Tag Archives: Wharton School

7 Podcasts to Feed Your Mind This Thanksgiving Weekend

When you finally emerge from your Tryptophan coma this Thanksgiving weekend and have a hankering for some food for thought, check out these illuminating B-school podcasts that cover entrepreneurship, creativity, leadership and marketing tactics. Professor …

When you finally emerge from your Tryptophan coma this Thanksgiving weekend and have a hankering for some food for thought, check out these illuminating B-school podcasts that cover entrepreneurship, creativity, leadership and marketing tactics.

MBA podcasts

Professor Dorie Clark at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business talks about what it takes to succeed in business today. Whether you’re an entrepreneur or an employee, it’s all about standing out.

From the online publication Kellogg Insight, October’s faculty podcast features two Kellogg School of Management professors and a lecturer about the power of storytelling, as well as their tips to become a better storyteller.

Wendy Huber, Assistant Dean for the Full-Time MBA Program at Darden School of Business offers tips on how to achieve success in business school.

Harvard Business School launched a podcast series this fall called Cold Call, and the episode “Dangerous Mines: Saving Lives Through Leadership” stresses safety in South Africa’s platinum mines.

Brit Morin, founder and CEO of Brit + Co, discusses Inspiring Creativity with Great Content in this podcast from Entrepreneurial Thought Corner at Stanford University.

Nicholas Epley, professor of behavioral science at Chicago Booth School of Business, debunks some dangerous myths about gender differences.

This one falls under the marketing category, but it’s also just really fun and interesting for anyone headed to see “Spectre” this weekend. The Wharton School‘s Knowledge@Wharton publication offers this new podcast: The Spy Whom We Loved: The Enduring Appeal of James Bond.

We hope you enjoy this little bit of brain food and find something useful—and interesting—in each of these suggestions.

Image credit: Flickr user Patrick Breitenbach (CC By 2.0)

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Harvard Business School Crowned No. 1 By Poets & Quants

Poets & Quants released its 2015 MBA ranking this week, and Harvard Business School has reclaimed the title of world’s best business school after rebounding from second place last year. HBS has landed the top …

Harvard Business School ranked number 1

Poets & Quants released its 2015 MBA ranking this week, and Harvard Business School has reclaimed the title of world’s best business school after rebounding from second place last year. HBS has landed the top spot for five of the six years P&Q has published its composite ranking.

The school will continue to have a huge head start in maintaining that lead given its $3 billion endowment, which is three times the size of Stanford Graduate School of Business, its nearest competitor, notes P&Q editor John A. Byrne in Fortune. HBS has already raised more than $860 million toward the school’s $1 billion capital campaign, which still has three years remaining.

No rival beats Harvard in the formidable resources it brings to the game: more superstar professors than any other school, the diversity of its course offerings, the stellar quality of its students, the size and scope of its campus, and the career achievements of its alumni spread all over the world,” writes Byrnes.

Top Ten U.S. MBA Programs

  1. Harvard Business School
  2. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  3. Chicago Booth School of Business
  4. University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School
  5. Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management
  6. Columbia Business School
  7. MIT Sloan School of Management
  8. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  9. Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business
  10. Yale School of Management

Top Ten International MBA Programs

  1. INSEAD
  2. London Business School
  3. IESE Business School
  4. IE Business School
  5. HEC Paris
  6. IMD
  7. Cambridge Judge Business School
  8. ESADE
  9. SDA Bocconi
  10. Oxford Saïd Business School

According to Poets & Quants, the lineup of the best U.S. MBA programs combines the five most influential rankings but each is weighted separately to reflect P&Q’s view of their authority: U.S. News & World Report is given a weight of 35%, Forbes 25%, Bloomberg Businessweek 15%, The Financial Times 15%, and The Economist receives a weight of 10%.

“The list is far more stable–and reliable–than most rankings published elsewhere, taking into account a massive wealth of quantitative and qualitative data captured in these major lists, from surveys of corporate recruiters, MBA graduates, deans and faculty publication records to median GPA and GMAT scores of entering students as well as the latest salary and employment statistics of alumni,” Byrne explains.

You may also be interested in:

Columbia’s Dean Hubbard on MBA Rankings
Rethinking MBA Rankings

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MBA Essay Advice for IT Candidates

We often field questions from clients working in Information Technology about how best to frame their work experiences within a 500-word MBA application essay, especially since the technologist often believes it necessary to provide meaningful …

technology fortune cookieWe often field questions from clients working in Information Technology about how best to frame their work experiences within a 500-word MBA application essay, especially since the technologist often believes it necessary to provide meaningful context when describing the “What I did” aspect of the essay question.

