Tag Archives: Tuck School of Business

ROI of the MBA Strong Across Most Tiers

Just about everyone knows that earning an MBA degree offers an excellent return on investment. But what’s interesting to learn is that even schools outside of the Top 20 and without a globally recognized brand …

Just about everyone knows that earning an MBA degree offers an excellent return on investment. But what’s interesting to learn is that even schools outside of the Top 20 and without a globally recognized brand still offer degree-holders the chance to rake in a seven-figure income over a two-decade period.

PayScale, which collects salary data from individuals through online pay comparison tools, provided an analysis for Poets&Quants which revealed that the career and salary benefits extended far beyond top tier MBA programs.

Several schools offer a greater ROI than their ranking would suggest, Payscale determined. MBAs from Boston University, says P&Q’s editor in chief John A. Byrne as an example, earned enough money–$2,329,000–to put them at No. 19 on the list, even though his organization ranks BU’s full-time MBA program at 40.

Similarly, MBAs from UC-Irvine’s Merage Business School will earn an estimated $2,319,932 over the 20 years, putting Merage alums at No. 21 on the list, though the school’s MBA program is ranked at 47.

That’s not to say attending a top school isn’t really worth the hefty cost; far from it. The highly ranked, big-brand schools tend to deliver the highest earnings over a 20-year period, Byrne reports.

Harvard Business School’s MBAs come out on top, with median income of $3,233,000. Stanford MBA holders are next with $3,011,000, and Wharton comes in third with $2,989,000. Harvard MBAs, in fact, earned nearly twice as much as MBAs from Texas A&M’s Mays Business School, who pull in $1,781,820 over 20 years,” he notes.

The deans of two prominent business schools weigh in on the issue in Byrne’s story. Robert Bruner of the University of Virginia’s Darden School, isn’t surprised by the strong association between income potential and where you earn your MBA.

“There is a winners-take-all, self-reinforcing cycle in higher education: certain schools attract excellent student talent, which in turn attracts intense recruiter activity and high-salary offers. The employment results make it easier for those schools to attract excellent student talent…and the cycle continues,” Bruner says.

Paul Danos, dean of Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business, notes that while the elite programs require a significant investment in time and money, it pays off in both career options and compensation. “The top programs are able to recruit the best qualified students, provide a truly excellent educational experience, and therefore attract top recruiters who recognize the value of that experience.”

While industry choice, geographic location, and other factors ultimately influence ROI, those in management education are unanimous in their belief that no other degree can open doors as the MBA does.

““It is a transformative experience that enables an engineer to become a financier, a high school teacher to become a marketing executive, or an auditor to become a mergers and acquisition specialist for a top corporation, says Danos. “I know of no other educational experience that can match the total value proposition of a 2-year full time MBA.”

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Forbes Announces Top MBA Rankings

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Business Schools Respond to Market Demands

Technology and entrepreneurship are changing the face of management education, a story in Monday’s Chicago Tribune reports. Economic and social challenges require creative solutions, and business schools have found themselves rapidly adapting to address those …

Technology and entrepreneurship are changing the face of management education, a story in Monday’s Chicago Tribune reports. Economic and social challenges require creative solutions, and business schools have found themselves rapidly adapting to address those issues head-on.

To meet the needs of a volatile job market, many elite MBA programs have begun to shift away from case studies and quantitative models to place greater emphasis on experiential learning and degree concentrations so that graduates are ready to hit the ground running on Day 1.

The globalization of business requires a new generation of leadership that is able to comfortably navigate in various cultural contexts. To meet that challenge, more and more schools have made international projects a degree requirement, such as the new global insight program announced by Tuck School of Business last week.

For MBA applicants who already know what they want to do post-graduation, the one-year MBA is an option that has grown tremendously in the past couple of years.

Since Dean Sally Blount took the helm at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management in 2010, the school has refocused its energies to boost one-year MBA enrollment to keep pace with the global marketplace. However, this type of program is for students who aren’t looking to change careers, because it offers no internship.

