Tag Archives: Tuck School of Business

Vanderbilt Owen School Culls New Dean from Tuck

Vanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management has named M. Eric Johnson as dean effective July 1st, pending approval by the Vanderbilt Board of Trust. Currently, Johnson is associate dean at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School …

new dean at vanderbilt owen

Vanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management has named M. Eric Johnson as dean effective July 1st, pending approval by the Vanderbilt Board of Trust. Currently, Johnson is associate dean at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business, where he has been responsible for seven research centers and initiatives as well as its top-ranked MBA program.

Johnson, who called the Owen school “a true gem among the world’s best business schools,” previously spent eight years (1991-99) at Owen, the last three as a tenured associate professor of operations management. He twice won awards for teaching excellence.

“The return of Eric Johnson to Vanderbilt marks the start of an exciting new era at the Owen Graduate School of Management,” said Provost Richard McCarty, in a press release from the school.  “Eric is one of the leading scholars of supply chains and the impact of information technology on corporations. He is also a proven leader whose record of accomplishments at Dartmouth is enviable by any measure.”

Tuck School dean Paul Danos congratulated Johnson on his appointment, saying, “During his time at Tuck Eric was truly an academic leader at the school and an outstanding teacher.  He has been much beloved by students for his flair in the classroom and dedication to their personal transformation and by faculty and staff for his collegiality and wisdom.”

Chris Guthrie, dean of Vanderbilt Law School and head of the search committee that selected Johnson, called his hiring a coup for Vanderbilt, as well as a testament to the strength, vitality and reputation of the Owen School.

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Make the Most of Your B-School Campus Visit

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA blog on U.S.News.com You wouldn’t buy a house you hadn’t seen in person first, would you? With the average total cost of an MBA education at the most …

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA blog on U.S.News.com

You wouldn’t buy a house you hadn’t seen in person first, would you? With the average total cost of an MBA education at the most elite business schools creeping upwards of $300,000, it makes good sense to visit the campus to get to know a program beyond its ranking.

During a visit, you’ll observe the general routine of students, get a feel for in-class dynamics, and be better able to imagine yourself as a part of the community where you will spend the next two years.

As former applicant blogger Mango, now in her first year at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, puts it, “School visits are a lot like online dating””you may have built up in your mind this amazing idea of what a school is like, but you can’t really make a decision of whether it is right for you until you go and visit and have that interaction.”

Some admissions departments, such as those at Harvard Business School and Stanford University Graduate School of Business, are quick to point out that a campus visit is not a requirement and has no bearing on admissions decisions.

Other schools, such as the relatively remote Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, do take note of who has made the effort to visit in person because diligence is a strong signal that a candidate is serious about that particular school.

Spring is an ideal time to schedule your school visits. It makes little sense to check out the campus during summer, when classes aren’t in session, because one key characteristic you want to observe is the interaction between students and faculty. While on campus, make sure you check out the whole university because its entire resources may someday be available to you.

Through the MBA admissions office, you can schedule a visit that typically includes an information session, the option of attending a class, and a chance to chat with a current student over coffee or a meal. During the class visit, take note of the dynamic between the students and professor before and after class, as this can be an indicator of how close-knit and collaborative the community is.

In some cases, the admissions office may be able to put you in contact with a student with similar career goals, which provides an ideal way to learn more specifics about the program as it relates to your professional needs.

Talking to current students is the best way to learn about the program. And don’t just talk to a couple of people””this is too big a decision to make without first experiencing a variety of conversations and points of view while on campus. Politely explain to students that you’re trying to get a feel for the community and would like to know more about why they chose this particular school””and chances are excellent they will be happy to share their insights with you.

The MBA-focused website Poets & Quants has a great list of essential questions to ask when you visit a b-school, such as: “What is one thing you would change about the school?” “How often do you interact with professors outside of the classroom?” “Have you developed relationships with alumni during your time here?”

Married b-school hopefuls, especially those with young children, should also attempt to find out how family-friendly the MBA program is to get a better idea of what life in their situation would be like.

A huge part of the b-school experience is the social aspect, which helps forge the strong network you’ll rely on after graduation. While visiting the school, find out where students go to relax and unwind””typically the local watering holes, as MBAs do enjoy their potent libations!

If you can stay for a few days, try to immerse yourself in the social scene and connect with students who are interested in the same activities you hope to become involved in. Often you’ll learn more about your fit with a particular school over these types of encounters than during an official admissions tour.

