Tag Archives: UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson 2014-2015 Application Deadlines

The UCLA Anderson School of Management has announced the deadlines for the upcoming MBA admissions cycle. The three deadlines are: Round 1 Deadline: October 22, 2014 Notification: January 28, 2015 Round 2 Deadline: January 7, 2015 Notification: April 2, …

The UCLA Anderson School of Management has announced the deadlines for the upcoming MBA admissions cycle. The three deadlines are:

Round 1

Deadline: October 22, 2014
Notification: January 28, 2015

Round 2

Deadline: January 7, 2015
Notification: April 2, 2015

Round 3

Deadline: April 15, 2015
Notification: June 3, 2015

Completed applications must be received by 11:59 p.m. PST on the day of the deadline to be considered in a particular round.  UCLA Anderson notes that earlier admits enjoy greater availability of fellowships, housing and networking events, so you should apply as soon as your candidacy looks strong.

For more information, visit UCLA Anderson’s admissions website.

Posted in School News | Tagged , ,

Changing of the Guards at UCLA Anderson, Simon School

Two new deanships have been announced in the last week, and both are connected to UCLA Anderson School of Management.  Professor and corporate finance scholar Mark Garmaise has been named dean of the full-time MBA program …

Two new deanships have been announced in the last week, and both are connected to UCLA Anderson School of Management.  Professor and corporate finance scholar Mark Garmaise has been named dean of the full-time MBA program at UCLA Anderson, and his predecessor Andrew Ainslie will become dean at University of Rochester Simon Business School. Both will assume their new responsibilities in July.

Garmaise’s academic research has centered on using empirical data to investigate the effects of asymmetric information and incomplete contracting as they relate to real estate markets and entrepreneurial firms.

A Harvard University graduate with a Ph.D. in finance from Stanford Graduate School of Business, Garmaise joined UCLA Anderson as a visiting assistant professor in the finance area in 2001. He was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2008 and to full professor this year.

“In Mark, we have a combination of remarkable talents – an outstanding teacher who is dedicated to his MBA students, and a trailblazing scholar who infuses his teaching with relevant and emerging research findings,” says Judy Olian, dean of UCLA Anderson.

“Mark is an award-winning instructor and highly respected authority on finance, venture capital and private equity. That combination, and his dedication to UCLA Anderson’s MBA program, will assure strong continuing leadership for the Anderson MBA program.”

In announcing Ainslie’s appointment as the seventh dean of the Simon School, University of Rochester President Joel Seligman spoke of Ainslie’s stellar impact at UCLA Anderson, where it was noted that during his tenure, the school increased its admissions by more than 60%, increased placements by more than 20%, and revised its curriculum.

“He will be an outstanding dean. He is a creative and dynamic leader in business education,” Seligman says.

Ainslie has been associate professor of marketing at UCLA Anderson since 2005; he was assistant professor of marketing there from 2000 to 2005. From 1997 through 2000 he was assistant professor of marketing at Cornell University’s Johnson Graduate School of Management. He joined Anderson in 2000 and has led the full-time MBA program since 2010. He succeeds Mark Zupan, dean of the Simon School since 2004.

“Andrew Ainslie impressed us with his leadership experience, his commitment to the research mission, and his farsighted approach to the challenges facing all MBA programs,” says Janice Willett, chair of the Trustees and Friends Advisory Committee for the search.

Dean Olian adds, “We are proud of Andrew’s ascent to the Rochester deanship and so appreciative of his many accomplishments at Anderson.His unrestrained passion for MBA education and his clear analytic focus to drive strategic actions will no doubt advance the Simon School just as it benefitted Anderson.”

Posted in General, School News | Tagged , , , , ,

Waitlist Guidelines from Chicago Booth, UCLA Anderson

While the waitlist may not seem like the ideal status for your MBA application, the good news is you’re still in the running while the school looks more closely at your application package in the …

While the waitlist may not seem like the ideal status for your MBA application, the good news is you’re still in the running while the school looks more closely at your application package in the context of the next round of candidates.

UCLA Anderson School of Management and the Chicago Booth School of Business recently posted advice for Round 1 applicants who have been waitlisted, and since their suggestions are nearly identical, we’re sharing them together in this post.

  • Waitlisted applications are considered in subsequent rounds, so these applications are reviewed side-by-side with those under review from Round 2.
  • Waitlisted applicants will, in most cases, receive an admit or deny decision by the Round 2 notification date. The decision deadline at UCLA Anderson is April 2nd. Final decisions are released on March 27th at Chicago Booth.
  • Some candidates may be invited to remain on the waitlist into Round 3.
  • Both schools offer waitlisted candidates the option of submitting additional information in support of their candidacy.
  • UCLA Anderson would like to hear from you if you’ve improved your GMAT score, received a promotion at work, or had a recent extracurricular accomplishment.
  • Chicago Booth suggests applicants take a closer look at their application to determine any weak points, and reminds waitlisted applicants of the option to submit a short video explaining why you are a fit for Booth.

No matter which school’s waitlist you may land on, make sure every interaction you have with the admissions department adds value to your file. As UCLA Anderson aptly states, quality is more important than quantity. An information overload will likely have a negative effect on your candidacy, so use your good judgement here!

Posted in Application Tips, School News | Tagged , , , ,

Thoughts on the UCLA Anderson Interview

While the idea of the MBA interview rattles the nerves of most applicants, like most schools, UCLA Anderson School of Management views this step of the process as a way to get to know the …

school-ucla-anderson

While the idea of the MBA interview rattles the nerves of most applicants, like most schools, UCLA Anderson School of Management views this step of the process as a way to get to know the person behind the paper.

