Tag Archives: Wharton School

Tuesday Tips: 2014 University of Pennsylvania Wharton Essay Tips

This year Wharton has streamlined the essay questions even further and asks only one required question for new applicants to the program. If you are a reapplicant there is an additional required question. The Wharton …

This year Wharton has streamlined the essay questions even further and asks only one required question for new applicants to the program. If you are a reapplicant there is an additional required question. The Wharton optional question is entirely open ended. This is a good opportunity to explain anything that may be unclear from your transcripts, recommendations, or resume. It could also be a place to discuss anything interesting about your personal background that you did not cover in the required question.

Required Question: What do you hope to gain both personally and professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

The career goals essay is a standard MBA prompt. Wharton has traditionally kept the career goals question focused entirely on professional goals, but this year expands this essay question to also include your personal goals for the MBA. This is certainly about fit with Wharton and to gauge more about your personality and potential success in the program.

Be careful to answer the specific question in this career goals essay. Notice that you are not asked about your professional background or your key accomplishments. To answer the question asked, you will want to focus mainly on the future and what you are planning to pursue with your MBA degree. At the same time, there is certainly room to add color by using your background information where it is most relevant to your goals. Think about the key moments of your professional life that crystallized your goals for you, and focus on illuminating those decision points rather than reciting your entire resume.

Wharton has asked a specific question about the Wharton culture in the last several years. Just because this question is missing does not mean you will get away without doing your research! Understanding exactly how you fit in will help you describe what Wharton will do for you, as well as navigate interviews and other interactions with the Wharton admissions committee. Consider including specific information from your Wharton research in this essay such as Wharton faculty you would like to study with or unique educational opportunities at Wharton.

When you address your personal goals for the MBA make sure you are making the case for Wharton specifically. Consider what living in Philadelphia might be like, the many clubs and student activities, and leadership development opportunities like traveling to Antarctica with your classmates that may address some of your personal life goals.

Reapplicant Essay: All reapplicants to Wharton are required to complete the Optional Essay. Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). You may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

All reapplicants are required to provide information that supports your renewed candidacy. The most successful version of the reapplicant essay will provide tangible evidence that you have improved the overall package you are submitting this year. Improvements like GMAT score or new quantitative classes as especially tangible, but a promotion, increase in responsibility at work, a job change or even a change of goals and mission can apply.

A rejection or waitlist last year is a form of feedback, and may have led to soul searching for you. When you describe your changes make sure reflect your ability to take feedback and improve. Describe how you approached the reapplication process after assessing your own strengths and weaknesses as a candidate and making the appropriate efforts to improve.

Optional Essay: Please use the space below to highlight any additional information that you would like the Admissions Committee to know about your candidacy. (400 words)

If you think that your application materials and the required essay are enough to provide a complete picture of your candidacy you may want to forgo this essay. There is no need to submit additional material just to submit something – consider whether the admissions committee will appreciate the information or think you are wasting their time.

If you do choose to answer this question note that the essay can be used for any topic that you would like. If there is something about your personal background you did not cover in the required essay and it is relevant and useful for your application, this is the place to cover it. Perhaps you didn’t have room in the required essay to describe an important accomplishment or to tell a story about your life that is relevant to your pursuit of an MBA. Anything that you think will be an asset to your application is fair game as a topic for this essay.

This is also a potential place to address any areas of concern in your application. If you have a low GPA or GMAT, gaps in your resume, disciplinary action in undergrad or anything else that you want to explain, this is where you would provide a brief explanation and any supporting evidence to show you have moved past the setback.

Stacy Blackman Consulting has over a decade of experience assisting candidates to achieve their Wharton MBA dreams. We offer customized advice, including specific preparation for the Wharton group interview, to give you a competitive edge. Contact us to learn more.

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Wharton School 2014-2015 MBA Essays

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School has announced the MBA essays for the upcoming admissions season. This year, there will be only one required essay. Class of 2017 Essays 1. (Required) What do you hope …

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School has announced the MBA essays for the upcoming admissions season. This year, there will be only one required essay.

Class of 2017 Essays

1. (Required) What do you hope to gain both personally and professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

2. (Optional) Please use the space below to highlight any additional information that you would like the Admissions Committee to know about your candidacy. (400 words)

Additional Question for Reapplicants:

All reapplicants to Wharton are required to complete the Optional Essay. Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). You may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words).

For more information, please visit the Wharton School admissions website.