Ultimately, the decision of whether to plan your visit before applying, once you’ve been invited to interview, or after you’ve received an offer of admission is a personal one. Each has its merits, and barring the prohibitive expense of multiple visits, would be worthwhile.

Whichever option you choose, figuring out for yourself how a particular program suits your needs is a crucial step in the b-school application process.

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Applicant-Initiated Interviews at Tuck School of Business

Did you know that Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business offers applicants the chance to initiate an interview with admissions? Unlike it’s peer schools, which typically maintain an invitation-only policy, Tuck’s Open Interview Policy means that …

Tuck School of Business

Did you know that Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business offers applicants the chance to initiate an interview with admissions? Unlike it’s peer schools, which typically maintain an invitation-only policy, Tuck’s Open Interview Policy means that any applicant who wants to visit the school and interview with the admissions committee may do so.

In a video message posted to the Tuck School website, Director of Admissions Dawna Clarke explains that interviews are so helpful for the admissions committee in order to assess those valuable interpersonal skills, team skills, leadership skills, and of course, communication skills.

Applicants want the opportunity to be heard, and Tuck is proud to be able to offer that opportunity to any applicant who requests it, Clarke says, noting that “An interview really helps us get a sense of your personality and softer skills that are a little harder to assess on the basis of a written application.”

The interviews are with either second-year students or a member of the admissions committee, and applicants have the opportunity to sit in on a class, have lunch with a second-year student, tour the facilities, and participate in an information session with an AdCom member during their visit.

For applicants unable to visit Tuck and take advantage of the open interview option, Clarke says that they would need to briefly explain the reason on their application and wait for the admissions committee invitation to interview, which is issued after an initial review of a candidate’s application.

According to Tuck, on-campus interviews are conducted by admissions committee members and selected second-year students. Off-campus interviews are conducted by admissions committee members, admissions associates, or alumni interviewers. All interviews are evaluated equally, regardless of interviewer, location, or how initiated.

Applicants should note that with the exception of the January round, interviews must be completed by the published deadline for the round in which you are applying. Because the January round deadline is 1/3/13, the applicant-initiated interview deadline is January 31st.

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The Global Challenge of Interlinking Business and Society

Business will play a key role in solving the most pressing global problems of our times: population growth, resource shortages, struggling economies. In fact, “Never before, have companies and society been so closely connected,” says …

Business will play a key role in solving the most pressing global problems of our times: population growth, resource shortages, struggling economies. In fact, “Never before, have companies and society been so closely connected,” says Pierre Tapie, President of the ESSEC Business School.

Together with Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, Keio Business School in Tokyo, the School of Management of Fudan University in Shanghai, and the Business School of the University of Mannheim, ESSEC forged an alliance of leading business schools from all parts of the world.

The goal of this alliance? To debate central economic and societal questions of the future, and to develop problem-solving approaches, while embedding them in research and education.

At a recent conference, more than 200 high-profile scientists, business representatives, and students from the home countries of the five alliance partners debated questions that are both current and controversial: How can we best shape Corporate Governance? What impact does this have on the leadership of companies? And what solutions exist for the tension-laden issue of profitability and responsibility?

The international alliance of the five business schools is the ideal platform for this debate. After all, they represent five nations, that, when combined, account for almost 50% of global economic output. Together, the five institutions have more than 600 renowned scientists, 20,000 current students and 90,000 alumni.

A study conducted among graduate students at these cooperating business schools shows that future leaders in the United States already regard ethical conduct as the most important quality of a successful top manager. Internationally, this attribute ranks second to competence in financial questions, but ahead of both strategic orientation and the ability to motivate employees.

“The values of companies on the one side, and business schools as research institutions and educational establishments for executives on the other, strongly influence each other. For this reason, we must deliver the answers for the issues of the future,” states Tapie.

One of the most important insights of the conference was summarized by Dr. Werner Brandt, Chief Financial Officer of the SAP AG:

“Corporate governance has become one of the central leadership issues. While corporate governance was shaped by the strategy of a company before, the reverse is the case today. The starting point for the formulation of a company’s strategy is always the definition of a value system.”

Eric Labaye, Director of McKinsey & Company, France, emphasized that these deliberations are not limited to shareholders, but must incorporate all stakeholders, meaning employees, customers, suppliers, as well as organizations and associations.

