Tag Archives: Wharton School

Wharton School Names New Dean

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School will welcome distinguished political economist Geoffrey Garrett as its newest dean, effective July 1st, the university announced today. A former faculty member in Wharton’s management department, Garrett is currently …

new wharton dean

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School will welcome distinguished political economist Geoffrey Garrett as its newest dean, effective July 1st, the university announced today. A former faculty member in Wharton’s management department, Garrett is currently dean and professor of business in the Australian School of Business at the University of New South Wales.

Before joining UNSW, Garrett served as dean of the Business School at the University of Sydney and as founding CEO of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, an important hub that brought together scholars of business, economics, politics and the humanities to deepen understanding of contemporary American issues across Australia and the Pacific Rim.

“Our selection of Geoff Garrett as the next dean of the Wharton School successfully concludes a global search to find a successor to Tom Robertson, who has served with distinction as dean since 2007,” said Penn President Amy Gutmann when announcing the news. “Geoff Garrett has a proven track record as an eminent interdisciplinary scholar and strong and collaborative strategic leader.”

“He has a deep understanding of Wharton’s distinctive mission and a compelling vision for the role of business schools in an era of rapid change and globalization. Geoff has unique experience in international business and business education and is absolutely the right person to partner with Wharton faculty, students, staff and alumni to take the School to even greater heights,” she added.

He served earlier as president of the Pacific Council on International Policy in Los Angeles and as a faculty member at the University of Southern California; as vice provost and dean of the UCLA International Institute; as director of the Leitner Program in International and Comparative Political Economy and director of the Ethics, Politics and Economics program at Yale; and as a faculty member at Wharton and at Oxford and Stanford universities.

A distinguished social scientist and expert on globalization, Garrett has authored or co-edited three books, written 45 scholarly articles, produced dozens of chapters and essays and contributed more than 100 opinion articles to newspapers around the world. He is a former Fulbright Scholar, and completed his master’s and doctoral degrees in political science at Duke University.

“It will be my honor and privilege to work with such fantastic colleagues, students and alumni at Wharton and all around the University,” Garrett said. “Like other sectors, globalization and technological change are poised to transform business education. I have no doubt Wharton will be in the vanguard of this transformation in America and around the world.”

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3-Way Tie in US News Best B-School Rankings

There was little movement and few surprises among the elite programs in the U.S. News ranking of the top business schools, announced today. Harvard Business School, Stanford Graduate School of Business, and the University of …

There was little movement and few surprises among the elite programs in the U.S. News ranking of the top business schools, announced today. Harvard Business School, Stanford Graduate School of Business, and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School share the number-one spot in the 2015 rankings.

Harvard and Stanford’s first-place tie remained the same as last year’s standings. This was the highest rank ever achieved by Wharton in the U.S. News survey; last year Wharton finished third.

Chicago Booth School of Business ranks No. 4, moving up two places over the previous year, MIT Sloan School of Management takes fifth place, while Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management fell two spots to No. 6 in the 2015 standings, according to the report.

The top ten is rounded out by UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, Columbia Business School, Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, and, No. 10, NYU Stern School of Business.

11. Michigan Ross School of Business
12. UV Darden School of Business
13. Yale School of Management
14. Duke’s Fuqua School of Business
15. UT McCombs School of Business
16. UCLA Anderson School of Management
17. Cornell’s Johnson School
18. CMU Tepper School of Business
19. UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School
20. Emory University’s Goizueta Business School

The U.S. News rankings are based on a weighted average of several indicators, including overall program quality, peer assessments, recruiter assessments, placement success, starting salary and bonus, average GMAT/GRE score, undergraduate GPA and more.

To compile this year’s rankings, all 453 master’s programs accredited by AACSB International were surveyed in fall 2013 and early 2014. A total of 385 responded, of which 127 provided enough of the data needed to calculate the full-time MBA rankings.

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Weigh Trying a MOOC Before an MBA

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com 2013 may well become known as the year of the massive open online course, commonly abbreviated MOOC, as more and more prestigious business …

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com

2013 may well become known as the year of the massive open online course, commonly abbreviated MOOC, as more and more prestigious business schools began offering their courses for free to anyone in the world with an Internet connection.

Stanford Graduate School of Business, University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, Michigan’s Ross School of Business and Spain’s IE Business School are just a few of the top MBA programs bringing their courses to the people, and it seems more are joining the party every month.

Most elite schools use the Palo Alto-based education company Coursera to host their MOOC content. While universities don’t offer official credit for their MOOCs, some offer participants a certificate – either free or for a fee – confirming completion of the course and a demonstrated understanding of the material.