Meanwhile, top MBA programs across the country are adding multiple courses in entrepreneurship to meet a growing demand, despite the fact that only an estimated five percent of graduates start their own company straight out of business school.

Ultimately, “Business school is all about constant change and improvement and response to the market,” Elissa Sangster, executive director of the Forte Foundation, a nonprofit consortium of companies and business schools supporting women’s access to business education, tells the Tribune. “It’s always good to look for the next thing to produce better future leaders.”

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The Case Method: Alive and Thriving or On its Way Out?

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Tuck School Creates New Global Insight Requirement

Beginning in fall 2015, students at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth will be required to complete an immersive global experience as part of their MBA education, the school announced earlier this week. The …

Tuck School of Business

Beginning in fall 2015, students at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth will be required to complete an immersive global experience as part of their MBA education, the school announced earlier this week. The new Tuck Global Insight Requirement, which goes into effect for the class of 2017, aims to ensure that every student at Tuck receives the global immersion they need to lead in today’s business environment.

“The world has become much more global,” says Phillip C. Stocken, associate dean for the MBA program at Tuck. “As a result, we believe our graduates must have a global business capability—a global mindset—to successfully navigate the different cultures, countries, and markets in which they will inevitably work. There is no better way to do this than spending time on the ground in another country.”

To satisfy the new requirement, students will choose from an array of carefully-designed, credit-bearing immersive courses that will provide them with the skills and knowledge required to solve problems effectively across cultures and lead in diverse business environments.

Each course will be faculty-led and include pre-travel orientation; an immersive experience in a country that is new to the student; and reflection. Like all MBA courses at Tuck, these will be academically rigorous and boast a high degree of faculty-student interaction. Qualifying courses currently include OnSite Global Consulting, a global First-Year Project, and Global Insight Expeditions.

The requirement extends to all MBA candidates what is already an integral part of the learning experience for a majority of students at Tuck. Nearly 67 percent of the class of 2014 reported spending time in a country that was new to them during their time at Tuck, and demand for such experiences is expected to grow in the future.

Matthew Slaughter, associate dean for faculty and the Signal Companies’ Professor of Management, says, “Making an immersive global experience a required part of the curriculum strengthens this commitment to ensure that every Tuck student receives outstanding preparation for the global leadership that businesses are today seeking.”

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Tuesday Tips: Tuck at Dartmouth MBA Essay Tips

The Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important …

The Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important to consistently show how you will fit into the school values of leadership, teamwork and collaboration and bring your own unique qualities and experiences to the community.

Before you begin the essays think about the areas you want to communicate to the Tuck Business School admissions committee. As you consider each topic be sure to provide specific examples to illustrate your unique qualities. Real life experiences are your best evidence of leadership qualities, teamwork skills and management potential.

Stacy Blackman Consulting has worked with successful Tuck applicants for over a decade, contact us to learn more about the customized assistance we can provide for your application.

Essay 1
Why is an MBA a critical next step toward your short- and long-term career goals? Why is Tuck the best MBA fit for you and your goals and why are you the best fit for Tuck?

This standard career goals question requires you to clearly outline your short- and long-term career goals. Your short-term goals are the aspirations you have for your job immediately after graduation, while your long-term goals may be 10 or 20 years after you complete your MBA. In this relatively short essay you will need to explain what you have been pursuing in your career thus far, and why you need an MBA at this point in your life, along with your career goals.

“Why Tuck Business School” is an important aspect to this essay, and your opportunity to demonstrate fit. Make sure you have researched the school’s programs and determined your education will suit your plans. By reaching out to current students and alumni you will gain crucial insights that will provide a personal perspective on the culture of the school.

Essay 2
Tell us about your most meaningful leadership experience and what role you played. What did you learn about your own individual strengths and weaknesses through this experience?

As you consider topics for this essay consider the situations that may have revealed your own strengths and weaknesses with clarity. Think back to Tuck Business School’s criteria, and consider using this essay to either demonstrate your interpersonal leadership skills or to show something from your background or experience that is unique. Think about the leadership opportunities that led to a deeper understanding of yourself and others, and may have resulted in definition of your strengths or an improvement in your weaknesses. The example you choose can be from work or community involvement, as “great leadership can be accomplished in the pursuit or business and societal goals.”

