Tag Archives: Tuck School of Business

Tuck School Does Some Myth-Busting for Military Applicants

Current and former members of the armed forces possess numerous skills that admissions boards value in an MBA candidate. Real-world leadership experience, the ability to strategize and think on their feet, and being able to …

Tuck school welcomes military veteransCurrent and former members of the armed forces possess numerous skills that admissions boards value in an MBA candidate. Real-world leadership experience, the ability to strategize and think on their feet, and being able to work well under high-pressure situations are just a few of the advantages a veteran brings to the table when applying for business school.

Coming from the armed forces rather than a civilian career path prior to business school can give rise to certain challenges when drafting an application, but it’s important to keep those concerns in perspective.  The Tuck 360 MBA Blog at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business has recently published a post dispelling some common myths for military applicants just in time for its upcoming Military Visit Day on May 1, 2017.

“The thought of applying to an MBA program and separating from the military can be intimidating, says Jarett Berke, a second-year Tuck student and a former USMC pilot.

“For years, we have had a steady paycheck backed by the U.S. Government, where layoffs were improbable and pay raises and promotions happened on a schedule,” he explains. “We’ve established ourselves within our respective communities, and our families have developed close relationships with others in our commands, squadrons, or platoons.”

With that in mind, Berke addresses eight common myths on the minds of prospective veteran students. Here’s an overview of his advice, but definitely check out Berke’s article through the link above for more details.

Myth: Being older puts you at a disadvantage. The maturity, experience, and poise that often comes with age are a major benefit to your classmates and the school. If anything, I would say that being older is actually an advantage.   

Myth: My partner won’t be able to find a job. Unemployment in the area last year got down to 1.9%, and there is no shortage of really interesting companies. Many partners end up working for Tuck, Dartmouth, or the hospital, and there are scores of very successful small businesses always in need to high quality people. 

Myth: My GMAT score is the most important part of my application. Wrong. The GMAT is just one piece of the puzzle, and you should think of it as a hurdle. Ultimately, the Admissions department looks at the whole person, including: experience, essays, interview, GPA, GMAT (or GRE), and career goals. Make sure you focus on all aspects of your candidacy, not just the GMAT.

Myth: A part-time MBA is equally valuable. Part-time or “executive” MBAs are great for people who want to take the next step in a career they ARE ALREADY IN. If you are pivoting (like all veterans), a top-tier full-time MBA puts you in a different population. You become an MBA with a military background, not a military person with an MBA. This may sound trivial, but it makes a big difference to employers. Plus, taking two years to focus on yourself is an opportunity you may never have again.

Myth: Vets don’t add much value to study groups. Military officers spend their careers making important decisions with limited information. We figure stuff out. We are quick learners, and we can get things done. The courses in business school go deep on a range of topics, and while there may be a few topics that someone in your group has experience in, the majority of the curriculum is new to everyone. Your ability to learn quickly, figure things out, and communicate effectively make you VERY valuable to the teams you are a part of.

An MBA is a great next step for transitioning veterans no matter what branch of service they come from. Applicants from the military should know that business school admissions teams highly value their experience, so if that’s your background, make sure your  applications highlight those powerful and unique qualities.

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Hosted by the Armed Forces Alumni Association (AFAA), Tuck Military Visit Day, themed “Setting You Up for Success,” will be Monday, May 1, 2017. During the event, you’ll get a chance to see what distinguishes Tuck among top-tier business schools and what you need to know to transition from the military into the right MBA program. Register here.

You may also be interested in:

Overcome 3 MBA Application Challenges Facing Military Veterans

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Tuesday Tips: Dartmouth Tuck Fall 2017 MBA Essay Tips

The Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important …

Tuck School MBA essay tipsThe Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important to consistently show how you will fit into the school values of leadership, teamwork and collaboration and bring your own unique qualities and experiences to the community. This revised set of essays focuses on global approach as a significant value as well.

The Tuck admissions blog offers the following advice: “There are no right or wrong answers. We encourage applicants to limit the length of their responses to 500 to 700 words for Essay #1 and 500 words for Essay #2. Please double-space your responses.”

Stacy Blackman Consulting has worked with many successful Tuck applicants, contact us to learn more about the customized assistance we can provide for your application.

Essay One (Required): Tuck educates wise leaders who better the world of business. What are your short- and long-term goals? How will a Tuck MBA enable you to become a wise leader with global impact?

Tuck has updated the career goals essay to include a question about your global vision and impact on the world of business. Consistent with a standard MBA career goals essay you must also outline your short- and long-term career goals. Your short-term goals are the aspirations you have for your job immediately after graduation, while your long-term goals may be 10 or 20 years after you complete your MBA.

As you consider how you will make a global impact in your career, you should incorporate “Why Tuck” as a crucial element. Make sure you have researched the school’s programs and determined how your education will help you achieve your goals.

