Tag Archives: Haas School of Business

Tepper Crowned Best Part-Time MBA Program

Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business takes the top spot in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2013 ranking of the best part-time MBA programs. With a close-knit cohort of just 194 students in the program, this part-time …

Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business takes the top spot in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2013 ranking of the best part-time MBA programs. With a close-knit cohort of just 194 students in the program, this part-time curriculum is the same as the full-time version but is completed in three years instead of two.

This is the first time the Tepper School lands the coveted top spot, having finished in third place in the 2011 rankings and seventh in 2009.

“Eighty-seven percent of Tepper grads reported a salary increase, the highest percentage of any school in the ranking, and the Pittsburgh-based B-school scored in the top 10 of all three ranking measures,” Businessweek reveals.

Coming in a close second was UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, which is considerably larger with 800 students in the part-time program. The Haas School ranked fifth in the 2011 survey, and the school notes that surveyed graduates from the class of 2013 gave Haas an A+ for teaching quality, an A+ for caliber of classmates, and an A+ for curriculum.

Top Ten Part-Time MBA Programs

  1. Tepper School of Business
  2. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  3. Cox School of Business (Southwestern Methodist University)
  4. UCLA Anderson School of Management
  5. Love School of Business (Elon University)
  6. College of Business Administration (Loyola Marymount University)
  7. Jones Graduate School of Business (Rice University)
  8. Chicago Booth School of Business
  9. Crummer Graduate School of Business (Rollins College)
  10. Michigan Ross School of Business

Businessweek explains that their biennial part-time ranking, first conducted in 2007, is unique in that it separates schools into six geographic regions, and ranks each separately, since the part-time MBA format doesn’t lend itself to traveling long distances multiple times a week.

The ranking is based on a poll of the graduating class of 2013, which accounts for 40% of the results; an academic quality measure, which accounts for 30%; and post-graduation outcomes, which measure whether the schools were completely responsible for helping students achieve their career goals and account for 30% of the ranking.

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Berkeley-Columbia Executive MBA Program to Close in 2013

Deans from the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, and Columbia Business School announced today that the Berkeley-Columbia Executive MBA Program will come to closure in February 2013 when the current …

Deans from the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, and Columbia Business School announced today that the Berkeley-Columbia Executive MBA Program will come to closure in February 2013 when the current class graduates.

Rich Lyons, professor of economics and finance and dean of Berkeley-Haas, and Glenn Hubbard, Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics and dean of Columbia Business School, said the joint decision was reached in recognition of each school’s goals and future direction.

The Haas School plans to launch a stand-alone MBA for Executives program in 2013, in addition to its Full-time MBA and Evening & Weekend MBA programs.

Columbia Business School recently launched a Saturday-only delivery option to augment its EMBA-New York program, in addition to its EMBA-Global partnership programs with London Business School and University of Hong Kong and full-time MBA program.

Current students in the Berkeley-Columbia Executive MBA Program will continue taking classes at both schools’ campuses.   As with prior graduates of the joint program, the Class of 2013 will be awarded MBA degrees from both Columbia and Berkeley and will become part of the alumni networks of both schools.

Prospective students who have been admitted to enter the Berkeley-Columbia Program in May 2012 will be offered three options:  1) enter any of Columbia Business School’s EMBA programs, 2) enter the Berkeley Evening & Weekend MBA Program at the Haas School, or 3) enter the new Berkeley MBA Program for Executives when it begins in 2013.

The Berkeley-Columbia EMBA Program, which enrolled its first class in May 2002, will have graduated over 600 students when it concludes next year.  It is taught equally by Berkeley-Haas and Columbia Business School faculty in classes held on both the Berkeley and Columbia campuses.   The Berkeley-Columbia EMBA program spans 19 months with classes starting in May and ending in December of the following year.  Commencement takes place in February.

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New Spring Courses at UC Berkeley-Haas

To further its mission of creating “pathbending” leaders, UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business has introduced new courses this spring that reflect recent attitude shifts on issues ranging from social and environmental challenges to marketing, …

To further its mission of creating “pathbending” leaders, UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business has introduced new courses this spring that reflect recent attitude shifts on issues ranging from social and environmental challenges to marketing, innovation, and more.

