Tag Archives: Tuck School of Business

Dartmouth Tuck School of Business Essay Tips

The Dartmouth Tuck School of Business has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important to …

The Dartmouth Tuck School of Business has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important to consistently show how you will fit into the school values of leadership, teamwork and collaboration and bring your own unique qualities and experiences to the community.

Before you begin the essays think about the areas you want to communicate to the Tuck Business School admissions committee. As you consider each topic be sure to provide specific examples to illustrate your unique qualities. Real life experiences are your best evidence of leadership qualities, teamwork skills and management potential.

Stacy Blackman Consulting has worked with successful Tuck applicants for over a decade, contact us to learn more about the customized assistance we can provide for your application.

Essay 1
Why is an MBA a critical next step toward your short- and long-term career goals? Why is Tuck the best MBA fit for you and your goals and why are you the best fit for Tuck?

This standard career goals question requires you to clearly outline your short- and long-term career goals. Your short-term goals are the aspirations you have for your job immediately after graduation, while your long-term goals may be 10 or 20 years after you complete your MBA. In this relatively short essay you will need to explain what you have been pursuing in your career thus far, and why you need an MBA at this point in your life, along with your career goals.

“Why Tuck Business School” is an important aspect to this essay, and your opportunity to demonstrate fit. Make sure you have researched the school’s programs and determined your education will suit your plans. By reaching out to current students and alumni you will gain crucial insights that will provide a personal perspective on the culture of the school.

Essay 2
Tell us about your most meaningful collaborative leadership experience and what role you played. What did you learn about your own individual strengths and weaknesses through this experience?

This question gets at your strengths and weaknesses as a leader. An addition to this question this year is the use of the word “collaborative” when associated with leadership. Tuck is a close knit community with a strong alumni network, and considering your leadership skills in a group context will be important to demonstrate fit with the program.

This essay requires that you describe one specific example that illustrates your leadership challenges and strengths. Think about the leadership opportunities that led to a deeper understanding of yourself and others, and may have resulted in definition of your strengths or an improvement in your weaknesses. The example you choose can be from work or community involvement, as “great leadership can be accomplished in the pursuit or business and societal goals.”

You will need to adhere to the Tuck School of Business definition of leadership and include a team-based aspect to your example. As you describe your leadership experience, make sure you explain how you were able to inspire and enable others to accomplish.

Essay 3
Describe a circumstance in your life in which you faced adversity, failure, or setback. What actions did you take as a result and what did you learn from this experience?

This question is your opportunity to show how you handle challenging situations. Everyone faces adversity, failure or setbacks at work or in personal life, and it is how you decide to react that demonstrates your character. Revealing your emotions and thought process along with your actions in this essay will provide a window into how you process difficult experiences and emerge from them with a new direction.

Think back to Tuck Business School’s criteria, and consider using this essay to either demonstrate your interpersonal skills (if your challenge was of the interpersonal variety) or to show something from your background or experience that is unique.

When brainstorming for this essay think first about what you learned from the situation, and then work backwards to describe the circumstances and the initial challenge or hurdle, that will help you see the whole situation from a more optimistic viewpoint. Did you learn from the experience and did it impact your life or demonstrate a specific aspect of your character, goals or accomplishments? Even the most difficult situations often lead to personal growth and change and have contributed to who you are today.

Essay 4
(Optional) Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

This is your opportunity to discuss any perceived weaknesses in your application such as low GPA or gaps in your work experience. When approaching a question of this nature, focus on explanations rather than excuses and explain what you have done since the event you are explaining to demonstrate your academic ability or management potential.

You could potentially use this space to add something new that was not covered in the previous essays or in the application, resume or recommendations, however use your judgment about the topics as Tuck asks that you only complete this question if you “feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.”

