Stanford GSB Names New Asst. Dean of MBA Admissions

The Stanford Graduate School of Business has named Kirsten Moss as the new Assistant Dean and Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. In this role, Moss will oversee and manage Stanford GSB’s admissions and financial …

The Stanford Graduate School of Business has named Kirsten Moss as the new Assistant Dean and Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. In this role, Moss will oversee and manage Stanford GSB’s admissions and financial aid team and map out a vision for reaching, recruiting and selecting top MBA candidates.

Moss previously served in several roles within the Stanford GSB MBA Admissions team, including Director of MBA Admissions and Associate Director of Evaluation. During her tenure, Moss managed the evaluation, marketing and operations teams and developed a new approach to assessing leadership capability.

Prior to joining Stanford GSB, Moss worked at Harvard Business School as Managing Director, MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. Moss has also held positions in corporate consulting and finance.

“Kirsten has deep experience in admissions and leadership talent evaluation both inside and outside Stanford GSB,” says Senior Academic Dean Yossi Feinberg, who chaired the selection process. “Throughout our search process, Kirsten demonstrated her expertise and commitment to helping Stanford GSB continue to attract and develop the future leaders of tomorrow. I have every confidence that Kirsten will continue the MBA’s strong trajectory.”

Moss succeeds Derrick Bolton, who served as Assistant Dean for MBA Admissions and Financial Aid for 15 years before accepting a new position in September 2016 as Dean of Admissions for Stanford’s Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program.

“Kirsten has a strong understanding of our school’s vision and immediately impressed us with her ideas for connecting with the next generation of students making a positive, measurable difference in the world,” says Jonathan Levin, Philip H. Knight Professor and Dean of Stanford GSB. “Kirsten brings a wealth of knowledge and experience—from top-tier MBA admissions programs to business consulting—and will provide fresh insight as we achieve new levels of excellence.”

“Stanford GSB has a rich legacy of equipping students with the tools necessary to create change—individually, within organizations and throughout the world,” says Moss. “I’m thrilled to join the team in this new capacity as we work together to cultivate the next generation of leaders poised to make an impact.”

Moss earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University, an MBA from Harvard Business School, and is currently pursuing a Doctorate of Psychology from William James College.

Moss’s appointment will begin June 1.

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New Degree Program in Business Analytics at UCLA Anderson

UCLA’s Anderson School of Management has launched a new academic degree program, the Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA), beginning in the fall. Through innovative curriculum designed specifically for this 13-month program, students will be …

UCLA’s Anderson School of Management has launched a new academic degree program, the Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA), beginning in the fall. Through innovative curriculum designed specifically for this 13-month program, students will be prepared to extract business insights from the vast data available in the global marketplace.

“Today’s most innovative companies deal with a phenomenal amount of digital information that informs every aspect of an organization’s operations, from marketing and sales to customer base and market opportunities,” says UCLA Anderson Dean Judy. D. Olian.

The demand for talent that can make sense of the data and extract insights and advantages is at a premium today, Olian says.

The 2017 Big Data Executive Survey by NewVantage Partners found that 85% of Fortune 500 companies have either launched big data projects or are planning to do so. McKinsey Global Institute estimates that by 2018, the U.S. could face a shortage of 140,000 to 190,000 workers with deep analytical skills, and a potential shortfall of 1.5 million “data-savvy” managers and analysts.

With such market demands as a backdrop, the UCLA Anderson MSBA program combines theory and application in a number of critical areas, beginning with deep understanding of mathematics, statistics, programming and data management, then moving on to specific applications of business analytics that include customer analytics, operations analytics and competitive analytics.

Whether in health care, consumer products, sports and entertainment or information services, data analytics are a vital necessity to maintain market positions and to innovate.

Courses will be taught by members of Anderson’s faculty and other experts, who will infuse the classroom experience with the latest research and with their own experience from consulting with industry. UCLA Anderson is also home to the Morrison Family Center for Marketing Studies and Data Analytics, which will support the new degree program.

“Our MSBA program provides students with a first-rate academic experience that meshes a technically focused and rigorous experience with action learning, internships and field study projects,” says Associate Professor of Decisions, Operations and Technology Management Felipe Caro, the faculty director of the new degree program.

“Those who graduate from the program will be ready to take on the urgent challenges companies face when attempting to exploit the implications of their data.”

Applications will become available in late March.

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Applicants Should Connect with Alumni, Says UCLA Anderson Dean

One of the most valuable aspects of attending a top-ranked MBA program is the amazing network you cultivate during those two years. The MBA Insiders Blog at UCLA Anderson School of Management has just published a …

UCLA Anderson application tips

One of the most valuable aspects of attending a top-ranked MBA program is the amazing network you cultivate during those two years. The MBA Insiders Blog at UCLA Anderson School of Management has just published a helpful article noting how your interactions with the alumni of your target MBA programs can help you determine whether the school is a good fit for your personality and career goals.

Alumni can usually provide the most honest opinion on which courses will translate into future job opportunities, and point out which social opportunities allow you to really connect with other students outside of the classroom to help build that network foundation.

Alex Lawrence, Assistant Dean & Director of Admissions for the Full-Time MBA Program, writes this latest post in Anderson’s From the Dean’s Desk series, and below are his top 5 reasons why you should connect with alumni during your application process.