For full-time MBA students, professor David Vogel‘s two-unit course on Environmental Management and Policy will explore how corporations can both cause and improve environmental problems, and how public policy can both facilitate and constrain improvements.

A one-unit seminar on Ethics and Decision Making in Green Product Design, taught by Associate Professor Christine Rosen, will examine the social, political, legal and business issues raised by our increasing awareness of impacts on human health and the environment.

Students of both the full-time MBA and Evening & Weekend MBA programs may choose professor Jennifer Chatman‘s new elective on Leadership.  The course will feature a series of live cases run by high-profile executives, and includes self-assessments that give students a better understanding of their strengths and challenges as developing leaders.

For students in the Evening & Weekend MBA program and the Berkeley-Columbia Executive MBA program, the school will offer a semester-long immersion into the roles and responsibilities of innovation managers in Bill Pearce‘s Design and Marketing New Products.

Students entrepreneurs can make their big idea a reality in The Lean LaunchPad, taught by serial entrepreneur Steve Blank. A proponent of agile development and lean startups, Blank will guide students in building and launching a company in one semester.

Finally, professor David Teece will lay out a new approach to management based on his “dynamic capabilities” theory in the two-unit course, Strategic Management and Innovation: Knowledge, Intellectual Capital & Competitive Advantage.

With six new courses available to full-time MBA, Evening & Weekend MBA, and Berkeley-Columbia Executive MBA students, plus five additional courses and two workshops introduced at the undergraduate level, UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business appears dedicated to providing tomorrow’s leaders with the tools they will need to solve the thorniest management challenges.

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SBC Scoop: Explaining a Layoff

*Please note that no client details are ever shared in SBC Scoop or otherwise without complete sign off from client. Today is the third year anniversary of the Lehman collapse, which sent a ripple of …

*Please note that no client details are ever shared in SBC Scoop or otherwise without complete sign off from client.

Today is the third year anniversary of the Lehman collapse, which sent a ripple of unemployment through the financial sector. In the past, unemployment was a red flag that required conscious mitigation. Now, business schools realize that even the best employees may have gone through a period without work over the last three years.

Christian wasn’t hit personally by the financial crisis, but he was an analyst at a large social media website that ultimately couldn’t compete with facebook. Due to the credit crunch, the parent corporation no longer had the patience to withstand huge losses from this website in 2009, and decided to lay off 50% of the workforce.

Other than his unemployment, Christian was a strong candidate with a 3.7 GPA from Emory and a 740 GMAT score. His work experience showed progression in the form of a promotion from Analyst to Sr. Analyst at his company in only 18 months. He had spent another two years at the social networking site before the round of layoffs.

When we started working with Christian he was still unemployed and had decided to use his time to start his own business. He was working on a niche retail website in his spare time, and volunteering with an organization called Taproot to keep his strategy skills fresh. Christian wanted to pursue his MBA to give him a basis in Marketing and Accounting that would help him operate his own company. He wanted to stay in the bay area and was only applying to Haas and Stanford.

The key aspect that helped us shape Christian’s profile was that he had remained busy and optimistic. Christian saw the layoff as an opportunity to pursue a dream of entrepreneurship. This was a story that could be told easily in his applications, and we focused one essay on how he wrote a business plan for his retail site, and the networking he did to understand the overall industry and the market size for his target audience. This story showed that he was determined, hard working, and able to use his people skills to expand his network.

The volunteer work that Christian was heavily involved in gave him an opportunity to cite recent teamwork. He also showed that he was interested in giving back, even while he went through tough times himself. We used the optional essay and his recommendations to show that he was a top performer who simply ended up at an unprofitable company. In his essays about work he was able to show that he had learned a lot about business from being part of a failed company. Overall, Christian showed that he had the grit to persevere through a difficult experience ”“ a quality that is in high demand within MBA programs.

Despite his unemployment Christian was admitted to Haas where he made the most of the opportunity to become an expert on Marketing and Accounting for his start-up.

To read more SBC Case Studies, click HERE.

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$1M Gift Will Fund Online Learning at UC Berkeley/Haas

The Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley announced last week that it has received funding to blend online education with traditional classroom learning, thanks to the $1 million set aside by the Chamberlin Family …

The Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley announced last week that it has received funding to blend online education with traditional classroom learning, thanks to the $1 million set aside by the Chamberlin Family Donor Designated Fund.