In the fall, the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, Harvard Business School and HEC Paris announced they will offer numerous MOOCs as a way to enhance the academic experience and allow teaching to go beyond the confines of the classroom. HEC Paris is the first business school in France to launch a MOOC and will offer two courses, European law and corporate finance, in early spring 2014.

When announcing the news, HEC Dean Bernard Ramanantsoa said, “This partnership with Coursera offers HEC an opportunity to open up our courses to people who might not usually have access to higher education, whether for practical or economic considerations. Sharing our faculty’s expertise with the general public at no cost is a truly exciting and meaningful challenge.”

Meanwhile, with the Wharton MBA Foundation Series, faculty teach four core classes in financial accounting, operations management, marketing and corporate finance, allowing students all over the world to learn the same material a first-year Wharton MBA student would.

“This is the first time that a business school has bundled a collection of MOOCs together in this fashion,” Don Huesman, managing director of the innovation group at Wharton, told Bloomberg Businessweek in September. “We’re taking our core required classes in the MBA program, with the same instructors, to provide those same core concepts.”

Harvard Business School is playing it close to the vest with its initial foray into online education, perhaps because it must consider how to impart its knowledge to the masses without tarnishing the school’s venerable brand.

Brian C. Kenny, chief marketing and communications officer for HBS, told The Chronicle of Higher Education that the school needs to figure out how to translate its signature pedagogical technique, the case method, to an online educational experience.

“Whether or not the case method can work online,” said Kenny, “is a question that we haven’t answered yet.”

For its part, Darden has upcoming courses in foundations of business strategy, smart growth for private businesses, design thinking for business innovation and new models of business in society. Darden’s Dean Bob Bruner remarked in an interview that the school is proud to be one of the most active schools in online learning.

“Everyone says ‘you’re a business school, why are you giving it away for free,'” Bruner said, but he explains that “MOOCs are consistent with our mission and we’re learning a great deal about digital instruction with practice.”

These online courses may also be one of the best marketing tools the schools have at their fingertips. As Bruner noted, MOOCs are “helping a part of the world to learn about Darden, a population that was pretty much oblivious to the existence of the school beforehand.”

For MBA applicants wondering whether to enroll in a MOOC at one of their target schools, I say go for it. There’s no harm in getting an early taste of the course work to come, and the experience might actually help inform your decision to apply or allow you to reference something concrete about the curriculum in your essays.

The courses typically require a high level of motivation to complete, and doing so shows a commitment to self-improvement the admissions committee would find laudable.

Just don’t make the mistake of thinking that completing a set of MOOCs from Wharton will put you in the same league as a student on campus. The conversations that occur in class and out, and the networking opportunities business school provides, remain the most valuable aspects of the MBA experience.

No one is exactly sure yet how free online courses factor into the world of students, nonstudents and applicants. Does it merely offer a taste of the school, or will it one day replace live classes? Right now, this kind of online learning is still in its infancy, but it is a very real part of the education world and good to experiment with rather than ignore.

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Dean Spotlight: Wharton School’s Thomas Robertson

Whether you’re in the midst of the school selection process or have already applied, it may be helpful to have some background on those who are at the helm of some of the top-ranked MBA …

Wharton Dean Thomas Robertson

Whether you’re in the midst of the school selection process or have already applied, it may be helpful to have some background on those who are at the helm of some of the top-ranked MBA programs. Today, we’ll highlight Thomas S. Robertson, who has held the position of dean at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School since August 2007.  In April 2013, he announced his plans to step down in June 2014, when his term ends.

A seasoned business school administrator and a member of the Wharton faculty from 1971 to 1994, he has long been a champion of international and interdisciplinary education. Since returning to Wharton as dean, his focus has been to expand Penn’s global footprint while advancing Wharton as a force for social and economic good. Robertson’s primary areas of focus while dean have been innovation, global initiatives, and social impact.

From 1994 to 1998, he was Sainsbury Professor, Chair of Marketing, and Deputy Dean of the London Business School in charge of the school’s portfolio of degree and non-degree programs. Robertson was Dean of Emory’s Goizueta Business School from 1998 to 2004, and is widely credited with positioning the school as an international leader in business education.

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Wharton’s Team-Based Discussion, Demystified

In her first post to the admissions blog following Ankur Kumar‘s departure last week, Wharton School‘s deputy vice dean for MBA admissions, Maryellen Lamb, provided a thorough walk-through of the team-based discussion component and shared …

In her first post to the admissions blog following Ankur Kumar‘s departure last week, Wharton School‘s deputy vice dean for MBA admissions, Maryellen Lamb, provided a thorough walk-through of the team-based discussion component and shared news of an uptick in R1 applications this season.