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Tuck School of Business 2013-2014 Deadlines

Tuck School of Business has posted the application deadlines for the upcoming admissions season. The deadlines are as follows:   Early Action Round Deadline: October 9, 2013 Notification: December 18, 2013   November Round Deadline: …

Tuck School of Business has posted the application deadlines for the upcoming admissions season. The deadlines are as follows:

 

Early Action Round

Deadline: October 9, 2013

Notification: December 18, 2013

 

November Round

Deadline: November 6, 2013

Notification: February 7, 2014

 

January Round

Deadline: January 3, 2014

Notification: March 14, 2014

 

April Round

Deadline: April 2, 2014

Notification: May 16, 2014

 

First Consortium Round

Deadline: October 15, 2013

Notification: February 7, 2014

 

Second Consortium Round

Deadline: January 15, 2014

Notification: March 14, 2014

***

For more information, visit Tuck’s admissions website.

 

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Tuck School of Business 2013-2014 MBA Essays

In a recent post on the Tuck School of Business MBA blog, Kristin Roth in admissions offers a preview of the revised Tuck essays that will form a part of the upcoming application. Although it …

In a recent post on the Tuck School of Business MBA blog, Kristin Roth in admissions offers a preview of the revised Tuck essays that will form a part of the upcoming application. Although it won’t become available until later this summer, anxious applicants now have a jump start on this crucial application component.

Tuck School of Business

Essays

“Please respond fully but concisely to the following essay questions. There are no right or wrong answers. We encourage applicants to limit the length of their responses to 500 words for each essay. Please double-space your responses.”

1. Why is an MBA a critical next step toward your short- and long-term career goals? Why is Tuck the best MBA fit for you and your goals and why are you the best fit for Tuck?

2. Tell us about your most meaningful collaborative leadership experience and what role you played. What did you learn about your own individual strengths and weaknesses through this experience?

3. Describe a circumstance in your life in which you faced adversity, failure, or setback. What actions did you take as a result and what did you learn from this experience?

4. (Optional) Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

5. (To be completed by all reapplicants) How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally.

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Business Schools Look at Applicants’ EQ, Says WSJ

As if worrying about your GMAT scores, essay prompts and letters of recommendation wasn’t enough, more and more business schools are incorporating assessments in emotional intelligence quotient, or EQ, for incoming applicants. Emotional intelligence is …

As if worrying about your GMAT scores, essay prompts and letters of recommendation wasn’t enough, more and more business schools are incorporating assessments in emotional intelligence quotient, or EQ, for incoming applicants.

Emotional intelligence is defined as the ability to perceive, control, and evaluate emotions, and according to Melissa Korn‘s recent article in the Wall Street Journal, looking at EQ is “the latest attempt by business schools to identify future stars.”

Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business has been posing a 206-item online questionnaire called the Personal Characteristics Inventory since 2010, which screens them for traits such as teamwork and leadership abilities that the school has found in its most successful students and graduates, the WSJ reports.

Andrew Sama, senior associate director of M.B.A. admissions at Mendoza, notes that companies select for top talent with these types of assessments, adding “If we are selecting for future business leaders, why shouldn’t we be [using] similar tools?”

Meanwhile, the Yale School of Management plans to try out the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test on volunteers from the current crop of applicants in the coming weeks. Bruce DelMonico, assistant dean and director of M.B.A. admissions, tells WSJ that for now, the school is merely in the process of gathering data on what traits predict success, so the results of the online self-assessment won’t affect admission decisions.

Admissions Director Dawna Clarke of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth tells the WSJ she’s still searching for a test that accurately and consistently measures EQ, but notes that the school asks people who recommend a student to score the applicant on their ability to cope with pressure, intellectual curiosity and other traits.

While the inclusion of EQ assessments in MBA admissions decisions may strike fear in the heart of some applicants, others—perhaps those with lighter resumes—will find relief in being valued for their competencies in this area.

 

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Vanderbilt Owen School Culls New Dean from Tuck

Vanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management has named M. Eric Johnson as dean effective July 1st, pending approval by the Vanderbilt Board of Trust. Currently, Johnson is associate dean at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School …

new dean at vanderbilt owenVanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management has named M. Eric Johnson as dean effective July 1st, pending approval by the Vanderbilt Board of Trust. Currently, Johnson is associate dean at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business, where he has been responsible for seven research centers and initiatives as well as its top-ranked MBA program.

Johnson, who called the Owen school “a true gem among the world’s best business schools,” previously spent eight years (1991-99) at Owen, the last three as a tenured associate professor of operations management. He twice won awards for teaching excellence.