Created by Steve and Susan Chamberlin, former members of the Haas School of Business professional faculty, the funds will be shared by UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering, the Graduate School of Education, the Haas School, the School of Information, and the School of Public Health, as well as UC Berkeley Extension. These schools have formed a consortium to share knowledge, develop unique programming, and realize efficiencies.

“I hope this gift is the catalyst that launches UC Berkeley on the path to being the best in the online space,” says Steve Chamberlin. “It’s less important to be first than to develop the background and the qualitative measures to do online education really well.”

Noting that students today are “digital natives” who expect to be able to learn through an online platform, Adam Berman, the Haas School’s executive director of emerging initiatives, says, “Technology has progressed to the point where online education is no longer a pale substitute for the traditional lecture hall. Advanced learning platforms, rich media, social networks and mobile devices allow for highly interactive learning communities online, as well as a customized, results-oriented experience for each student.”

Through the use of both online and traditional course formats, Jay Stowsky, senior assistant dean for instruction, says the Haas School will be at the forefront of professional business education by expanding student access to the school’s world-class faculty.

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Students Influence Business School Brands

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News — Strictly Business blog. What brand image comes to mind when you think of Harvard Business School? Is it the same image for the Haas School of …

This post originally appeared on the U.S. News — Strictly Business blog.

What brand image comes to mind when you think of Harvard Business School? Is it the same image for the Haas School of Business at the University of California””Berkeley, or the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business? Every elite management program has its own distinct brand, which has relatively little to do with rankings or test scores and everything to do with the school’s culture and mindset.

Then along came social media, a seismic disturbance to the status quo. In today’s über-networked world, business schools no longer have any ability to control their brand image in cyberspace.

The latest issue of Graduate Management News takes a look at this intersection of students, social media, school branding, and admissions. At the Graduate Management Admission Council‘s annual conference last month in Boston, panel moderator Rich D’Amato, GMAC’s vice president of global communications, confirmed what business schools have long feared: The school is no longer the sole source of news, and the story is in the hands of students and faculty in ways it hasn’t been before. To address that new reality, the conference hosted three distinct sessions related to using the latest social media tools.

A session titled “Lose Control, Get Attention: The Art of Getting Noticed in a Socially Networked News Cycle” covered the overlapping worlds of mainstream and social media, as well as the importance of authentic student voices in social media. D’Amato told admissions and other business school professionals that schools need to “engage the social media space directly, consistently, openly, and happily”¦otherwise, the school’s story, news, and brand will wind up under someone else’s control.”

Panelist Omar Wasaw, a Harvard Ph.D. candidate and internet pioneer, urged attendees to recast their thinking of the issue, saying: “It’s not so much losing control””it’s that your role is changing from facilitator to director”¦The trick is, how do you create the infrastructure and get out of the way?”

Tom Rose, a recent graduate of the MIT Sloan School of Management who spoke on the panel with classmate Miro Kazakoff, called student voices in social media “unmined gold” for business schools. Both said endorsements from MIT alumni found through social media were a major factor in their decisions to enroll. The duo started the irreverent video blog The M.B.A. Show while at Sloan, and as Kazakoff acknowledged, “Despite our silliness, we realize we are yoked to our school.”

Whether the content comes from school-hosted student blogs, independent M.B.A. student bloggers, YouTube videos, Twitter, or on Facebook, business schools must accept that the fastest way to update their brand is to relinquish control of it. At last year’s Social Integration Conference in New York, HBS’s Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Brian Kenny noted that the benefits of using these platforms to promote faculty work and outreach to prospective students outweigh the occasional run-ins with inappropriate””or downright embarrassing””content.

Panelist Ken White, executive director of marketing communications at the University of Maryland Smith School of Business, thinks schools shouldn’t worry too much about what students may say or do via social media channels. Business students have made a considerable investment in order to benefit from a certain school brand and culture. They recognize that their personal brands and the school’s brand are intertwined””and the stronger the school’s brand, the stronger their own, White said.

Making that connection between the school’s and the students’ brands is vital, because the truth is, the school is its customers (i.e., the students). The top M.B.A. programs wouldn’t be positioned as they are if not for the graduates who have gone on to do great things. As Wasaw noted at the conference, current students have a stake in the quality of future students. Therefore, they do own and should influence the brand.

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