So, what’s this team-based exercise? Invited candidates will have the chance to work together with a handful of their fellow applicants to solve real-world business scenarios as a team. According to the school, this exercise demonstrates how they approach and analyze specific situations and interact with other people, two critical components of Wharton’s team-focused learning style.

Despite applicants’ natural trepidation, Lamb says there are 837 first-years on campus who survived the experience and actually enjoyed it. Here, she shares the nitty gritty of this new interview format:

  • As with our one-on-one interview, Team-Based Discussion will be by invitation only. Participation is required to complete the admissions process.
  • Each Team-Based Discussion will be comprised of 5-6 applicants. Teams will be a function of who signs up – there is no ‘crafting’ done on our end. The discussion will have a prompt and a purpose – that is, there is a tangible outcome you will be working towards.
  • Applicants selected to interview will receive the Team-Based Discussion prompt prior to their interview.  We recommend that you spend about an hour in advance preparing for the discussion.
  • Candidates will continue to have an opportunity for a short individual conversation with an Admissions team member, which will follow the Team-Based Discussion exercise.
  • The majority of Team-Based Discussion interviews will continue to be held on-campus and conducted by our Admissions Fellows, a select group of second-year students. We encourage you to take advantage of our visit program when you come to campus to experience life at Wharton firsthand.
  • During each evaluation round we will continue to host Team-Based Discussions in select cities around the world. These sessions will be conducted by Admissions officers.
  • On- and off-campus Team-Based Discussions will be conducted in the same way and considered equally. There is no ‘advantage’ in choosing either option.

“…Interviewees came away from the day impressed by the type of students that they could be in class with and gained a group of contacts going through a similar experience,” Lamb says. “The early camaraderie was an unintended effect, but one we enjoyed witnessing throughout the process.”

***

Stacy Blackman Consulting has introduced live group practice sessions this year to help applicants with this fun but challenging new interview format. Find out more about our interview prep options with moderators who have admissions experience at both Wharton and Michigan Ross School of Business, which has also introduced an optional, though strongly encouraged, group exercise component.

You may also be interested in:

Wharton’s MBA Director on New Team-Based Discussion

Wharton Introduces New Component to MBA Application

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Admissions Upheaval at UPenn Wharton School

After nearly five years in MBA admissions at the Wharton School, director Ankur Kumar has decided to leave her post, effective tomorrow. In an entry posted on the admissions blog, Kumar gives notice of her …

After nearly five years in MBA admissions at the Wharton School, director Ankur Kumar has decided to leave her post, effective tomorrow. In an entry posted on the admissions blog, Kumar gives notice of her departure to applicants and explains that the timing of her leave—which comes just days after the round one deadline October 1st—is because she didn’t want to leave in the middle of this year’s application cycle.

In July, Bloomberg Businessweek reported on the sharp drop in applications to Wharton last year, down 6 percent while other top ten schools reported increases, making many wonder about the timing of her decision to move on to other, non-specified, ventures.

Kumar denies the connection, telling Businessweek Wednesday that this decision is unrelated and “absolutely not” the reason she’s leaving. Rather, she indicates the new team-based admissions interview likely scared off many applicants. Deputy Vice Dean Maryellen Lamb will replace Kumar, at least temporarily, the school said in a memo distributed by Dean Tom Robertson and Vice Dean Howie Kaufold.

The spotlight first hit Wharton in the Wall Street Journal‘s September 27th story, What’s Wrong with Wharton?” Melissa Korn‘s piece attributes much of the school’s current troubles to its sluggish reaction during the financial crisis. Long known as a top feeder to Wall Street, Wharton’s finance-focused students struggled when it came time to find work in investment banks and brokerage firms post-MBA.

Meanwhile, “Top institutions—and the Philadelphia-based school is still in that class—responded to the downturn by restructuring their courses and seeking students from less-traditional business backgrounds,” Korn explains.

Despite all the seemingly bad press, the outlook for Wharton is still solid, notes editor John Byrne of Poets& Quants. The school continues to increase female enrollment at a higher percentage than either Harvard or Stanford, and surpassed all previous job placement records this year, with 97.8% of the class landing an offer three months after graduation.

There’s a lot of interesting information, and sometimes contradictory opinions, reported in each of these stories linked above. We encourage applicants to explore the issue further if Wharton is on your short-list of schools.

 

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