Truth is, business schools don’t really care whether you can code in java or possess multiple certifications in Oracle, Linux, or Cloud+. The admissions committee doesn’t even need to know those aspects when reading about your technical projects, and getting bogged down in such details is the number one mistake that engineers applying to business school often make.

When describing a technical project, try to sum up the essence of the project in a non-technical way in one to two sentences. Share your essays with a friend outside of your industry to see if it makes sense to the lay person. Then, shift gears to devote the majority of the essay toward demonstrating the qualities that MBA programs do care about: leadership, teamwork, problem-solving, and international experience.

IT applicants typically have a lot of experience working in teams, so play up your interpersonal skills and describe how adept you are at collaborating well with others to meet goals. Leadership potential is huge at the top business schools, so talk about how you have showed leadership thus far, or discuss any cross-functional leadership experience you have had. As business becomes ever more connected across the globe, the ability to work well with colleagues abroad will become critical to success. If one of your projects crossed international lines, you can talk about how you managed working with different cultures across time zones and what you learned from the experience.

Show examples of when you solved a problem or overcame a challenge by coming up with a unique or innovative solution. Did you resolve a conflict, demonstrate teamwork, or act with integrity? The thesis of the essay should be based on one of these qualities that an MBA admissions committee would value, not technical details.

Another place to differential yourself from other IT applicants is when describing your professional goals. Where do you envision yourself five or ten years from now? Rather than stating a generic goal such as transitioning into strategy consulting, think about whether you ultimately see yourself owning your own business, creating innovative ways to improve cybersecurity, or becoming the CTO of an environmental non-profit.

While information technologists may fret about competing against a sizeable pool of similar applicants, your MBA essays provide the ideal platform to show you are more than your job. Use the essays to focus on the aspects of your personal life that make you unique: hobbies, community service activities, passions and interests that make you stand out.

When we began working with Abhi, an Indian engineer with his heart set on attending the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, his biggest roadblock was pertaining to an overrepresented demographic that would be competing with literally thousands of other MBA applicants.

Fortunately, Abhi had an admirable record of community involvement. But to make his candidacy really stand out from the masses, we decided to focus on a unique event in which he had coordinated a sizeable group to train for a marathon with the goal of raising funds to help a six-year-old girl with leukemia. In his essays, Abhi focused on the leadership aspects of the experience: how he recruited participants, organized several fundraising events, and dealt with the inevitable obstacles that arose during the planning phase.

By allowing the MBA admissions committee to better understand who Abhi was as a person, and what motivated him and ignited his personal and professional passions, he became much more than just another male IT candidate from India in the pile… and Wharton ultimately did extend an offer of admission to him.

No matter what your professional background is, the MBA essays are the place to show off your individuality, leadership potential, and exactly why you are b-school material. So don’t let industry jargon or the nitty gritty of your job description get in the way of creating memorable essays that capture the interest of the school of your dreams.

This article originally appeared on F1 GMAT

image credit: Flickr user Dean Johnson CC By 2.0

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MBA Students Hit Campus Early to Brush Up Skills, Network

While classes may not officially start for weeks, a new article in the Wall Street Journal reports that more and more MBA students are coming to campus early to participate in the crash quant courses …

summer programs for incoming MBAsWhile classes may not officially start for weeks, a new article in the Wall Street Journal reports that more and more MBA students are coming to campus early to participate in the crash quant courses traditionally offered to bring candidates from non-finance backgrounds up to speed before school starts.

The reason? Many students—even those with a finance background—have realized these early weeks on campus provide a valuable opportunity to network and bond with their future classmates before the rush of  classes and recruiting hit in the fall.

In response, business schools have expanded beyond statistics or math courses for these early birds. At Kenan-Flagler Business School, first-year MBAs can also participate in career workshops, resume reviews, and receive coaching on presentation skills, the WSJ reveals.

Meanwhile, summer program enrollment is up 30% over last year at University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, which told the WSJ that about 300 of the incoming class of 850 arrived on campus early for refresher classes and to take exams that might allow them to place out of required courses.

Pre-term coursework functions a bit differently at NYU Stern School of Business, which allows some students to start in July in order to lighten their course load during the school year. Isser Gallogly, assistant dean of MBA admissions at Stern, told the WSJ the school has seen a jump in requests for these spots, which allow students to “get to know each other quite well” and form close bonds.

It’s interesting to note that Harvard Business School is not providing summer courses this year to bring new students up to speed. Instead, WSJ reports that the school has offered members of the HBS Class of 2017 its online learning program known as HBX CORe (Credential of Readiness) at a slightly reduced rate: incoming first-years pay $1,500 for the program rather than the full price of $1,800.