For example, Tuck has multiple global business programs, including a class where you can consult to an international company and short Global Insight Expeditions. By reaching out to current students and alumni you can learn more about the experiences and classes that would inform your development as a global leader.

Essay Two (Required): As a diverse and global community, our students arrive at the same place from many different paths. Tell us about an experience in which you have had to live, learn and/or work with other people very different from yourself. What challenges and/or opportunities did you experience, how did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result?

The new required Essay Two also seeks to understand your global awareness and ability to learn and grow from those with different backgrounds. This essay prompt is open ended and allows you to choose an example from work or from an extracurricular experience. Think broadly about your background and when you have expanded your world by interacting with someone very different.

A compelling narrative will demonstrate learning and growing through interacting with others. Think about a time when you were truly challenged by a person or group of people different from yourself, and how you resolved the experience.

What did you learn about yourself and others? Interacting with your Tuck classmates may challenge you in a similar way, and showing a growth mentality would be attractive to the admissions committee.

This essay is not only an opportunity to discuss your ability to learn from others, you can also show that you are a leader in the Tuck tradition. The Tuck School of Business definition of leadership is inherently collaborative. Team based experiences are preferable, and as you describe working with someone different from yourself you can likely work in a strong leadership example.

Essay Three (Optional): Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

This is your opportunity to discuss any perceived weaknesses in your application such as low GPA or gaps in your work experience. When approaching a question of this nature, focus on explanations rather than excuses and explain what you have done since the event you are explaining to demonstrate your academic ability or management potential.

You could potentially use this space to add something new that was not covered in the previous essays or in the application, resume or recommendations, however use your judgment about the topics as Tuck asks that you only complete this question if you “feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.”

Essay Four (Required from Reapplicants): How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally.

If you are re-applying to Tuck this essay is the place for you to showcase any developments since your last application. Ideally you have concrete improvements like a stronger GMAT score, grades from business classes, or a promotion. Even if nothing quantitative has changed in your profile you likely have developed more leadership activities or progressed in your job responsibilities.

If you are struggling to think of any clear improvements you can describe refined goals or deeper thinking about your future that has led you to apply again to Tuck. Demonstrating growth in maturity or introspection can be a huge improvement to your application and absolutely should be highlighted.

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Tuck School Fall 2017 MBA Essay Questions

Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business has previewed the updated MBA essay questions for the 2016-2017 admissions season this week on the Tuck 360 MBA Blog.  According to the school, these revised essays come in response to the …

Tuck School MBA essaysDartmouth’s Tuck School of Business has previewed the updated MBA essay questions for the 2016-2017 admissions season this week on the Tuck 360 MBA Blog.  According to the school, these revised essays come in response to the increasingly dynamic and diverse global economy, which necessitates values-driven leadership.

Per the Tuck MBA admissions team: Please respond fully but concisely to the following essay questions. There are no right or wrong answers. We encourage applicants to limit the length of their responses to 500 words for each essay. Please double-space your responses.

Essays

  1. (Required) Tuck educates wise leaders who better the world of business. What are your short- and long-term goals? How will a Tuck MBA enable you to become a wise leader with global impact?
  2. (Required) As a diverse and global community, our students arrive at the same place from many different paths.  Tell us about an experience in which you have had to live, learn and/or work with other people very different from yourself.  What challenges and/or opportunities did you experience, how did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result?
  3. (Optional) Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.
  4. (Required from Reapplicants) How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally.

The Fall 2017 application will go live soon, so please check with the Tuck School MBA admissions website for more information and details about the program.

You may also be interested in:

Tuck School of Business Fall 2017 Application Deadlines

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Maximize the ROI of Your B-School Decision: Are You Thinking Deep Enough?

With the high cost of admission to a top-tier business school, prospective students should determine whether pursuing the MBA degree makes financial sense as a long-term investment. I advise applicants to ask themselves three questions: …

ROI of the MBA

With the high cost of admission to a top-tier business school, prospective students should determine whether pursuing the MBA degree makes financial sense as a long-term investment. I advise applicants to ask themselves three questions: Will the degree help me switch careers? Can I expect a significant salary increase? Will an MBA help me reach a leadership position sooner?

While it can be daunting to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to earn an MBA, most business school graduates experience a substantial salary increase. The degree is also a powerful differentiator in a crowded marketplace. The vast majority of graduates report having greater job satisfaction and the ability to advance quickly and, therefore, earn more in shorter time.

In fact, Graduate Management Admission Council’s 2016 Alumni Perspectives survey gets very specific about the dollar value such a degree can bring. Business school alumni earn a median of US$2.5 million in cumulative base salary over 20 years following graduation. Alumni — on average — recoup their b-school investment within four years after graduation, depending on the type of program attended.