“The return of Eric Johnson to Vanderbilt marks the start of an exciting new era at the Owen Graduate School of Management,” said Provost Richard McCarty, in a press release from the school.  “Eric is one of the leading scholars of supply chains and the impact of information technology on corporations. He is also a proven leader whose record of accomplishments at Dartmouth is enviable by any measure.”

Tuck School dean Paul Danos congratulated Johnson on his appointment, saying, “During his time at Tuck Eric was truly an academic leader at the school and an outstanding teacher.  He has been much beloved by students for his flair in the classroom and dedication to their personal transformation and by faculty and staff for his collegiality and wisdom.”

Chris Guthrie, dean of Vanderbilt Law School and head of the search committee that selected Johnson, called his hiring a coup for Vanderbilt, as well as a testament to the strength, vitality and reputation of the Owen School.

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Make the Most of Your B-School Campus Visit

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA blog on U.S.News.com You wouldn’t buy a house you hadn’t seen in person first, would you? With the average total cost of an MBA education at the most …

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA blog on U.S.News.com

You wouldn’t buy a house you hadn’t seen in person first, would you? With the average total cost of an MBA education at the most elite business schools creeping upwards of $300,000, it makes good sense to visit the campus to get to know a program beyond its ranking.

During a visit, you’ll observe the general routine of students, get a feel for in-class dynamics, and be better able to imagine yourself as a part of the community where you will spend the next two years.

As former applicant blogger Mango, now in her first year at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, puts it, “School visits are a lot like online dating””you may have built up in your mind this amazing idea of what a school is like, but you can’t really make a decision of whether it is right for you until you go and visit and have that interaction.”

Some admissions departments, such as those at Harvard Business School and Stanford University Graduate School of Business, are quick to point out that a campus visit is not a requirement and has no bearing on admissions decisions.

Other schools, such as the relatively remote Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, do take note of who has made the effort to visit in person because diligence is a strong signal that a candidate is serious about that particular school.

Spring is an ideal time to schedule your school visits. It makes little sense to check out the campus during summer, when classes aren’t in session, because one key characteristic you want to observe is the interaction between students and faculty. While on campus, make sure you check out the whole university because its entire resources may someday be available to you.

Through the MBA admissions office, you can schedule a visit that typically includes an information session, the option of attending a class, and a chance to chat with a current student over coffee or a meal. During the class visit, take note of the dynamic between the students and professor before and after class, as this can be an indicator of how close-knit and collaborative the community is.

In some cases, the admissions office may be able to put you in contact with a student with similar career goals, which provides an ideal way to learn more specifics about the program as it relates to your professional needs.

Talking to current students is the best way to learn about the program. And don’t just talk to a couple of people””this is too big a decision to make without first experiencing a variety of conversations and points of view while on campus. Politely explain to students that you’re trying to get a feel for the community and would like to know more about why they chose this particular school””and chances are excellent they will be happy to share their insights with you.

The MBA-focused website Poets & Quants has a great list of essential questions to ask when you visit a b-school, such as: “What is one thing you would change about the school?” “How often do you interact with professors outside of the classroom?” “Have you developed relationships with alumni during your time here?”

Married b-school hopefuls, especially those with young children, should also attempt to find out how family-friendly the MBA program is to get a better idea of what life in their situation would be like.

A huge part of the b-school experience is the social aspect, which helps forge the strong network you’ll rely on after graduation. While visiting the school, find out where students go to relax and unwind””typically the local watering holes, as MBAs do enjoy their potent libations!

If you can stay for a few days, try to immerse yourself in the social scene and connect with students who are interested in the same activities you hope to become involved in. Often you’ll learn more about your fit with a particular school over these types of encounters than during an official admissions tour.

Ultimately, the decision of whether to plan your visit before applying, once you’ve been invited to interview, or after you’ve received an offer of admission is a personal one. Each has its merits, and barring the prohibitive expense of multiple visits, would be worthwhile.

Whichever option you choose, figuring out for yourself how a particular program suits your needs is a crucial step in the b-school application process.

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