Stay tuned for our essay analysis, coming soon!

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Wharton School 2014-2015 MBA Application Deadlines

Wharton School Names New Dean

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Wharton School Names New Dean

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School will welcome distinguished political economist Geoffrey Garrett as its newest dean, effective July 1st, the university announced today. A former faculty member in Wharton’s management department, Garrett is currently …

new wharton dean

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School will welcome distinguished political economist Geoffrey Garrett as its newest dean, effective July 1st, the university announced today. A former faculty member in Wharton’s management department, Garrett is currently dean and professor of business in the Australian School of Business at the University of New South Wales.

Before joining UNSW, Garrett served as dean of the Business School at the University of Sydney and as founding CEO of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, an important hub that brought together scholars of business, economics, politics and the humanities to deepen understanding of contemporary American issues across Australia and the Pacific Rim.

“Our selection of Geoff Garrett as the next dean of the Wharton School successfully concludes a global search to find a successor to Tom Robertson, who has served with distinction as dean since 2007,” said Penn President Amy Gutmann when announcing the news. “Geoff Garrett has a proven track record as an eminent interdisciplinary scholar and strong and collaborative strategic leader.”

“He has a deep understanding of Wharton’s distinctive mission and a compelling vision for the role of business schools in an era of rapid change and globalization. Geoff has unique experience in international business and business education and is absolutely the right person to partner with Wharton faculty, students, staff and alumni to take the School to even greater heights,” she added.

He served earlier as president of the Pacific Council on International Policy in Los Angeles and as a faculty member at the University of Southern California; as vice provost and dean of the UCLA International Institute; as director of the Leitner Program in International and Comparative Political Economy and director of the Ethics, Politics and Economics program at Yale; and as a faculty member at Wharton and at Oxford and Stanford universities.

A distinguished social scientist and expert on globalization, Garrett has authored or co-edited three books, written 45 scholarly articles, produced dozens of chapters and essays and contributed more than 100 opinion articles to newspapers around the world. He is a former Fulbright Scholar, and completed his master’s and doctoral degrees in political science at Duke University.

“It will be my honor and privilege to work with such fantastic colleagues, students and alumni at Wharton and all around the University,” Garrett said. “Like other sectors, globalization and technological change are poised to transform business education. I have no doubt Wharton will be in the vanguard of this transformation in America and around the world.”

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3-Way Tie in US News Best B-School Rankings

There was little movement and few surprises among the elite programs in the U.S. News ranking of the top business schools, announced today. Harvard Business School, Stanford Graduate School of Business, and the University of …

There was little movement and few surprises among the elite programs in the U.S. News ranking of the top business schools, announced today. Harvard Business School, Stanford Graduate School of Business, and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School share the number-one spot in the 2015 rankings.

Harvard and Stanford’s first-place tie remained the same as last year’s standings. This was the highest rank ever achieved by Wharton in the U.S. News survey; last year Wharton finished third.

Chicago Booth School of Business ranks No. 4, moving up two places over the previous year, MIT Sloan School of Management takes fifth place, while Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management fell two spots to No. 6 in the 2015 standings, according to the report.

The top ten is rounded out by UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, Columbia Business School, Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, and, No. 10, NYU Stern School of Business.

11. Michigan Ross School of Business
12. UV Darden School of Business
13. Yale School of Management
14. Duke’s Fuqua School of Business
15. UT McCombs School of Business
16. UCLA Anderson School of Management
17. Cornell’s Johnson School
18. CMU Tepper School of Business
19. UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School
20. Emory University’s Goizueta Business School

The U.S. News rankings are based on a weighted average of several indicators, including overall program quality, peer assessments, recruiter assessments, placement success, starting salary and bonus, average GMAT/GRE score, undergraduate GPA and more.

To compile this year’s rankings, all 453 master’s programs accredited by AACSB International were surveyed in fall 2013 and early 2014. A total of 385 responded, of which 127 provided enough of the data needed to calculate the full-time MBA rankings.

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Weigh Trying a MOOC Before an MBA

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com 2013 may well become known as the year of the massive open online course, commonly abbreviated MOOC, as more and more prestigious business …

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com

2013 may well become known as the year of the massive open online course, commonly abbreviated MOOC, as more and more prestigious business schools began offering their courses for free to anyone in the world with an Internet connection.

Stanford Graduate School of Business, University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, Michigan’s Ross School of Business and Spain’s IE Business School are just a few of the top MBA programs bringing their courses to the people, and it seems more are joining the party every month.

