Wharton “Tweet Meet” to Provide Live Analysis of Super Bowl Ads

The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania’s Future of Advertising Program announced Wednesday that it will host the second annual “Wharton Future of Advertising Super Bowl Ad Tweet Meet.”

Experts and pundits participating in the event will include Wharton marketing faculty, advertising executives, students, and journalists, who will comment on Super Bowl TV ads live via Twitter. The panel will begin tweeting their impressions at 7:30 pm ET at www.myfoa.net and #whartonfoa.

“This initiative is part of our year-long efforts to bring together Wharton scholarship, advertising agencies, media and corporate marketers for creative dialogue,” says Catharine Findiesen Hays, Managing Director of the Wharton FoA Program.

“With the support of our Global Advisory Board and the event’s co-creator, Scott Goodson, Chairman of StrawberryFrog, we have assembled some of the finest minds from across the new, more broadly-defined field of advertising and marketing.”

According to Hays, a new addition to the Tweet Meet is the planned rating of ads live during the Super Bowl.  Panelists will judge the commercial spots in four categories:

  1. Word of Mouth:  Will members of the public really love it and will they talk about it online and offline?
  2. Creative Excellence:  Is the ad creatively excellent?
  3. Business Impact: Will this achieve the advertiser’s business objectives?
  4. Societal Impact: Will this campaign have a positive impact on society?

Goodson calls the Super Bowl the largest, most talked-about marketing event of the year, as well as an opportunity for marketing innovation. “All of us on the Second Annual Wharton Future of Advertising Super Bowl Ad Tweet Meet will be giving our colorful comments live – thumbs up and thumbs down – and debating the cross cutting implications of the ads,” Goodson says.

At Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management will also be analyzing the most and least successful ads aired during the game at the eighth annual Super Bowl Advertising Review. According to Kellogg, the Ad Review’s unique focus is on effectiveness–looking beyond the popularity polls to consider the strategy and branding.

The Review is led by Kellogg professors Tim Calkins and Derek Rucker, who follow Super Bowl advertising closely and speak about advertising trends, themes, strategies and predictions, including:

  • What qualities are essential to produce an effective Super Bowl ad?
  • 2011 was the year of the automobile in Super Bowl ads. What will 2012 bring, and what might it signal for the economy?
  • Online views of this year’s Super Bowl ads are expected to nearly double from 2011. How should marketers capitalize on this trend and enhance the value of their investment in the game?
  • Why is creating a strong Super Bowl ad so difficult? Why do some advertisers consistently perform well while other regular advertisers struggle to create strong spots?

Results of the judging at Wharton School will be posted at www.myfoa.net Monday, February 6, 2012. Professors Calkins and Rucker have already started sharing insights about this year’s Super Bowl advertising on their blog at http://kelloggsuperbowlreview.wordpress.com, and will provide a comprehensive wrap-up after the big game.

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One Response to Wharton “Tweet Meet” to Provide Live Analysis of Super Bowl Ads

  1. I’m pointing out how the Pats are in the exact same boat… This is gonna be a damn good game, but many of the “reasons” why everyone’s saying the Giants will win can go either way for both teams. So the Giants beat a playoff choke Atlanta team, or a rusty Aaron Rodgers, or a crappy SF offense and needed 2 fumbles to win. So the Pats beat crappy Tebow, and got lucky against the Ravens you could say? as well. Both teams are lucky to be here, but also deserve to be here

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