“Additionally, the focus should be placed on the pursuit of long-term goals, such as employee satisfaction, innovation, or the securing of a good reputation, as opposed to financial figures of short-term relevance,” noted Labaye. Naturally, this must not come at the expense of profitability.

As Paul Danos, Dean of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth noted: “Tuck has a Center for Business and Society on campus which focuses on opportunities for students to interact with nonprofit organizations and also to study other critical societal issues. Tuck’s association with the Council allows us to extend our reach and gives us a global perspective on issues at the intersection of business and society.”

In the coming years, each of the alliance schools will take a turn in hosting one of the next international forums. In January 2013, Fundação Getulio Vargas in Brazil will join the alliance as the sixth international alliance partner.

(source: Tuck School of Business Interlinking Business and Society – a Challenge for Business Schools around the Globe)

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Spotlight On: Tuck Entrepreneurship Initiative

Last fall, Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business launched the Entrepreneurship Initiative (EI) to support and enhance the resources available to students interested in entrepreneurial ventures. One year later, the response has been overwhelmingly positive. …

Tuck School of Business

Last fall, Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business launched the Entrepreneurship Initiative (EI) to support and enhance the resources available to students interested in entrepreneurial ventures. One year later, the response has been overwhelmingly positive.

Of the MBA students who graduated from Tuck in 2012, about half the class had listed entrepreneurship as one of their main interests upon enrollment, the school reveals, noting that about 55 percent acted on this interest before graduation by enrolling in entrepreneurship courses or undertaking course projects where they worked on an entrepreneurial idea.

About 10 percent of the class chose to take a step further by devoting significant time outside of the classroom to improving and developing their ideas through structured extracurricular activities organized by the new initiative, such as the Summer Venture program.

The initiative has expanded several programs at Tuck, including the Barris Incubator Program, which supports and facilitates the launch and development of Tuck- and Dartmouth-related ventures. The EI also established the Entrepreneur in Residence program.

The program taps into the wealth of Tuck and Dartmouth entrepreneurs by connecting them with current students. Visiting entrepreneurs give a presentation to students, hold office hours and one-on-one meetings, and are available for student consultation beyond their visit to campus, making it easier for students and visitors to connect.

“By taking advantage of the entrepreneurial resources at Tuck, you get the best of both worlds,” says Joaquin Villarreal (Tuck MBA ’08), manager of the initiative.

“You get a top-notch business education, which you can apply towards more traditional career choices for MBAs,” he adds. “You can also explore the process behind starting a new venture and develop a set of tools to address the distinctive challenges that face both start-ups and established businesses.”

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Vanderbilt Owen Appoints New MBA Admissions Director

Vanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management has named Christie St-John as its new Director of Admissions, effective Oct. 1, 2012. St-John returns to Vanderbilt from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, where …

Vanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management has named Christie St-John as its new Director of Admissions, effective Oct. 1, 2012.

christie-st-john-tuck-school-of-business-at-dartmouth-web

St-John returns to Vanderbilt from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, where she has served as Senior Associate Director of Admissions and Recruiting since 2004. St-John began her MBA admissions career at Vanderbilt in 1997, where she oversaw international recruitment.

Previously St-John held roles in marketing, as well as in oil and gas trading. A Nashville native, she holds a Master’s degree and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt. St-John has lived abroad and travelled to 70 countries for both work and pleasure.

“We are excited to welcome Christie back to Vanderbilt,” said Jim Bradford, Dean of the Owen Graduate School. “She combines a vast global experience with a keen understanding and appreciation of what makes a top graduate management program.”

Tami Fassinger, Chief Recruiting Officer for the Owen Graduate School, added that St-John would also play a key role in the school’s larger strategy of aligning incoming student career objectives with placement results on a broad geographic scale.

“Christie’s ability to relate to our global talent pool is invaluable to where we’re going as a school. We’re glad to have her back on our team.” Fassinger said. “I hired Christie in her first tenure at Vanderbilt. We’ve missed her talent, as well as her international mindset and far-reaching network.”

St-John will handle recruiting and admissions for the full-time MBA and one-year Master of Finance (MSF) programs.

“Vanderbilt has seen a great deal of positive momentum in recent years,” St-John said. “I am pleased to have the opportunity to increase the school’s reach, both in the U.S. and globally.”

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