Most elite schools use the Palo Alto-based education company Coursera to host their MOOC content. While universities don’t offer official credit for their MOOCs, some offer participants a certificate – either free or for a fee – confirming completion of the course and a demonstrated understanding of the material.

In the fall, the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, Harvard Business School and HEC Paris announced they will offer numerous MOOCs as a way to enhance the academic experience and allow teaching to go beyond the confines of the classroom. HEC Paris is the first business school in France to launch a MOOC and will offer two courses, European law and corporate finance, in early spring 2014.

When announcing the news, HEC Dean Bernard Ramanantsoa said, “This partnership with Coursera offers HEC an opportunity to open up our courses to people who might not usually have access to higher education, whether for practical or economic considerations. Sharing our faculty’s expertise with the general public at no cost is a truly exciting and meaningful challenge.”

Meanwhile, with the Wharton MBA Foundation Series, faculty teach four core classes in financial accounting, operations management, marketing and corporate finance, allowing students all over the world to learn the same material a first-year Wharton MBA student would.

“This is the first time that a business school has bundled a collection of MOOCs together in this fashion,” Don Huesman, managing director of the innovation group at Wharton, told Bloomberg Businessweek in September. “We’re taking our core required classes in the MBA program, with the same instructors, to provide those same core concepts.”

Harvard Business School is playing it close to the vest with its initial foray into online education, perhaps because it must consider how to impart its knowledge to the masses without tarnishing the school’s venerable brand.

Brian C. Kenny, chief marketing and communications officer for HBS, told The Chronicle of Higher Education that the school needs to figure out how to translate its signature pedagogical technique, the case method, to an online educational experience.

“Whether or not the case method can work online,” said Kenny, “is a question that we haven’t answered yet.”

For its part, Darden has upcoming courses in foundations of business strategy, smart growth for private businesses, design thinking for business innovation and new models of business in society. Darden’s Dean Bob Bruner remarked in an interview that the school is proud to be one of the most active schools in online learning.

“Everyone says ‘you’re a business school, why are you giving it away for free,'” Bruner said, but he explains that “MOOCs are consistent with our mission and we’re learning a great deal about digital instruction with practice.”

These online courses may also be one of the best marketing tools the schools have at their fingertips. As Bruner noted, MOOCs are “helping a part of the world to learn about Darden, a population that was pretty much oblivious to the existence of the school beforehand.”

For MBA applicants wondering whether to enroll in a MOOC at one of their target schools, I say go for it. There’s no harm in getting an early taste of the course work to come, and the experience might actually help inform your decision to apply or allow you to reference something concrete about the curriculum in your essays.

The courses typically require a high level of motivation to complete, and doing so shows a commitment to self-improvement the admissions committee would find laudable.

Just don’t make the mistake of thinking that completing a set of MOOCs from Wharton will put you in the same league as a student on campus. The conversations that occur in class and out, and the networking opportunities business school provides, remain the most valuable aspects of the MBA experience.

No one is exactly sure yet how free online courses factor into the world of students, nonstudents and applicants. Does it merely offer a taste of the school, or will it one day replace live classes? Right now, this kind of online learning is still in its infancy, but it is a very real part of the education world and good to experiment with rather than ignore.

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Dean Spotlight: Wharton School’s Thomas Robertson

Whether you’re in the midst of the school selection process or have already applied, it may be helpful to have some background on those who are at the helm of some of the top-ranked MBA …

Wharton Dean Thomas Robertson

Whether you’re in the midst of the school selection process or have already applied, it may be helpful to have some background on those who are at the helm of some of the top-ranked MBA programs. Today, we’ll highlight Thomas S. Robertson, who has held the position of dean at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School since August 2007.  In April 2013, he announced his plans to step down in June 2014, when his term ends.

A seasoned business school administrator and a member of the Wharton faculty from 1971 to 1994, he has long been a champion of international and interdisciplinary education. Since returning to Wharton as dean, his focus has been to expand Penn’s global footprint while advancing Wharton as a force for social and economic good. Robertson’s primary areas of focus while dean have been innovation, global initiatives, and social impact.

From 1994 to 1998, he was Sainsbury Professor, Chair of Marketing, and Deputy Dean of the London Business School in charge of the school’s portfolio of degree and non-degree programs. Robertson was Dean of Emory’s Goizueta Business School from 1998 to 2004, and is widely credited with positioning the school as an international leader in business education.

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