In the latest post to The MBA Insider’s Blog, Vickie Euyoque assures nervous candidates that the interview really is more like a conversation, with the goal of sharing with the interviewer what is unique about you, and how would you contribute to the Anderson community.

I think what’s particularly noteworthy about this post is the concept of evaluating applicants through several different “lenses.” Here’s an excerpt explaining what this means:

“…we are evaluating you through several different lenses: through the lens of an admissions representative, we are gauging your capacity to do well in the program, how active you will be as a student and alum, as well as your overall fit in our community; through the lens of a student we are evaluating how you will interact with the rest of our students, what you will contribute to their experience, and your facility to work well as a part of a team; and through the lens of a recruiter, we are evaluating your interview skills, your aptitude to present yourself positively, and ultimately, your potential to secure a job post-MBA.”

This is great advice, no matter where you’re applying. The notion of evaluating your interview skills as they relate to future employment recruiting is something we don’t hear about often, but it really is a critical component of the interview process and one you should give some serious thought to as you prepare for the exchange.

 

Posted in General | Tagged , , , ,

MBA Essay Insight from UCLA Anderson

Many schools reduced the number of required essays this season, and UCLA Anderson School of Management is one of them. With just one prompt—What are your short-term and long-term career goals, and how will an …

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Many schools reduced the number of required essays this season, and UCLA Anderson School of Management is one of them. With just one prompt—What are your short-term and long-term career goals, and how will an MBA from UCLA Anderson specifically help you achieve these goals?—applicants either feel relieved at what could be perceived as less work, or more stressed, as they ponder how to answer the question in a memorable and insightful way.

In the latest post on the MBA Insider’s Blog, the staff in Anderson admissions and financial aid attempts to explain the rationale for the single essay question, and offers tips on how to successfully approach the question. While the posted advice is targeted specifically for Anderson MBA hopefuls, the question is common to many schools and therefore pertinent to all b-school applicants.

Like other programs, UCLA Anderson has reduced the number of essays simply as an attempt to focus applicants’—and AdComs’— energies on what matters most. The question acts as a set-up for the face-to-face interview, and basically rounds out the admissions committee’s assessment of the information provided in the rest of the application, Anderson explains.

Remember, the program is asking for a clear set of career goals that will demonstrate the need for an MBA from UCLA Anderson. A key tip for applicants: identify the classes, professors, activities, clubs, tools and other extra curricular opportunities offered by the program and explain how they would help you achieve your goals.

It may be relevant to provide background that highlights your career passions and sets up your future goals. Briefly explain what you plan to do immediately after graduation, and then what you want to accomplish over the long-term with your career. A career path that focuses on demonstrated passions and interests throughout your life is going to be most compelling as you write this essay.

UCLA Anderson acknowledges that most MBA candidates aren’t professional writers, and many may not even be native English speakers, but that shouldn’t stop you from injecting your personality and style into the essay. Just make sure to have friends or family read through your draft before submitting to ensure your message is coming across clearly, the school advises. Also, UCLA Anderson checks essays for plagiarism, so be sure to submit only original work.

For more advice about the Anderson MBA essays, including what to say in the re-applicant essay and how and when to use the optional essay, read Stacy Blackman’s recent tips post here.

Posted in Application Tips | Tagged , , ,

UCLA Anderson: 3 Tips for Recommendation Letters

The UCLA Anderson School of Management MBA Insider’s Blog recently provided three bits of advice for any applicant feeling flustered by the process of procuring letters of recommendation for their b-school application. A letter from …

The UCLA Anderson School of Management MBA Insider’s Blog recently provided three bits of advice for any applicant feeling flustered by the process of procuring letters of recommendation for their b-school application.

A letter from a current, direct supervisor is ideal. However, for candidates who haven’t yet shared their pursuit of an MBA  degree with their employer, Lindsay Haselton in admissions advises reaching out to either indirect supervisors, former employers, supervisors from extracurricular organizations, or clients—especially for applicants who are self-employed.

One thing you shouldn’t do is seek a recommendation from a former college professor, as business schools prefer to hear from people who can speak to your accomplishments in the work environment rather than the academic setting.

Secondly, be sure to thoroughly prep your recommenders and give them plenty of time to prepare the letter in time for your deadline. You may find it helpful to advance the due date by a week or so in order to remove one last-minute worry from your plate.

Provide your recommenders with a copy of your resume, as well as a reminder list of accomplishments or strengths they have already witnessed in your performance to jog their memory and provide examples for the letter. Read my post on how to strategize and manage the recommendation process for more tips.

Finally, don’t be tempted to go for the “big name” or position when it comes to choosing a recommender. So many people think choosing a well-known or prestigious individual will be the ticket to acceptance at the b-school of their dreams.

The key when selecting recommenders is to think about about their placement in your life; can they write about you thoughtfully and with enough insight so that the admissions committee can get an authentic feel for you as a person, as well as your skills and capabilities? The best choice is always the person with whom you interact on a day-to-day basis and can speak to your leadership and management potential, Haselton counsels.

Don’t underestimate the importance of your recommenders, as some top schools have said the letters of recommendation are the most important aspect of the application. This third-party input and perspective on you as an individual is invaluable when schools are making their admit decisions, so choose wisely, and make sure they are as professionally executed as every other aspect of your application.

Posted in General | Tagged , , ,