You may also be interested in:

Summer Programs Bridge Biz Gap

Image credit: Flickr user Richard Foster  (CC BY-SA 2.0)

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Tuesday Tips: Wharton School Fall 2016 MBA Essay Tips

Wharton’s essay questions remain the same this year, with only one required prompt, an essay for reapplicants and an entirely open-ended optional question. Wharton has been experimenting with the admissions process for the last several …

Wharton’s essay questions remain the same this year, with only one required prompt, an essay for reapplicants and an entirely open-ended optional question. Wharton has been experimenting with the admissions process for the last several years and seems to have landed on a productive essay question that asks applicants to reflect upon their fit with Wharton both personally and professionally.

As you consider how to approach this set of essays make sure you are conducting thorough school research. Getting to know the Wharton community through campus visits, online research and the many admissions events around the globe will help you understand the personality of the school and the alumni network to write an effective set of essays.

Required Essay: What do you hope to gain both personally and professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

This is both a standard career goals question and an inquiry into your personality and potential success in the program.

Be careful to answer the specific question in this career goals essay. Notice that you are not asked about your professional background or your key accomplishments. To answer the question asked, you will want to focus mainly on the future and what you are planning to pursue with your MBA degree. At the same time, there is certainly room to add color by using your background information where it is most relevant to your goals. Think about the key moments of your professional life that crystallized your goals for you, and focus on illuminating those decision points rather than reciting your entire resume.

Understanding exactly how you fit in will help you describe what Wharton will do for you, as well as navigate interviews and other interactions with the Wharton admissions committee. Consider including specific information from your Wharton research in this essay such as Wharton faculty you would like to study with or unique educational opportunities at Wharton.

When you address your personal goals for the MBA make sure you are making the case for Wharton specifically. Consider what living in Philadelphia might be like, the many clubs and student activities, and leadership development opportunities like traveling to Antarctica with your classmates that may address some of your personal life goals.

Optional Essay: Please use the space below to highlight any additional information that you would like the Admissions Committee to know about your candidacy. (400 words)

If you think that your application materials and the required essay are enough to provide a complete picture of your candidacy you may want to forgo this essay. There is no need to submit additional material just to submit something – consider whether the admissions committee will appreciate the information or think you are wasting their time.

If you do choose to answer this question note that the essay can be used for any topic that you would like. If there is something about your personal background you did not cover in the required essay and it is relevant and useful for your application, this is the place to cover it. Perhaps you didn’t have room in the required essay to describe an important accomplishment or to tell a story about your life that is relevant to your pursuit of an MBA. Anything that you think will be an asset to your application is fair game as a topic for this essay.

Reapplicant Question: All reapplicants to Wharton are required to complete this essay. Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). (250 words)

All applicants, including reapplicants, can also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

All reapplicants are required to provide information that supports your renewed candidacy. The most successful version of the reapplicant essay will provide tangible evidence that you have improved the overall package you are submitting this year. Improvements like GMAT score or new quantitative classes as especially tangible, but a promotion, increase in responsibility at work, a job change or even a change of goals and mission can apply.

A rejection or waitlist last year is a form of feedback, and may have led to soul searching for you. When you describe your changes make sure reflect your ability to take feedback and improve. Describe how you approached the reapplication process after assessing your own strengths and weaknesses as a candidate and making the appropriate efforts to improve.

If you are not a reapplicant this essay is a potential space to address any areas of concern in your application. If you have a low GPA or GMAT, gaps in your resume, disciplinary action in undergrad or anything else that you want to explain, this is where you would provide a brief explanation and any supporting evidence to show you have moved past the setback.

Contact Stacy Blackman Consulting for customized advice to give you that competitive edge in your Wharton application

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Wharton Fall 2016 MBA Essays Announced

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School has confirmed the essay questions that will form a part of the Fall 2016 MBA application. The prompts remain unchanged from the 2014-2015 admissions season. Required Essay What do …

Wharton essay questionsThe University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School has confirmed the essay questions that will form a part of the Fall 2016 MBA application. The prompts remain unchanged from the 2014-2015 admissions season.

Required Essay

What do you hope to gain both personally and professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

Optional Essay

Please use the space below to highlight any additional information that you would like the Admissions Committee to know about your candidacy. (400 words)

Reapplicant Question

All reapplicants to Wharton are required to complete this essay. Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). (250 words)

All applicants, including reapplicants, can also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

For more information, please visit the Wharton MBA admissions website.

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Wharton Fall 2016 MBA Application Deadlines

Survey Says Wharton Beats HBS in Satisfied MBAs

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