education, and through that commitment one of high impact on the world,” President Robert J. Zimmer and Provost Daniel Diermeier wrote in announcing the appointment. “We are confident that Madhav will be an outstanding leader for Chicago Booth in the coming years.”

“The values I have in research and education are deeply valued at Chicago Booth,” Rajan said. “People come here to do rigorous, empirically based research and analysis, which provides the basis for a transformative student experience and an extremely effective MBA curriculum. We have an exciting opportunity to take Booth’s deep strengths and leverage them here and around the world. I am thrilled to have the chance to be dean at what is unquestionably the greatest academic business school.”

Rajan’s primary research interest is the economics-based analysis of management accounting issues, especially as they relate to the choice of internal control and performance systems in firms. He served as editor of The Accounting Review from 2002 to 2008 and is co-author of Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis, the leading cost accounting textbook used around the world.

In 2000, Rajan won the David W. Hauck Award, the highest undergraduate teaching award at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. This April he will receive the Robert T. Davis Award for lifetime service and achievement, the highest faculty recognition awarded by the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Rajan completed his bachelor’s degree at the University of Madras, India. He holds a PhD and two master’s degrees from Carnegie Mellon University. Before going to Stanford in 2001, Rajan held faculty positions at the Wharton School. He held a visiting professorship at Chicago Booth in 2007-08.

Rajan succeeds former Dean Sunil Kumar, who was named provost of Johns Hopkins University in July 2016. His appointment follows a national search informed by a Booth faculty committee.

Image courtesy of Stanford Graduate School of Business

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Six Steps to Acing Your Stanford GSB Interview

If you’ve made it to the interview stage at the Stanford Graduate School of Business (GSB), congratulations are in order. As I explained in my recent article published in Business Insider, the school has the most …

Stanford GSB interview tipsIf you’ve made it to the interview stage at the Stanford Graduate School of Business (GSB), congratulations are in order. As I explained in my recent article published in Business Insider, the school has the most competitive admission stats in the world, and with only an eight percent admissions rate, receiving an invite proves that Stanford already considers you an exceptionally strong candidate.

Arguably more than any other program, Stanford looks for applicants who have formulated a worldview and understand who they are and what matters most to them. According to admissions officers, Stanford seeks out candidates who have “excelled by doing ordinary things extraordinarily well.”

While you can never know exactly which specific questions you will encounter during your interview, you can anticipate that the types of questions will fall into one of the following categories representing the key attributes that Stanford values: intellectual vitality, demonstrated leadership potential, and personal qualities and contributions.

As you prepare for the interview, focus on the life experiences, anecdotes, and answers that will showcase your strengths in six specific areas. Wondering just what those areas are? Click on over to Business Insider to continue reading my article with the best GSB interview tips, and you’ll learn exactly how to successfully wow your interviewer for a shot of admission at this ultra-elite school.

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