  1. Experience the school culture. Each school has its own culture and climate. Speaking with alumni allows you to experience that culture first hand. You can also ask what type of people attend the school (bankers, consultants, marketers, teachers). Ask if it is a competitive environment, do people support each other, is diversity and inclusion valued at the school, etc.
  2. Get advice on best way to visit campus /see program in full action. Alumni can provide great advice on how to structure your visit, how to contact
    faculty, meet with students, possibly sit in on a class, etc.
  3. Gain insights into career options and opportunities. One of the top reasons you are going to business school is to advance your career. Alumni are great resources to understand the impact of the school’s career management center on his/her career, what companies recruit/hire students at that school, learn about the career outcomes of other alumni.
  4. Provide a window into specific experiences. Business school is not just about taking classes. It is a wonderful way to test your limits and get out of your comfort zone. Alumni can provide a “window” into specific experiences for consideration – favorite courses, school faculty, classmates, global experiences, signature conferences, academic internships, community service, etc.
  5. Get answers to the “I didn’t know what I didn’t know” questions. Alumni can provide information that’s otherwise hard to find, such as answers to questions about financing your MBA and learning about pre-MBA internship opportunities.

The best way to reach out to alumni is through friends, family and colleagues, since that connection will incentivize them to give you a really honest insider’s perspective. If you can’t get in touch with anyone directly, reach out to the schools themselves and they’ll be able to put you in touch with someone willing to talk to you.

Nothing compares with hearing firsthand accounts that offer a realistic view of the business school experience that go beyond the brand messages of school websites and admissions events. Have conversations about why they decided to go to business school, why they chose the program they did, what were the highlights or surprises of their experience, and what they wish they had known when starting this process.

It truly is the people, not the brochure bullet points, that bring a school to life, so the more person-to-person contact you have, the more informed you will be when it comes time to apply – and when you finally set foot on campus.

 

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Should You Take the GMAT or GRE?

Now that most of the top business schools in the United States accept both the GMAT and GRE exam for admission, how do you decide which test you should take? Many elite schools hope to diversify their applicant …

MBA application

Now that most of the top business schools in the United States accept both the GMAT and GRE exam for admission, how do you decide which test you should take? Many elite schools hope to diversify their applicant pool by accepting the GRE as an alternative in the admissions process. Another favorable aspect for business schools: it creates a more competitive enrollment rate; the number of available spots stays the same but the volume of applications goes up.

Prospective grad students of the arts and sciences have typically submitted GRE scores, so applicants deciding between business school and other graduate programs appreciate having one less test to study and pay for. Meanwhile the GMAT, long considered the gold standard for the specific academic skills needed in graduate business school, is more expensive and offered in fewer locations worldwide.

One essential difference between the tests is that the GRE requires you to do the arguing, whereas in the GMAT you analyze what has been argued. The style expected from GRE test readers is more abstract and draws from various sources and disciplines for examples or references, whereas it is more concrete and analytical for the GMAT. This supports the suitability of the GRE for the more academically-minded student.

A recent US News and World Report article weighs in with the following five factors MBA applicants should consider when choosing between the GMAT and GRE:

  1. Does the school have a strong preference for the GMAT?
  2. Are your math skills especially strong? The GMAT is generally more difficult in the quant section
  3. Are you a wordsmith at heart? The GRE is more challenging in verbal, particularly for non-native English speakers.
  4. Consider your post-MBA career goals. Some firms require applicants to submit GMAT scores.
  5. Test anxiety is generally lower with the GRE, which allows you to save and return to questions to check your work.

In general, top business schools will be looking for fairly high percentile scores on the GRE, especially on the quantitative section. I had one client who, while phenomenal in many ways, could not achieve a GMAT score above 600. Her quantitative percentile came in around 40—half of the target score.

Although I’ve seen applicants admitted with very low GMAT scores in the past, we decided to take advantage of this new option and submit her application to Harvard Business School with the GRE instead. Despite a lower overall performance, her GRE results boasted a much higher quant score, and in the end, she was admitted to HBS.

Ultimately though, the GMAT remains the “tried and true” entrance exam for business schools—the admissions team will have no questions about why you chose it. If you are a great test-taker and it’s all the same to you, I would stick with the GMAT.

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Texas MBA Gives Admissions Perspective on GMAT vs GRE

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Guidance for International MBA Applicants

Recent changes to immigration procedures have caused some confusion and concern among international MBA candidates applying to business schools in the United States. To help clarify matters, the Graduate Management Admission Council has created a page …

international MBA applicantsRecent changes to immigration procedures have caused some confusion and concern among international MBA candidates applying to business schools in the United States. To help clarify matters, the Graduate Management Admission Council has created a page on its website mba.com to help alleviate some of these concerns.

Here you’ll find resources and information that apply to international students, including an overview on applying for a visa to study in the U.S., and information from leading GMAT-using schools for students navigating U.S. travel and immigration policies.

If you’re looking for how to convert your grades to the GPA scale, want to hear from others who have chosen to go abroad for their MBA, or simply interested in general tips for successful international study, bookmark this resource today.

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3 Common Hurdles for International MBA Applicants
Show International Experience When Applying to Business School
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Image credit: Flickr user Fedecomite (CC BY 2.0) 

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