One aspect to consider as you draft this essay is that the Tuck School of Business definition of leadership is inherently collaborative. Team based experiences may be preferable, and as you describe your leadership experience, make sure you explain how you were able to inspire and enable others to accomplish as well.

Essay 3
Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

This is your opportunity to discuss any perceived weaknesses in your application such as low GPA or gaps in your work experience. When approaching a question of this nature, focus on explanations rather than excuses and explain what you have done since the event you are explaining to demonstrate your academic ability or management potential.

You could potentially use this space to add something new that was not covered in the previous essays or in the application, resume or recommendations, however use your judgment about the topics as Tuck asks that you only complete this question if you “feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.”

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Tuck School of Business 2014-2015 Essay Prompts

The Tuck 360 MBA Blog of Darmouth’s Tuck School of Business recently previewed the essay questions that will appear in the upcoming Class of 2017 application, which goes live later this summer. Essay 1 Why …

The Tuck 360 MBA Blog of Darmouth’s Tuck School of Business recently previewed the essay questions that will appear in the upcoming Class of 2017 application, which goes live later this summer.

Essay 1

Why is an MBA a critical next step toward your short- and long-term career goals? Why is Tuck the best MBA fit for you and your goals and why are you the best fit for Tuck?

Essay 2

Tell us about your most meaningful leadership experience and what role you played. What did you learn about your own individual strengths and weaknesses through this experience?

Essay 3 (Optional)

Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

Essay 4 (To be completed by all reapplicants) 

How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally.

***

The Tuck admissions team encourages applicants to respond fully but concisely to these essay questions, and to limit the length of their responses to 500 words for each essay.

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Tuck School of Business 2014-2015 MBA Application Deadlines

Tuck Dean Danos to Step Down After 19 Years

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Economist Ranks MBA Programs for Networking Potential

One metric of the Economist‘s annual ranking of business schools is the potential to network, which is arguably the most valuable aspect of the MBA experience. This sub-ranking aggregates, with equal weights, scores for: ratio …

One metric of the Economist‘s annual ranking of business schools is the potential to network, which is arguably the most valuable aspect of the MBA experience.

This sub-ranking aggregates, with equal weights, scores for: ratio of alumni to current students; number of countries (other than home country) in which a school has active alumni chapters; and student rating of extent/helpfulness of alumni network.

According to these metrics, the top ten includes a mixture of well-known and less prominent schools. For example, Economist places HEC Paris at the top of the list because it benefits from a large population of alumni relative to the size of its student intake, and it also has one of the most extensive networks of overseas alumni chapters.

American schools don’t place as well on this list because they usually have fewer international students, translating into fewer alumni working abroad after graduation.

Top ten business schools, ranked by “potential to network”

  1. HEC Paris
  2. Vlerick Leuven Gent Management School
  3. Thunderbird School of Global Management
  4. NYU Stern School of Business
  5. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  6. University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business
  7. Warwick Business School
  8. USC Marshall School of Business
  9. Melbourne Business School
  10. UV Darden School of Business

However, when the students themselves rank the effectiveness of alumni networks, more familiar names come out on top. This could be a case of “confirmation bias,” Economist editors concede, since students may be justifying the cost of an MBA at an elite school by reassuring themselves of its benefit to their careers.

Top 10 schools, extent/helpfulness of alumni network, as ranked by students

  1. Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business
  2. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  3. Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business
  4. University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business
  5. USC Marshall School of Business
  6. Cornell’s Johnson School of Management
  7. University of Michigan Ross School of Business
  8. UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School
  9. Harvard Business School
  10. IMD

Your alumni network helps you stay connected to the university and to countless professional opportunities beyond graduation. While the quality of the education at the most elite programs is guaranteed across the board, when you’re spending two years of your life and paying more than $100K, keep in mind the network of contacts you build during your MBA experience truly is priceless.

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