Last fall, when Forbes released its 2015 ranking of the best b-schools based on the ROI of the MBA Class of 2010, Stanford Graduate School of Business nudged out Harvard Business School for the top spot for the second straight time, with a five-year gain of $89,100 for graduates. In fact, according to the report, the class of 2010 tripled their pre-MBA total compensation to $255,000 five years out of school.

Calculating the return on investment requires a simple formula. It’s the return acquired from an investment minus the cost of the investment, divided by the cost of the investment. Students of two-year MBA programs typically have the largest investment expense because they miss two years of employment. They need to recoup the cost of the MBA degree plus the opportunity cost in order to get a positive return on their investment.

To dive deeper into the numbers, TransparentMBA, a company started in 2015 by University of Chicago Booth School of Business students who were frustrated by the lack of relevant compensation and satisfaction data available to MBA students, provides both industry and company-specific on effective hourly wage across a multitude of post-MBA roles.

This can greatly help those considering business school figure out just what type of salary bump they can look forward to based on the industry or company they plan to target upon graduating.

Prospective students should consider payback time with projected cumulative growth, and average growth rate, when looking at return on investment as a motivating factor for pursuing an MBA. But keep in mind, the value of the MBA degree varies depending on your post-graduation plans, as well as the brand of the business school where you earn the degree.

In an earlier post on ROI, Paul Danos, former dean of Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business, noted that while the elite programs require a significant investment in time and money, it pays off in both career options and compensation. “The top programs are able to recruit the best qualified students, provide a truly excellent educational experience, and therefore attract top recruiters who recognize the value of that experience.”

Remember, every choice that you make when deciding whether an MBA makes sense for you– ranging from the cost of the city you decide to live in, the field you move into, to the school you choose – will impact your financial return on investment.  Nevertheless, I believe that no other degree can open doors as the MBA does.

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Attention, Military MBA Applicants

Military MBA applicants tend to blow other candidates out of the water, figuratively speaking, because they have a wealth of experience to draw from at a very young age. In fact, my very first client, …

Military to MBAMilitary MBA applicants tend to blow other candidates out of the water, figuratively speaking, because they have a wealth of experience to draw from at a very young age. In fact, my very first client, many years ago, was in the military.

While many candidates can only speak to sitting in cubicles, crunching numbers for the boss, b-school applicants from the military have had to deal with highly stressful situations, think on their feet, make ethical decisions, and lead important projects.

If you have a military background, a great business school program to consider is that of Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business. The school is hosting a special event for future military applicants on April 18, 2016. The organizers of Tuck Military Visit Day have planned a full schedule of events to help set you up for success in your MBA application process.

There will be a chance to sit in on a class, as well as attend panels hosted by members of the admissions committee, current military students, the Career Development Office and the Financial Aid Office.

If you are planning to apply to the Tuck Class of 2019, you may schedule an admissions interview if you are ready. Military Visit Day kicks off at 7:30am Monday morning, but you can get things started early by joining members of Armed Forces Alumni Association on Sunday night, April 17th, for an informal social.

Registration for Tuck’s Military Visit Day is already open, and the admissions team and military MBA students of Tuck look forward to having you in Hanover.

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Tuck School Gets Real About Round Three

Everyone has an opinion about submitting your MBA application in Round 3—including us here at SBC—and a lot of the conversation circles around how competitive it is and how scarce spots are. While it may …

Tuck MBA advice

Everyone has an opinion about submitting your MBA application in Round 3—including us here at SBC—and a lot of the conversation circles around how competitive it is and how scarce spots are.

While it may seem only candidates who are also Olympic athletes, chess champions, or have scaled Mount Everest stand a chance, the reality is there is always a spot for a great applicant in the final round. That’s why the schools have one!

The MBA admissions blog at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business recently published a useful post on the realities of applying in Round 3, complete with anecdotes and advice from three recent graduates who applied in the April round (as it’s known at Tuck).

Key takeaways from the post include using the optional essay to explain why you waited until the final round; making sure you share something unique about yourself with the admissions committee that will differentiate your candidacy; and obviously, only applying when your application is as strong as it can possibly be.

The good news is that applicants in Tuck’s final round still have a shot at a scholarship, can join a pre-term program with everyone else, and can definitely get a room in the dorms because the housing lottery happens in June.

If things don’t work out this season, the Tuck admissions teams says, “Have a plan B. While you may not get the outcome you hope for, the process will no doubt teach you something about yourself and help guide your next steps.”

In our experience, Round 3 is far and away the most difficult round for MBA applicants. A lackluster application will most certainly find its way to the reject pile, so be strategic when deciding the best time to apply for you.

You may also be interested in:

Evaluate in Which Round to Submit Your B-School Application
Applying to Business School in Round 3
Round 3 Attracts Maverick Applicants

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